Guide to the Henry Clay Frick Business Records, 1862-1987 AIS.2002.06

ULS Archives & Special Collections

Table of Contents

Summary Information
Biography
Scope and Content Notes
Arrangement
Administrative Information
Related Materials
Controlled Access Headings
Previous Citation
Bibliography
Collection Inventory
Series I. Abraham Overholt & Company,1881-1888
Series II. Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited,1867-1894
Series III. Carnegie Company,1900-1901
Series IV. Carnegie Steel Company,1892-1900
1. Administrative Records,1892-1900
2. Iron Clad Agreement,1887-1900
3. Scrapbooks,1892-1900
Series V. Carnegie, Phipps & Company, Limited,1888-1897
Series VI. Cerro de Pasco Corporations,1901-1925
1. Correspondence,1901-1925
2. Reports,1902-1905
3. Financial Material,1903-1917
4. Administrative Records,1902-1919
Series VII. Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company,1901-1904
1. Correspondence,1901-1904
2. Financial Material,1901-1904
3. Administrative Records,1902-1904
4. Bound Volumes,1901-1904, undated
Series VIII. Clairton Street Railway Company,1905-1916
1. Correspondence,1906-1912
2. Financial Material,1905-1912
3. Administrative Records,1905-1916
Series IX. Correspondence,1883-1919
1. Andrew Carnegie,1883-1912
2. Charles M. Schwab,1889-1903
3. James Gayley,1890-1900
4. Employees and Business Transactions,1888-1919
Series X. Ephemeral Materials,1878-1947
1. Record Books,1878-1942
2. Civic Material,1899-1919
3. Railroad Records,1902-1913
4. Engraving Plates,1929
Series XI. Faraday Coal & Coke Company,1862-1934
1. Administrative Records,1894-1926
2. Correspondence,1901-1934
3. Financial Material,1862-1924
4. Legal Material,1906-1911
Series XII. Frick Building,1898-1984
1. Frick Building General Material,1901-1928
2. Frick Building Construction Reports,1898-1912
3. Frick Building Financial Material,1901-1962
4. Frick Building Rent Issues,1900-1951
5. Frick Building Correspondence,1902-1931
6. Frick Building Employee Material [RESTRICTED],1902-1984
7. Frick Building Hump Removal Project,1904-1915
8. Frick Building Sale,1967-1982
9. Frick Building Printing Plates and Engravings,undated
10. Frick Building Record Books,1902-1957
11. Union Restaurant Co. Correspondence,1902-1917
12. Union Restaurant Co. Administrative and Financial Material,1902-1915
13. The Union Club Administrative Material,1900-1911
14. Union Safe Deposit Co. Financial Material,1903-1928
15. Union Safe Deposit Co. Administrative Material,1897-1913
16. Union Safe Deposit Co. Correspondence,1902-1914
Series XIII. H.C. Frick Coke Company,1871-1921
1. Scrapbooks,1884-1896
2. Correspondence,1891-1900
3. Administrative Records,1871-1921
Series XIV. Highland Building,1909-1922
Series XV. Hump Removal,1899-1914
Series XVI. Jellico Coal Lands,1903-1943
1. Administrative Records,1908-1936
2. Legal Material,1908-1936
3. Correspondence,1910-1943
Series XVII. Josiah Vankirk Thompson,1914-1920
1. Coal Properties,1908-1936
2. Legal Material,1915-1920
3. Scrapbooks,1916
Series XVIII. Shaw Coal Company,1890-1925
1. Administrative Records,1900-1925
2. Financial Material,1900-1926
3. Legal Material,1894-1916
4. Correspondence,1901-1918
5. Record Books,1900-1925
Series XIX. St. Clair Improvement Company,1890-1925
1. Correspondence,1901-1915
2. Financial Material,1905-1914
3. Administrative Records,1901-1914
4. Bound Volumes,1901-1915
5. Printing Plates,1906
Series XX. St. Paul Coal Company,1914-1926
Series XXI. Union Arcade/Union Trust Building,1906-1940
1. Correspondence1901-1915
2. Financial Material,1915-1919
3. Rent Material,1915-1940
4. Construction Records,1915-1919
5. Legal Material- Osterling Court Case,1915-1926
6. Invoices: Union Trust Building,1935-1948
Series XXII. Union Trust Company,1895-1921
Series XXIII. Union, Joliet, and Illinois Steel Companies,1884-1902
1. Union Iron & Steel Company,1884-1889
2. Joliet Iron & Steel Company,1885-1888
3. Illinois Steel Company,1889-1892
Series XXIV. United States Steel Corporation,1899-1919
1. Administrative Records,1902-1912
2. Correspondence,1903-1919
3. Property Material,1899-1910
4. Legal Material,1899-1915
Series XXV. Westmoreland-Fayette Historical Society,1906-1987
Series XXVI. William Penn Hotel,1890-1925
1. Property Material,1890-1922
2. Construction Records,1914-1916
3. Correspondence,1913-1919
4. Finance Material,1914-1918
Series XXVII. Pittsburgh Atlases and Plat Maps,1889-1923
Series XXVIII. Maps and Architectural Drawings
1. Series-Related Material
2. Properties
3. Canals and Waterways
4. Machinery
5. U.S. Geological Surveys
6. Railroads
7. Assorted Maps and Architectural Drawings
Series XXIX. Printed Materials,1889-1929

Summary Information

Repository
ULS Archives & Special Collections
Title
Henry Clay Frick Business Records
Creator
Frick, Henry Clay, 1849-1919
Creator
Helen Clay Frick Foundation.
Collection Number
AIS.2002.06
Date
1862-1987
Extent
250.0 linear feet
Abstract
The Henry Clay Frick Business Records contain material reflecting the business and financial activities of Henry Clay Frick (1849-1919) with particular relevance to Pittsburgh and the western Pennsylvania region. These materials highlight Frick’s ascent into prominence during a period of American industrial growth. The resources range from Frick’s initial forays into business, including his first coal firm, H.C. Frick & Company, to his negotiations that facilitated the mega merger that formed United States Steel Corporation in 1899. Some of Frick’s most prominent associates were many of the steel and financial titans of the Gilded Age, including Andrew Carnegie, Charles Schwab, Andrew Mellon, Henry Oliver, H.H. Rogers, Henry Phipps, and J.P. Morgan. Frick especially kept in frequent correspondence with Andrew Carnegie among many others as noted in the collection material. The bulk of the collection dates from 1881 to 1914, when Frick was most active in the coal and steel industry in Pittsburgh. Digital reproductions of this collection are available online.
Sponsor Note
Funding for this project was made available by Helen Clay Frick Foundation.

Preferred Citation

Henry Clay Frick Business Records, 1862-1987, AIS.2002.06, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

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Biography

Industrialist and art patron, Henry Clay Frick (1849-1919), was born in West Overton, Pennsylvania, a rural village settled by Mennonites about 40 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, Pa. His grandfather, Abraham Overholt, owner of the Overholt farm and distillery, was a respected figure in his small village. Frick’s future economic gains would be tied in-part to the location of his family’s homestead. The Overholt farm was situated in the middle of the Pittsburgh Coal seam in the coal rich Connellsville region of Fayette County, Pa. At the age of 21, Frick realized the potential of the local bituminous coal and borrowed money to form a partnership, Frick & Company, a coal and coke-producing firm. The newly-formed business used beehive ovens and blast furnaces to turn coal into coke, a fuel product that was in great demand by the growing steel industry in Pittsburgh. This was a highly successful venture and Frick soon controlled eighty percent of the coke output of Pennsylvania. During a financial panic in 1873, Frick seized the opportunity to buy out competitors, ally himself with the powerful Andrew Carnegie, and ensured a steady business by supplying his many steel companies. By 1879 at the age of thirty, Frick had made himself a millionaire.

Eventually, Carnegie brought Frick into Carnegie Brothers & Company, making him chairman. This created a reciprocal partnership: Carnegie supplied Frick with regular business and Frick provided a consistent supply of coke for Carnegie’s mills. As Chairman, Frick quickly reorganized all of Carnegie’s industrial firms and created the world's largest coke and steel company under the name Carnegie Steel Company. Although business was booming, tension began to grow between the two industrialists and came to a breaking point with the labor strike at the Homestead Works, part of Carnegie Steel Company. Although it was always Carnegie's intention to eliminate the unions in his mills, despite his union friendly persona, it was Henry Clay Frick who took the first action against the Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers union. Although Carnegie fully supported Frick’s decision and manner in which to break the strike, he quickly distanced himself from the now infamous and violent altercation that occurred at the Homestead mill in 1892. Frick was criticized for causing the death and carnage that arose from the strike which directly lead to an assassination attempt on his life by Alexander Berkman and Berkman’s companion, Emma Goldman. Frick survived the attack, making a full-recovery, but as the years went-on, he continued to have countless disputes with Carnegie which eventually resulted in Frick's resignation in 1899. Despite his resignation, Frick remained an active board member and continued to make decisions for the Carnegie Steel Company even assisting in the planning that eventually led to the formation of the United States Steel Corporation in late 1899.

In the early 1900s, Frick expanded his interests and built a large coke and steel plant in Clairton, Pa., called St. Clair Steel Company, while simultaneously investing in mining firms in West Virginia, Colorado, Wyoming, and in central Peru. Frick also made several major real estate investments in downtown Pittsburgh, financing building projects which included the Frick Building, Frick Annex, William Penn Hotel, and Union Arcade. During these pursuits, the Frick family experienced major personal tragedy with the death of his second daughter, Martha, and youngest son, Henry Clay, Jr., within a year of each other in late 1892. By 1905, Frick’s business and social interests had shifted from Pittsburgh to New York City. Frick moved his family including wife Adelaide and two other children, Childs and Helen Clay, to New York, where they spent the first ten years living in a Vanderbilt mansion on Fifth Avenue. Frick constructed his New York City mansion between 1913 and 1914, located at Seventieth Street and Fifth Avenue where he lived until his death in 1919. Frick left a fortune of nearly $50,000,000 with more than eighty percent of the amount being donated to charitable organizations.

In Frick’s later life, he made many charitable contributions to both New York City and Pittsburgh. Frick and his daughter, Helen Clay, were avid patrons of the arts and over the years amassed a famed collection of early-Renaissance and eighteenth-century French paintings and furniture, as well as some nineteenth and twentieth century English pieces. The main portion of the Frick art collection is housed at The Frick Collection in his former New York mansion, converted into a museum since 1935. However, a small portion of his art collection is on display at the Frick Art & Historical Center at Clayton, Frick’s Pittsburgh estate, also turned into a museum in late 1990.

Frick was a strong believer in the arts and education, so much so that he commissioned a fund to supplement educational opportunities for public school teachers in Pittsburgh. The fund was made permanent in 1916, and known as the Henry Clay Frick Educational Commission. In addition Frick would also provide many individual grants for special training to prospective teachers. The special grants were combined with the commission and eventually became known as the Henry Clay Frick Training School for Teachers.

After her father’s death, Helen continued his stated civic mission of “encouraging and developing the study of the fine arts and of advancing the general knowledge of kindred subjects,” and developed the University of Pittsburgh’s Henry Clay Frick Fine Arts Department in 1928. Later in 1965, she funded the Frick Fine Arts Building to house the department of fine arts and Frick Fine Arts Library, as well as the University of Pittsburgh teaching collection. Prior to that in November 1921, with aid from the Mellon family and the Frick Trust, the University of Pittsburgh acquired a 14 acre plot of land known as “Frick Acres” in the Oakland district of Pittsburgh for the site of the Cathedral of Learning, the tallest educational building erected in the United States. Helen’s other charitable contributions included the creation of a vacation home for young female textile workers at Eagle Rock, Frick’s vacation home in Pride's Crossing, Massachusetts; Frick Park in Pittsburgh; and transformation of Henry’s childhood home into a museum known as West Overton Village, a pre-American Civil War historic Mennonite village.

In 2001, the Helen Clay Frick Foundation Archives was entrusted to the Frick Art Reference Library in New York City and the University of Pittsburgh's Archive Service Center. The Helen Clay Frick Foundation divided the collection and placed the personal papers and photographs of the Frick family on deposit at The Frick Collection in New York City and deposited Henry Clay’s business records at the University of Pittsburgh. The archives were originally established in an effort to preserve, organize, and make accessible the records of Henry Clay Frick, his businesses, and family.

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Scope and Content Notes

The Henry Clay Frick Business Records contains material reflecting the business and financial activities of Henry Clay Frick (1849–1919) with particular relevance to Pittsburgh and the western Pennsylvania region. These materials highlight Frick’s ascent into prominence during a period of American industrial growth in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The resources range from Frick’s first businesses, including his first coal firm, H.C. Frick & Company, to correspondence between Frick and Andrew Carnegie, which also includes Frick’s negotiations that facilitated the mega merger that formed United States Steel Corporation in 1899. The material also addresses aspects of business specific to the late ninetieth century coke industry, including bituminous coal mining, beehive ovens, and railroad transportation.

The Henry Clay Frick Business Records contain 29 series that date from 1881 to 1987; the majority of the materials date from 1881 to 1914, when Frick was most active in the coal and steel industry in Pittsburgh. The majority of the material is categorized into four types of records: administrative material, financial records, legal material, and ephemeral items. The administrative material are generally made up of correspondence, letterpress copybooks, memoranda, invoices, company charters, meeting minutes, by-laws, deeds, contracts, certificates, pamphlets, proposals, specifications, labor costs, property assessments, building construction records, architectural drawings, blue prints, newspaper clipping scrapbooks, atlases, and plat maps. The financial records consist of receipts, reports, statements, stock accounts, taxes, bills, lease matters, rent and building costs, cashbooks, sales journals, accounts payable receipts, mortgages, estate/property values, as well as profit and loss statements. There is a small amount of legal material which has records of court cases, case notes, court rulings, and attorney services. The ephemera items include keys, stone samples, printing plates, and post cards. Further description is available at the series and subseries level.

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Arrangement

The collection is arranged into the following 29 series:

Series I. Abraham Overholt & Company, 1881-1888

Series II. Carnegie Brothers & Company, Ltd., 1867-1894

Series III. Carnegie Company, 1900-1901

Series IV. Carnegie Steel Company, Ltd., 1892-1900

Series V. Carnegie, Phipps, & Company, Ltd., 1887 to 1893

Series VI. Cerro de Pasco Companies, 1901-1925

Series VII. Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company, 1901-1904

Series VIII. Clairton Street Railway Company, 1905-1916

Series IX. Correspondence, 1883-1919

Series X. Ephemeral Material, 1878-1947

Series XI. Faraday Coal & Coke Company, 1862-1934

Series XII. Frick Building, 1897-1983

Series XIII. Henry Clay Frick Coke Companies, 1871-1900

Series XIV. Highland Building, 1909-1922

Series XV. Hump Removal, 1899-1914

Series XVI. Jellico Coal Lands, 1903-1943

Series XVII. Josiah Vankirk Thompson, 1914-1920

Series XVIII. Shaw Coal Company, 1890-1925

Series XIX. St. Clair Improvements Company, 1901-1915

Series XX. St. Paul Coal Company, 1914-1926

Series XXI. Union Arcade Building/Union Trust Building, 1906-1948

Series XXII. Union Trust Company, 1895-1921

Series XXIII. Union, Joliet, and Illinois Steel Companies, 1884-1902

Series XXIV. United States Steel Corporation, 1899-1919

Series XXV. Westmoreland- Fayette Historical Society, 1906-1987

Series XXVI. William Penn Hotel, 1890-1925

Series XXVII. Pittsburgh Atlases and Plat Maps

Series XXVIII. Maps and Architectural Drawings

Series XXIX. Printed Materials

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Administrative Information

Publication Information

ULS Archives & Special Collections, October 2010

University of Pittsburgh Library System
Archives & Special Collections
Website: library.pitt.edu/archives-special-collections
412-648-3232 (ASC) | 412-648-8190 (Hillman)
Contact Us: www.library.pitt.edu/ask-archivist

Revision Description

 Links to digitized content added which includes selected correspondence and scrapbooks. November 2015

Access Restrictions

None other than a portion of the material in Series XII. Frick Building, Subseries 6. Frick Building Employee Material is restricted for 75 years from date of creation. Until this restriction is removed, researchers wishing to access these records must sign a confidentiality agreement with the Archives Service Center.

Copyright

Permission for publication is given on behalf of the University of Pittsburgh as the custodian of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained.

Custodial History

The majority of the original manuscript collection was housed in compact shelving on the second floor of the carriage house at Clayton, the Frick family's Pittsburgh estate, while some of the Frick family letters and Helen’s personal papers could be found Frick’s New York City estate.

When Helen Clay Frick died in 1984, she bequeathed the family archives to her namesake foundation; however, she did not specifically identify where the archival material should be permanently housed. In 2001, an agreement was reached whereby Henry Clay Frick's business records would be housed in the University of Pittsburgh's Archives Service Center; the remainder, including family letters and Helen Clay Frick's papers, would go to the Archives of The Frick Collection and Frick Art Reference Library (FARL) in New York City.

The University of Pittsburgh was the recipient of a major grant from the Helen Clay Frick Foundation to work on processing the collection. (The Frick Foundation made a similar award to FARL to work on that portion of the collection held there.) This grant funded archival work has made it possible for this significant collection to be available to researchers. In addition to complete processing and the full description of the collection made by a team of archivists, the Archives Service Center enabled the encoding of the extensive and detailed finding aid to be viewed online.

The collection is held in the Archives Service Center, within the University of Pittsburgh Library System. Unless noted, the collection is unrestricted and available for research use in the Archives Service Center Reading Room.

Acquisition Informantion

Deposited by the Helen Clay Frick Foundation in 2002. Subsequently gifted to the University of Pittsburgh in July 2015.

Processing Information

This collection was processed by Project Archivists Matthew Yount (2004-2007) and Alesha Shumar (2009-2010), with assistance from Julie Aher (2004-2006) and Zach Brodt (2010). As part of an internship program in 2006, abstracts to portions of the Henry Clay Frick and Andrew Carnegie correspondence were created by Anna Dabrishus, David Thielet, and Todd Thomas, undergraduate students at the University of Pittsburgh majoring in History.

Existence and Location of Copies

Digital reproductions of the correspondence between Frick and Carnegie are digitized and online. This includes correspondence held by the The Frick Collection and Frick Art Reference Library in New York City. Several scrapbooks containing newsclippings created by the Carnegie Steel Company documenting the Homestead Steel Strike are digitized as are scrapbooks created by the H.C. Frick Coke Company to document the coal and coke industry in southwest Pennsylvania.

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Related Materials

Related Material

Frick Family Papers, The Frick Collection/Frick Art Reference Library Archives, New York City, New York

Associated Brotherhood of Iron and Steel Heaters, Roughers and Rollers of the United States Records, 1872-1875, AIS.1973.11, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Bernard Gorczyca Papers, 1940-2006, AIS.2006.16, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Brashear Association, Pittsburgh, Pa. Records, 1891-1978, AIS.1979.17, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Civic Club of Allegheny County Records, 1896-1974, AIS1970.02, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Correspondence of Charles M. Schwab, 1891, AIS.1994.02, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Eugene Henry Jobson, 1925-1941, AIS.1990.06, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

James Bonar Papers, 1912-1980, AIS.1965.13, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

John Gates Photograph Collection, ca. 1910, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Ken Kobus Photograph Collection, AIS.2006.18, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Kingsley Association Records, 1894-1980, AIS.1970.05, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Oliver Iron and Steel Company Records, 1863-1930, AIS.1964.06, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Pittsburgh City Photographer Collection, 1901-2002 AIS.1971.05, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Pittsburgh Railways Company Records, 1872-1974, AIS.1974.29, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Ralph D. Webb, Jr. Records, relating to the Carnegie Steel Company, 1936-1938, AIS.1997.09, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Ralph E. Griswold, GWSM, Inc. Collection, 1912-1988, AIS.2001.10, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Steffi Domike Papers, 1946-1994, AIS.1997.20, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Union Arcade Building Photographs, 1915-1916, AIS.2005.09, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

United Steelworkers of America Local 1397 (Homestead, PA) Records, 1937-1972, AIS.1993.17, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

William H. Coleman Papers, 1906-1942, AIS.1964.18, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

William J. Gaughan Collection, 1887-1988, AIS.1994.03, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

William Martin Papers, 1866-1933, AIS.2005.06, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

William P. Feeney Papers, AIS.2000.11, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

William Penn Hotel, 1914-1916, AIS.2008.01, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)

  • Abraham Overholt & Company.
  • Allegheny County Courthouse and Jail (Pittsburgh, Pa.).
  • Carnegie Brothers & Company, Ltd. Duquesne Steel Works.
  • Carnegie Brothers & Company, Ltd. Monastery Coke Works.
  • Carnegie Brothers & Company, Ltd. Youghiogheny Coke Works.
  • Carnegie Steel Company. Lorimer Coke Works.
  • Carnegie Steel Company. Lucy Furnaces.
  • Carnegie Steel Company. Sciota Ore Mines.
  • Carnegie Steel Company. Union Iron Mills.
  • Carnegie, Phipps & Co..
  • Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company.
  • Clairton Street Railway Company.
  • D.H. Burnham & Company.
  • Faraday Coal & Coke Company.
  • Federal Steel Company.
  • Frick Building (Pittsburgh, Pa.).
  • H. C. Frick Coal and Coke Company.
  • H. C. Frick Coal Company.
  • H. C. Frick Coke Company. Beech Fork Works.
  • H. C. Frick Coke Company.
  • Highland Building (Pittsburgh, Pa.).
  • Homestead Steel Works. Carrie Furnaces.
  • Homestead Steel Works.
  • Keystone Bridge Company.
  • Pinkerton's National Detective Agency.
  • Pittsburgh & Western Railway Company.
  • Pittsburgh and Lake Erie Railroad Company.
  • Pittsburgh Bessemer Steel Company.
  • Shaw Coal Company.
  • Union Arcade Building (Pittsburgh, Pa.).
  • Union Club (Pittsburgh, Pa.).
  • Union Iron & Steel Company.
  • Union Trust Building (Pittsburgh, Pa.).
  • United States Steel Corporation. Edgar Thomson Works.
  • United States Steel Corporation.
  • William Penn Hotel (Pittsburgh, Pa.).

Family Name(s)

  • Overholt family

Geographic Name(s)

  • Allegheny County (Pa.)
  • Broad Ford (Pa.)
  • Bucks County (Pa.)
  • Cerro de Pasco (Peru)
  • Clairton (Pa.)
  • Connellsville (Pa.)
  • Downtown (Pittsburgh, Pa.)
  • Kentucky
  • Monongahela River (W. Va. and Pa.)
  • Monongahela River Valley (W. Va. and Pa.)
  • Mount Pleasant (Westmoreland County, Pa. : Township)
  • New Jersey
  • New York (N.Y.)
  • Pennsylvania, Western
  • Pittsburgh (Pa.)
  • Pocahontas Coal Seam (W. Va.)
  • Virginia
  • West Overton (Pa.)
  • West Virginia
  • Westmoreland County (Pa.)

Personal Name(s)

  • Abbott, William L. (William Latham), 1852-1930
  • Berkman, Alexander, 1870-1936
  • Burham, D. H. (Daniel Hudson)
  • Carnegie, Andrew, 1835-1919
  • Carnegie, Thomas M., 1843-1886
  • Carr, William A.
  • Childs, Otis H.
  • Frick, Adelaide Childs, 1859-1931
  • Frick, Helen Clay, 1888-1984
  • Frick, Henry Clay, 1849-1919
  • Frick, Martha, 1885-1891
  • Gary, Elbert H. (Elbert Henry), 1846-1927
  • Gayley, James
  • Mellon, Andrew W. (Andrew William), 1855-1937
  • Mellon, Thomas, 1813-1908
  • Morgan, J. Pierpont (John Pierpont), 1837-1913
  • Oliver, Henry William, 1840-1904
  • Osterling, F. J., 1865-1934
  • Overholt, Abraham, 1765-1834
  • Overholt, Christian
  • Overholt, Henry
  • Overholt, J. S. R.
  • Overholt, Jacob
  • Overholt, Karl F.
  • Phipps, Henry, 1839-1930
  • Rogers, Henry Huttleston, 1840-1909
  • Schwab, Charles M., 1862-1939
  • Thompson, Josiah Vankirk
  • Tintsman, Abraham

Subject(s)

  • Architecture
  • Buildings -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh -- Design and construction
  • Business and Industry
  • Coal mines and mining -- Pennsylvania
  • Coal trade -- Pennsylvania
  • Coke industry -- Pennsylvania
  • Labor
  • Manufacturing industries -- Pennsylvania
  • Railroads -- Pennsylvania
  • Steel industry and trade -- Pennsylvania
  • Whiskey industry -- Pennsylvania

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Previous Citation

Henry Clay Frick Business Records, 1862-1987, AIS.2002.06, Archives Service Center, University of Pittsburgh

Helen Clay Frick Foundation Archives, 1892-1987, AIS.2002.06, Archives Service Center, University of Pittsburgh

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Bibliography

Boehmig, Stuart P. Downtown Pittsburgh. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2007.

Brody, John. Steelworkers in America: The nonunion era. Cambridge, MA: Havard University Press, 1960.

Brophy, John. A Miner’s Life. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 1964.

Burgoyne, Arthur G. Homestead Strike of 1892. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1979.

Carnegie, Andrew. The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie; and, The gospel of wealth. New York: Signet Classics, 2006.

Clayton, Lawrence A. Peru and the United States: The condor and the eagle. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1999.

Collin, John F.S. Stringtown on the Pike: Tales and History of East Liberty. Ann Arbor: Edward Brothers, 1966.

DiCiccio, Carmen. Coal and Coke in Pennsylvania. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, 1996.

Fisher, Douglas A. Steel Serves the Nation, 1901-1951: A fifty year story of United States Steel. New York: United States Steel Corporation, 1951.

Hamersly, Lewis Randolph. Who's who in Pennsylvania; containing authentic biographies of Pennsylvanians who are leaders and representatives in various departments of worthy human achievement. New York, L.R. Hamersly company, 1904.

Hessen, Robert. Steel Titan: the Life of Charles M. Schwab. New York: Oxford University Press, 1975.

Hillstrom, Kevin and Laurie Collier Hillstrom. Industrial revolution in America. Vol. 1, Iron and steel. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 2005.

Ingham, John N. Biographical dictionary of American business leaders. Westport, Conn: Greenwood Press, 1983.

Ingham, John N. Making Iron and Steel: Independent Mills in Pittsburgh, 1820-1920. Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press, 1991.

Kidney, Walter. Landmark Architecture: Pittsburgh and Allegheny County. Pittsburgh, PA: Pittsburgh History and Landmark Foundation, 1997.

Killikelly, Sarah Hutchins. The History of Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh, PA: B.C. & Gordon Montgomery, 1906.

Lichtenstein, Nelson, et al. Who Built America?: From 1877 to Present, Vol. 2. New York: Worth, 2000.

Long, Priscilla. Where the Sun Never Shines: A History of America’s Bloody Coal Industry. New York: Paragon House, 1989.

Morris, Charles R. The Tycoons: how Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Jay Gould, and J.P. Morgan invented the American supereconomy. New York: H. Holt and Co., 2005.

Nasaw, David. Andrew Carnegie. New York: Penguin Press, 2006.

Roush, G.A. (ed). The Mineral Industry: Its statistics, technology and trade during 1915. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1916.

Sanger, Martha Frick Symington. Henry Clay Frick: An intimate Portrait. New York: Abbeville Press, 1998.

Schreiner, Jr. Samuel A. Henry Clay Frick: The Gospel of Greed. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1995.

Thurston, George Henry. Allegheny County's Hundred Years. Pittsburgh, PA: A.A. Anderson & Son, Book and job printers, 1888.

Trachtenberg, Alexander. The History of Legislation for the Protection of Coal Miners in Pennsylvania, 1824–1915. New York: International Publishers, 1942.

Warren, Kenneth. Big Steel: The first century of the United State Steel Corporation, 1901-2001. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2001.

Warren, Kenneth. Triumphant Capitalism. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1996.

Warren, Kenneth. The American Steel Industry, 1850-1970: a geographical interpretation. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1973.

Whitelaw, Nancy. Homestead Steel Strike of 1892. Greensboro, NC: Morgan Reynolds, 2006.

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Collection Inventory

Series  I. Abraham Overholt & Company, 1881-1888 

Historical Background

In 1800, Henry Overholt (1739-1813), grandfather of Henry Clay Frick, and his family migrated west from Bucks County, Pennsylvania, to the southwestern edge of the state, settling in Westmoreland County. The Overholt homestead is located in West Overton near present day Scottdale, Pennsylvania. When Henry Overholt settled here, he built his farm eventually adding a gristmill and small distillery, both for the processing and sale of rye grain cultivated on his land. In 1810, Henry’s son Abraham persuaded his father to begin to produce rye whiskey commercially at the Overholt distillery. Henry agreed and the Overholts’ became the first to produce rye whiskey in Pennsylvania for commercial consumption instead of medicinal purposes. Although the Overholts’ were Mennonite and the church disapproved of the production or sale of whiskey, Abraham continued to market his rye whiskey as “Old Farm Whiskey.” One of Abraham’s sons built a second distillery at nearby Broad Ford, Pa., where he produced “Old Overholt” or “Monongahela Rye" whiskey. The production and sale of the rye whiskey allowed the family estate to grow and expand over 260 acres. This expansion enabled the family to distill between six and eight gallons or four times more rye whiskey per day then when they began.

At Henry's death, his sons Abraham and Christian inherited the farm and distillery business. As their business grew, several buildings were erected to address the rising demand of whiskey by the public. Together Abraham and Christian built up and enlarged the distillery which now had the production capacity of almost 200 gallons of rye whiskey per day. Soon after, Abraham bought out Christian’s shares of the company and in the mid-1800s went into business with his two sons, Jacob and Henry. At this time, Abraham renamed the business, Abraham Overholt & Company.

The Overholt entrepreneurial legacy would continue through the lineage which eventually produced in Abraham Overholt’s grandson, Henry Clay Frick, a valuable lesson in business. The Abraham Overholt & Company thrived for several generations until the company was forced to close in 1919 due to Prohibition. Later, Helen Clay Frick, daughter of Henry Clay Frick, used the distillery buildings for museum purposes as part of the historic West Overton Village.

Scope and Content Notes

The materials in this series contains the financial records of Abraham Overholt & Company, including sales and cash journals for the period of 1881 to 1888. The ledger is a financial account including an alphabetical index of individuals, bills paid and received, stock accounts, and transactions with local businesses and companies, such as Broad Ford Distillery, H.C. Frick, and Andrew Mellon. There is also a small amount of ephemeral materials, including pamphlets, post cards, and checks from the Overholt Distillery. These contain a brief history of the business; however no dates are noted on the ephemeral material.

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Distillery postcards 11
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Distillery 100th anniversary pamphlets 2
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Distillery mailing pamphlets 3
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Distillery checks 4
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Obituary of Abraham Overholt 5
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View of property of A.S.R. Overholt & Company, West Overton, Pa. WCCC., undated    (16" x 20") 6
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Journal, April 11, 1881-November 18, 1888 2
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Journal, Sales, April 13, 1881-June 11, 1888 3
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Journal, April 30, 1881-November 20, 1888 4
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Ledger, April 1881-June 1888 5

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Series  II. Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited, 1867-1894 

Historical Background

In the early 1880s, Andrew Carnegie decided to consolidate his steel interests by combining his Pittsburgh based businesses of the Lucy Furnaces, Edgar Thomson Steel Works, Monastery Coke Works, Carnegie & Company’s Larimer Coke Works, Sciota Ore Mines, and Union Iron Mills into one company formally organized under the name Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited. The consolidation provided the new company with an interest of approximately $5 million dollars, with Carnegie owning more than half. In the same year, Henry Clay Frick began to supply the newly formed company with coal and coke needed for the production and transport of iron and steel. Frick eventually became the main supplier of coke to Carnegie’s mills. With the death of Thomas Carnegie, Andrew’s brother and business partner, in 1886, Frick was given the opportunity to manage a portion of the company. Frick, insuring his investment in the business, bought a small portion of the company’s shares. With increasing responsibilities in the company, Frick was promoted and named chairman of Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited. In this position Frick moved quickly and assisted in the reorganization of Carnegie’s steel businesses. Frick initiated far-reaching improvements and directed the buy out of Carnegie’s chief competitor, Duquesne Steel Works. In 1892, Frick persuaded Carnegie to merge Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited and Carnegie, Phipps & Company into one large company: Carnegie Steel Company, Limited. This merger to Carnegie Steel was formally organized on July 1, 1892.

The Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited had investments and contracts in railway production and transport. The company had many business contacts most notably being the Steel Patent Company, Pittsburgh & Western Railway, Rail Makes’ Association, and Keystone Bridge Company. The Steel Patent Company of Philadelphia advised steel companies on litigation over steel patents and processes. The Rail Makers’ Association was created by a group of companies that were involved in rail production. Businesses like the Carnegie companies, Illinois Steel Company, Bethlehem Iron Company, and many others wanted to secure uniformity of the railways. The Pittsburgh and Western Railway Company was originally organized on September 7, 1877 under the name of the Pittsburgh, New Castle & Lake Erie Railroad. Carnegie Brother & Company, Limited was an investor and supplier to the Pittsburgh and Western Railway. Carnegie and several associates also reorganized the Piper and Schiffler Company to create the Keystone Bridge Company which produced iron materials for building railroad bridges.

Scope and Content Notes

This series contains materials of the Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited, including business records, correspondence, agreements, reports, financial statements, estimates, copybooks, and a court case that documents the business deals with railway, steel, and patent companies. The majority of the material consists of incoming correspondences to Frick from such noted businessmen as Robert F. Kennedy, President of Steel Patents Company and Rail Maker’s Association secretary; Henry Oliver, Pittsburgh and Western Railway Company President; A.L. Griffin, President of Keystone Bridge Company; Charles M. Schwab, general Superintendent of Edgar Thomson Steel Works and Furnaces; and C.L. Strobel, Chief Engineer of Keystone Bridge Company. Other materials pertaining to specific interests of Carnegie and Frick include dealings with local businesses such as Duquesne Steel Works and Carnegie Natural Gas Company.

The materials date from 1867 to 1894; however, the bulk of the materials are from 1886 to 1891. There are also two letterpress copybooks that contain outgoing letters from the company’s Chairman, H.C. Frick, to various businessmen, including Andrew Carnegie. The record books date from January 1889 to January 1892.

Related Material

Additional letterpress copybooks that contain outgoing correspondence from Henry Clay Frick to Andrew Carnegie can also be found in Series IX. Correspondence, 1883-1919, Subseries 1. Andrew Carnegie, 1883-1912. Abstracts and digitized contents are available.

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Carnegie Brothers Formation Agreement, April 1, 1881 61
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Carnegie Brothers & Company, Ltd. Statements, October 1888-April 1892 2
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Carnegie Brothers & Company, Ltd. Valuations of Taxable Property, May 21, 1892 3
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Carnegie Brothers & Company, Ltd. Correspondence, February 27, 1889-July 7, 1892 4
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Adam Robb v. Carnegie Brothers & Company, Ltd., Court Cases, October 23, 1889, October 5, 1891 5
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Carnegie Brothers & Company, Ltd. Iron Ore Matters, November 4, 1889-June 1, 1892 6
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Carnegie Brothers & Company, Ltd. Notes, December 1-3, 1889, August 31, 1890 7
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Shareholders Agreements Copy, December 10, 1886-December 8, 1891 8
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Shareholders List, December 31, 1887, November 1, 1889, June 30, 1892 9
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Shareholders Meeting Notes, January 4, 1889-May 4, 1891 10
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Duquesne Steel Works, March 1, 1891, July 12, 1891 11
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Carnegie Natural Gas Company, April 16, 1892 12
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Railroad Contractors Act, March 18, 1873, April 18, 1874 13
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Rail Carrier Patent, Andrew Gustin Correspondence, October 30, 1889-April 30, 1890 14
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Gjers Soaking Pit Patent, John Gjers Correspondence, September 30, 1882- July 7, 1891 15
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Reese Tar Brick Patent, Robert Kennedy Correspondence, July 11, 1891-February 3, 1894 16
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Patents, United States Patent Office, August 13, 1867-October 12, 1886 17
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Pittsburgh & Western Railway Company, November 21, 1889-July 16, 1891 18
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Pittsburgh & Western Railway Company, General Ledger Balance, February 28-November 1, 1890 19
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Pittsburgh & Western Railway Company, September 23-October 7, 1890 20
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Pittsburgh & Western Railway Company, June 1890-July 1, 1891 21
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Pittsburgh & Western Railway Company, September 19-October 16, 1891 22
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Rail Maker’s Association, February 4, 1889-October 15, 1891 71
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Keystone Bridge Company, Agreement, October 15, 1891 2
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Keystone Bridge Company, Correspondence, May 2, 1890-October 16, 1891 3
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Keystone Bridge Company, Correspondence, January 1892-February 11, 1893 4
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Keystone Bridge Company, Correspondence, January 1892-February 11, 1893 5
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Keystone Bridge Company, Financial Matters, October 24, 1890-February 9, 1892 6
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Keystone Bridge Company, Financial Matters, Property, January 1, 1892-February 11, 1893 7
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Keystone Bridge Company, Stockholders, December 29, 1890-March 22, 1892 8
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H.C. Frick Letterpress Copybook, January 28, 1889-April 24, 1890 81

Scope and Content Notes

The letterpress copybooks comprises copies of outgoing correspondence from H.C. Frick to numerous individuals. Due to the significance of Frick's correspondence with Andrew Carnegie in particular, abstracts were created for these specific letters by History undergraduate students interning at the Archives Service Center. The numbering besides each item below refers to the page number in the copybook where the letter can be found.

 23. Frick wires Carnegie about his conversation with Mr. Pitcairn. Pitcairn states he showed a letter to Mr. Roberts and returned it to Frick. Frick understands Carnegie's course of action, but is regretful about it. April 6, 1889 Telegram
 25. Frick writes that he gave Mr. Oliver the letter to Measrs. E. D. Morgan to authorize purchase of stock [for Pittsburgh & Western Railway Co.]. April 9, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 26. Frick confirms their recent stock purchase and writes that he is going to see Mr. Quay about some legislation. April 10, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 28. Frick writes on the [Pennsylvania & Western Railway Co.] stock. April 11, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 29. Frick writes on the Pennsylvania & Western Railway Co. stock, Mr. Phipps having returned, and his trip to Philadelphia and New York. April 12, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 30. Frick writes that he has already paid for 7,645 shares and Mr. Oliver is in New York, [N.Y.] and will call on Carnegie today. April 13, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 35. Frick writes that it seems necessary for Carnegie Bros. & Co. to purchase half of the Callery Estate at once. April 17, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 37. Frick writes on arranging the purchase of 100,000 tons of Norrie Ore at $4.25. April 19, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 40. Frick wires Carnegie about Mr. Oliver being confident in his election. April 19, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 41. Frick includes a previous telegram message in his letter, and writes on the progress of the Callery stock purchase. April 19, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 42. Frick wires Carnegie on the Cleveland party being in Hot Springs, opening negotiations with Cochran of Brown & Cochran, and asking Carnegie to meet him in Philadelphia on Tuesday. April 20, 1889 Telegram
 44. Frick wires Carnegie on Abbott informing him that a line has been located and that he will look into in it next week. April 20, 1889 Telegram
 45. Frick wires Carnegie telling him that he'll meet Carnegie in Philadelphia on May 3rd and that Mr. Potter sent Frick a letter about Norrie Ore. April 25, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 47. Frick writes on his proposition to Mr. Leisenring and Mr. Potter's refusal to sell ore at their requested amount. April 25, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 55. Frick addresses Carnegie's concerns about stock purchasing, that individuals can issue bonds to any amount, while corporations are limited. May 13, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 62. Frick writes to Carnegie on E.D. Morgan's telegram message that asked Frick if he wanted to purchase additional stock, and Frick includes his telegram response that confirms the purchase of the additional stock. May 21, 1889 Telegram
 102. Frick wires Carnegie on the price of ore mixture and that Warrant has full information, including ore cost. July 12, 1889 Telegram
 127. Frick writes on growing worker agitation in coke region and possible strike on August 1st. July 31, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 130. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message. August 1, 1889 Telegram
 133. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message that is on negotiations. August 6, 1889 Telegram
 146. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message that mentions contracts for a furnace. August 16, 1889 Telegram
 162. Frick writes that George Oliver is offering $300,000 for Beaver [Falls works]. August 31, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 163. Frick asks Carnegie if they should accept George Oliver's offer and sell Beaver Falls works. August 31, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 165. Frick writes to Carnegie on the Eland matter and the Long Branch meeting with names being coded. August 31, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 167. Frick alerts Carnegie of an important letter sent to Orange, [N.J]. August 31, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 169. Frick asks Carnegie if his mailed letter will reach him at Orange, [N.J.]. September 2, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 170. Frick includes Carnegie's own telegrams in letter, and Frick states that he isn't committed to George Oliver's purchase. September 2, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 174. Frick wires Carnegie telling him that he isn't committed to George Oliver. September 3, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 178. Frick wires Carnegie on pig [iron] costs, rail practice being worse this year, and the estimate for August. September 6, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 215. Frick wires Carnegie on introducing the new General Superintendent[Mr. Schwab], who was well received. October 10, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 230. Frick writes Carnegie about his conversation with Mr. Oliver and Frick's refusal to sell Beaver [Falls Works] for less than $500,000. October 17, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 241. Frick tells Carnegie that they are ready to make billets, Mr. Leishman will see Carnegie in New York soon, and that Frick hasn't heard from Drexel [and Co.] yet. Beneath Frick wires Carnegie on Drexel [and Co.] accepting. October 19, 1889 Telegram
 254. Frick will be on lookout for letter and is leaving for Philadelphia tomorrow. Beneath Frick wires Carnegie on morning dispatch of interviews, specifically William Stewart's, stating that ore rates will not be raised until at least May. October 30, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 255. Frick states that he gives no credence to newspaper articles on ore rates, and has recently seen Oliver. October 30, 1889 Telegram
 255. Frick wires Carnegie on Elands operations confirmation and George Oliver's expected acceptance of their proposition. [Attached to previous correspondence.] October 31, 1889 
 272. Frick wires Carnegie on his conversation with Abbott about Stroble and on Curry being in Cleveland, [O.H]. November 16, 1889 Telegram
 277. Frick wires Carnegie on sending Hurst to San Francisco with Vandevort accompanying him. November 21, 1889 Telegram
 278. Frick wires Carnegie on his interview with [William] Park, and how Park would like to meet with Carnegie on Saturday in New York, [N.Y.]. November 21, 1889 Telegram
 279. Frick writes to Carnegie on his conversation with [William] Park to purchase his company [Allegheny Steel] for $600,000. November 21, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 280. Frick wires Carnegie telling him that he is closing with Pickands for 175 and [Alfred] Chandler for 150 more of Minnesota [Iron Company]. November 22, 1889 Telegram
 281. Frick writes Carnegie, telling him that he doesn't have much faith in [John] Potter. November 22, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 283. Frick writes on his meeting with the Board of Managers to discuss the Eland matter and also on a conversation with [William] Park. November 25, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 287. Frick writes Mr. [John] Vandevort's telegram to Carnegie and includes his response. November 25, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 288. Frick wires Carnegie about a serious explosion involving Eland, and now Frick's travel plans to Chicago will be delayed. November 26, 1889 Telegram
 291. Frick writes about a conflict involving Mr. Potter. November 26, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 296. Frick asks if a letter should be mailed to either New York or Washington. November 30, 1889 Telegram
 297. Frick tells Carnegie that he's wrong on the phosphorus. November 30, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 298. Frick asks for Carnegie's approval to telegram Mr. Morse about purchasing Norrie ore, writes about his upcoming trip to Chicago, and responds to Carnegie's note about "Pig." November 30, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 301. Frick tells Carnegie that a paper was mailed to Washington [D.C.], that there are no recent rail orders, and mentions November production rates for the Bessemer and Lucy's. December 2, 1889 Telegram
 307. Frick wires Carnegie about a "pig firm", and he will mail a detailed statement later on. December 7, 1889 Telegram
 307. Frick wires Carnegie and tells him that Mr. Morse would like Frick to be in Chicago tomorrow for the Norrie matter. [Attached to previous correspondence.] December 9, 1889 
 308. Frick writes to Carnegie about his conversation with Mr. [John] Munhall in Homestead about purchasing property. Also, Frick comments on the status of the Homestead Works and his visit to see Mr. Morse in Chicago. December 9, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 320. Frick asks Carnegie for a "yes or no" answer on Norrie. December 20, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 322. Frick writes to Carnegie on Mr. Lauder wanting to withdraw some of his interest. December 23, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 395. Frick writes about buying Semple's stock. February 14, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 397. Frick tells Carnegie that he wishes Humphrey could be kept East until option is secured on Semple stock. February 15, 1890 Telegram
 400. Frick relays a message from J.T. Odall of Baltimore & Ohio Road Baltimore to Carnegie that asks if the President will go to Pittsburgh next Wednesday. February 17, 1890 Telegram
 420. Frick writes that he saw Sheppard and that the Wednesday meeting is postponed. He also asks Carnegie if he can meet him in Philadelphia for the Messemer Steel Co. meeting. March 3, 1890 Telegram
 422. Frick writes that he will not be visiting the Ore Mines, would like to see Carnegie in Philadelphia for the Bessemer Steel Co., Ltd. annual meeting, responds to Carnegie's letter on the Pittsburgh central Railroad, and mentions the possibility of getting a contract with Mr. Westinghouse. March 3, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 425. Frick writes that Carnegie hasn't responded to Frick's suggested meeting, and he would like him to do so. March 4, 1890 Telegram
 484. Frick writes that Mr. Oliver settled with Mr. McCullough to setting ore rates at $1.05, and Frick was disappointed that he couldn't drop the rate to $1.00. May 20, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 486. Frick writes about his conversation with Mr. Vance of the Carnegie Co-operative Store Co. and how the store is doing poorly, and suggests some ideas to Carnegie on it. May 1, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 488. Frick writes that they have settled with the Callery & Downing Estate, but they did some editing to the paperwork. April 30, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 490. Frick writes to Carnegie about the editing changes to the paperwork for the closing of the Callery & Downing Estate. Frick asks if Carnegie has further suggestions on it. April 29, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 492. Frick writes on Mr. Oliver closing the Callery & Downing Estate and mentions Mr. Moore selling his option. April 27, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 494. Frick writes on wanting to set ore rates at $1.00 and on Mr. Moore selling his property. April 27, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 497. Frick writes on business in the Connellsville Coke Region, and mentions that Mr. Morse would be a good person to work with Mr. Rainey. April 20, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
  Volume
H.C. Frick Letterpress Copybook, April 24, 1890-January 12, 1892 2
 17. Frick writes that the letter on Coke will be valuable, and he includes his travel itinerary. May 14, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed
 88. Frick writes that the councils approve. August 4, 1890 Telegram
 101. Frick writes that he will postpone the execution contract until Carnegie returns. August 29, 1890 Telegram
 123. Frick welcomes Carnegie home and mentions that Mr. [John] Leishman is in New York, [N.Y.]. Beneath Frick thanks Carnegie for his inquiry. September 29, 1890 Telegram
 164. Frick writes that a report from the Commercial Gazette called Mr. Curry with private information, stating that Allegheny Bessemer Steel Company was going to be controlled by Carnegie, Phipps & Company soon. November 3, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 169. Frick writes that he agrees with Mr. Phipps that it would be better for Carnegie to visit before Phipps leaves. November 13, 1890 Telegram
 171. Frick wires Carnegie telling him that the papers are signed, and they will assume control on the 21st. November 14, 1890 Telegram
 177. Frick wires Carnegie stating that Mr. Roberts is all right, and that collections are fair and bank balances are good. November 25, 1890 Telegram
 188. Frick wires Carnegie telling him to cable Lauder to delay making drafts for tools purchased until after January 1st. December 9, 1890 Telegram
 190. Frick wires Carnegie on the ability to arrange with Mr. Newell tomorrow. Also, Hoffman of Philadelphia is in town, and Frick includes his upcoming schedule. December 9, 1890 Telegram
 194. Frick writes that Mr. [Charles] Schwab was informed of wages not being advanced at Edgar Thomson Steel Works. December 10, 1890 Typed letter Signed
 203. Frick returns Mr. Thurston's December 9th letter to Carnegie and writes that they do have an Emery testing machine at their 33rd Street mill that they use. December 16, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 215. Frick writes to Carnegie about his conversation with Mr. [Henry] Oliver regarding Pittsburgh & Western matters. December 22, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 224. Frick wires Carnegie on blast furnace men having notified [Charles] Schwab that they will strike unless their hours are reduced. Frick includes a suggested course of action. December 30, 1890 Telegram
 227. Frick wires Carnegie on Mr. Gayley and how he has written Carnegie. December 30, 1890 Telegram
 233. Frick includes a letter date on December 31 from their General Superintendent, and writes that he didn't find Mr. Lauder's report on file, and comments on manufacturing plans at Edgar Thomson. January 1, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 234. Frick includes correspondence between him and [Charles] Schwab and writes that the Sheriff has promised them protection. January 1, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 235. Frick wires Carnegie telling him that newspaper reports are exaggerated and that last night and this morning was quiet. January 2, 1891 Telegram
 244. Frick wires Carnegie telling him that things are quiet at Bessemer with no new developments. January 3, 1891 Telegram
 244. Frick wires Carnegie asking him to write the President to urge the appointment of James H. Reed as District Judge of U.S. Court of Western Pennsylvania. [Attached to previous correspondence.] January 3, 1891 
 247. Frick wires Carnegie telling him that things look favorable at Bessemer. January 5, 1891 Telegram
 252. Frick includes telegram from [Henry] Oliver on a price quote. January 9, 1891 Telegram
 253. Frick writes that he saw [Henry] Oliver last night and was told that the party is expected to purchase at full price. January 10, 1891 Telegram
 287. Frick writes to Carnegie on miscommunication about a price quote. January 21, 1891 Telegram
 318. Frick wires Carnegie about Mr. Mayer, who seems pleased with matters. February 10, 1891 Telegram
 330. Frick wires Carnegie on current business, a naval contract, and the piety matter. February 17, 1891 Telegram
 335. Frick wires Carnegie on the piety matter and the January [1891] net. February 23, 1891 Telegram
 363. Frick responds to Carnegie's telegram on Pittsburgh & Western stock. March 17, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 365. Frick wires Carnegie a telegram message from Mr. Lauder on Evans buying mixer patents for their price. March 18, 1891 Telegram
 366. Frick writes to Carnegie on Pittsburgh & Western and the common stock. March 18, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 387. Frick writes to Carnegie on how to make Keystone a department of Carnegie, Phipps, & Company. March 27, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 397. Frick writes on the purchase of Lassig Bridge Works and concentrating their business. March 30, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 402. Frick responds to Carnegie's comments on settling the difficulties in the coke regions, and writes on the current strike at Edgar Thomson. April 1, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 444. Frick wires Carnegie telling him that the strike continues, but other works are running well. May 20, 1891 Telegram
 450. Frick wires Carnegie telling him that they can purchase undivided half McClure at fair price, and asks if he approves. May 25, 1891 Telegram
 459. Frick wires Carnegie telling him that McClure is doubtful and that indebtedness is larger than represented. May 28, 1891 Telegram
 467. Frick wires Carnegie if he would accept governor's appointment as head of Worlds Fair Commission from Penna. June 8, 1891 Telegram
 468. Frick wires Carnegie on pending negotiations with McClure. June 8, 1891 Telegram
 475. Frick wires Carnegie on rail orders and [F.M.] Folger's visit to Homestead. June 17, 1891 Telegram
 481. Frick writes to Carnegie on the expiration of an option for Allegheny Bessemer Steel Company bonds given by William G. Park, and how Mr. Phipps would like to negotiate the sale of them. June 20, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 482. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message. June 22, 1891 Telegram
 504. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message. July 7, 1891 Telegram
 509. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message. July 9, 1891 Telegram
 520. Frick wires Carnegie on the possibility of splitting bonds between [John T.] Terry and themselves. Also, states that the armor plant will be ready in ten days. July 15, 1891 Telegram
 521. Frick wires Carnegie, telling him "It's a splendid start" and "perhaps this morning." July 16, 1891 Telegram
 525. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message. July 17, 1891 Telegram
 534. Frick wires Carnegie that tests are still being conducted for the government and that [F.M.] Folger would like to defer until definitive results are obtained. August 21, 1891 Telegram
 555. Frick writes on the agreement covering Sparrows Point, a court injunction against Philadelphia Company, and the status of Harveyized plates. September 28, 1891 Telegram
 635. Frick writes on reasons why Carnegie should increase the capital stock of Carnegie, Phipps, and Company. November 27, 1891 Autographed Letter Signed
 655. Partners extend congratulations, cordiality and best wishes for the new year to Carnegie and his wife. December 25, 1891 Telegram
 657. Frick writes on sending Mr. [James] Swank money from the Bessemer Association, installing long distance telephone lines to their principal cities, their Columbian exhibit, and Frick comments on Carnegie's interview with [Secretary of the Navy] Tracy. December 26, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 665. Frick writes on Mr. Ferguson's reasons as to why it would be a mistake to adopt the Alden plans. December 26, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 695. Frick wires Carnegie that they were slightly overbid by a real estate broker, but is confident that they will secure the farm. July 26, 1891 Telegram

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Series  III. Carnegie Company, 1900-1901 

Historical Background

The Carnegie Company was formally organized in New Jersey on March 24, 1900. The company owned the stock of the Carnegie Steel Company, Limited, a corporation formed to carry on the various steel and iron establishments, plants and properties in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, region. The Carnegie Company controlled the plants and properties which mined and manufactured coal, coke, iron, and steel. The Carnegie Company in total owned and controlled thirteen companies: Edgar Thomson Furnaces, Duquesne Furnaces, Carrie Furnaces, Lucy Furnaces, Edgar Thomas Steel Works, Duquesne Steel Works, Homestead Steel Works, Upper Union Mills, Lower Union Mills, Keystone Bridge Works, Youghiogheny Coke Works, Lorimer Coke Works, and Pittsburgh Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad. The Carnegie Company was formed by merger of Carnegie Steel Company, Limited, and the H.C. Frick Coke Company. The directors of the Carnegie Company were President Charles Schwab, Vice President Henry Phipps, Secretary Andrew M. Moreland, and William W. Blackburn. The company had an authorized capital of $160,000,000. The properties of this company constituted the largest aggregation of industries under one management in the world at the time.

The newly formed company continued to be competitive and superior by continually expanding and acquiring new resources, but, this expansion was closely watched by Carnegie’s rivals. The merger piqued the interest of J.P. Morgan, railroad magnate and chairman of Federal Steel Company who became aware that Carnegie’s expansion could ruin his steel interests. In December of 1900, Charles M. Schwab, president of the Carnegie Steel Company, was honored at a dinner that was held at the University Club in New York City. Many prominent businessmen like Andrew Carnegie, J.P. Morgan, and Standard Oil President, H.H. Rogers, attended the dinner. After the dinner, Schwab was asked to give a speech on his vision of the steel industry in the twentieth century. Schwab’s vision included the U.S. steel industry taking on foreign steelmakers by uniting firms and combining complementary operations while slashing costs across the board.

Morgan was so impressed by what Schwab envisioned that he asked to have a meeting with him. At first Schwab refused, but eventually agreed due to Morgan’s persistence. Both men met secretly to discuss buying out Carnegie’s shares. While Schwab met with Carnegie and eventually convinced him to sell, the principal architect of the deal was Elbert H. Gary, who became U. S. Steel's first chairman. Gary and Morgan bought Carnegie's steel company for $480,000,000 and combined it with their holdings in the Gary’s Federal Steel Company. Carnegie’s empire ended on February 25, 1901, when he agreed to sign an agreement to sell his company.

The combination of steel operations owned by Andrew Carnegie with Gary's Federal Steel Company became the nucleus of United States Steel, which also included American Steel & Wire Company, National Tube Company, American Bridge Company, Federal Steel Company, American Tin Plate Company, American Steel Hoop Company, American Sheet Steel Company, and several smaller companies. The United States Steel Corporation was incorporated on February 25, but was officially in business on April 1, 1901.

Scope and Content Notes

This series contains the records of the Carnegie Company for the years 1900 to 1901. Records include agreements, certificates, correspondence, memoranda, minutes, notes, financial statements, and monthly sales comparisons. The correspondence mostly contains original letters and copies to and from Henry Clay Frick. There are company statements that are from the office of the secretary and the accounting department.

The remaining material contains record books, labeled as “The Carnegie Company Organization Records.” These record books consist of the company charter, by-laws, Oaths and Certificates, and minutes of the first meeting. The other record book deals with company bond matters. The materials in this collection date from 1900 to 1901. Material related to this series can be found in Carnegie Steel Company Series and H.C. Frick Coke Company Series.

  BoxFolder
Accounting Department, September 1900, October 1900 91
  Folder
Agreement, February 4, 1901 2
  Folder
Business Merger, June 14, 1900 3
  Folder
Comparisons, April 30, 1900, May 1, 1900 4
  Folder
Correspondence, September 18, 1900-April 16, 1901 5
  Folder
Disposition of Stock, April 2, 1901 6
  Folder
Memoranda, April 1, 1900-April 22, 1901 7
  Folder
Minutes, April 2, 1900-May 8, 1900 8
  Folder
Minutes, March 15, 1901, undated 9
  Folder
Office of Secretary, April 1900-June 30, 1900 10
  Folder
Receipt Voucher, April 18, 1900 11
  Folder
Record book, “The Carnegie Company Organization Records,” 1900 12
  Folder
Record book, Carnegie Company Bond, November 21, 1900-March 18, 1901 13
  Folder
By-Laws, March 27, 1900 14
  Folder
Charter, undated 15
  Folder
Collateral Deed of Trust, April 2, 1900 16

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Series  IV. Carnegie Steel Company, 1892-1900 

Historical Background

Andrew Carnegie placed industrialist Henry Clay Frick in charge of Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited beginning in 1881. By 1892, Frick was advising Carnegie to merge Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited and Carnegie, Phipps & Company, Limited into one large company. The restructuring of these companies created Carnegie Steel Company, Limited on June 30, 1892. Frick was named chairman of the newly formed company. This reorganization helped create more efficiency between Carnegie’s many companies. The capital of the reorganization was $25 million, with Andrew Carnegie controlling more than half of the company’s interests.

The same day that the Carnegie Steel Company came into existence, a labor strike occurred at the Homestead Steel Works in Homestead, Pennsylvania. Labor troubles at Homestead were common during the period; the previous owners sold the works to Carnegie in 1883 specifically because they had grown tired of dealing with the increasing labor problems. Tension arose markedly when Frick attempted to cut the wages of the steel workers. He then began closing down his open hearth and armor-plate mill on the evening of June 28th, locking out 1,100 men. Frick was given full authority over Carnegie’s plants since Carnegie had just departed for a lengthy vacation. When no collective bargaining agreement was reached on June 29th, Frick determined to break the union, locked the rest of the employees out of the plant. A tall barbed wire topped fence, ordered by Frick, was erected to completely seal out the workers from the plant. Frick announced he would no longer negotiate with the union; now he would only deal with workers individually. As a result, union leaders were willing to concede on almost every level except on the dissolution of the workers union.

Frick, searching for a resolution to break the strike, turned to the enforcers he had employed previously, the Pinkerton National Detective Agency's private security guard. The Pinkertons, as they were commonly referred, were frequently used by industrialists of the era to protect their mills and break striking workers. At midnight on July 5th, tugboats pulled barges carrying hundreds of Pinkerton detectives armed with rifles up the Monongahela River. The boats were spotted by the strikers and a large crowd gathered to meet them. As the guards tried to land, a battle ensued. The skirmish resulted in the Pinkerton guards’ surrender and the death of sixteen men: seven Pinkertons and nine strikers. To restore order, the Pennsylvania National Guard entered Homestead on July 12th to regain control over the mill and town. Nearly two weeks later, there was a failed assassination attempt against Frick by anarchist Alexander Berkman. Frick soon recovered and immediately returned to work. By the end November 1892, the strike matters had dissolved with no real resolution. The union had been broken, workers returned to the mill, and Carnegie’s companies continued to dominate the steel industry.

During the company’s years of growth, tensions began to rise between Carnegie and Frick. In 1899, Frick and other company associates tried to buy out Carnegie, but were unsuccessful. In 1900, Carnegie and Frick had disagreements on the price of coke. When Frick refused Carnegie’s price, Carnegie threatened to evoke the Iron Clad Agreement against him. The Iron Clad Agreement stated that a withdrawing partner would only get the book-value payout of his shares. A partner could also be forced out upon a three-quarters partners’ vote. The agreement however did not apply to Carnegie as he owned more than half the stock. Frick still refused and Carnegie persuaded the board to enforce the agreement against him.

Frick decided to take the matter to court. In February of 1900, he filed suit against the Carnegie Steel Company. Instead of settling the feud in court, both men were willing to negotiate. Both parties met at Carnegie’s house in New York City and then later in Atlantic City. An agreement was made and a settlement proceeded. Carnegie bought out Frick and went on to combine the H.C. Frick Coke Company and Carnegie Steel Company, Limited to form the Carnegie Company. The Carnegie Steel Company, at its peak, operated a total of eight steel mills in the Pittsburgh region.

Scope and Content Notes

This series contains administrative records, correspondence, meeting minutes, financial statements, scrapbooks, and letterpress copybooks pertaining to the operation of Carnegie Steel Company, Limited. The series is further broken down into three subseries: Administrative Records, Iron Clad Agreement, and Scrapbooks. The records span from 1887 to 1901; however the majority of the materials are from 1892 to 1900. Also, due to size, there are additional records in the Maps and Architectural Drawings Series. Records contain maps, drawings, and a reproduction of company properties and equipment. Additional material regarding the Homestead steel strike and work relations could be found in the H.C. Frick and Andrew Carnegie Correspondence Series.

Related Material

Additional letterpress copybooks that contain outgoing correspondence from Henry Clay Frick to Andrew Carnegie can also be found in Series IX. Correspondence, 1883-1919, Subseries 1. Andrew Carnegie, 1883-1912. Abstracts and digitized contents are available.

Subseries  1. Administrative Records, 1892-1900 

Scope and Content Notes

The administrative records includes company correspondence and legal material pertaining to Henry Clay Frick vs. the Carnegie Steel Company, Limited, as well as Board of Managers meeting minutes, Proposal to Purchase, and H.C. Frick Letterpress Copybook.

The company correspondence consists of incoming original letters, telegrams, and a letterpress copybooks. Correspondences contain incoming letters from the company’s superintendents, sale agents, treasurer, and other businessmen for the years of July 1892 to March 1900. Some of these letters are stamped “answered.” The answered letters can be found in the letterpress copybooks in this series and the H.C. Frick Coke Company Series. Materials for the suit mostly consist of court briefs and memoranda. Memoranda highlight the events leading up to the suit include questions asked by Frick’s attorney John Johnson, and other legal aspects of similar court cases. The meeting minutes date from 1895 to 1900 and pertain to the company shareholders, operating department, and Board of Managers.

Records pertaining to a “Proposal to Purchase” the Carnegie Steel Company, Limited in 1899 consist of correspondence, telegrams, typescript copies of letters, and memoranda related to the proposed sale of the company. Frick, Henry Phipps, and William H. Moore created a plan to buy out Carnegie and form a new company. They confronted Carnegie with a proposal and a good faith deposit of $1,700,000. When the deadline came to an end, the deal was off and Carnegie pocketed the deposit. Most of the letters in the correspondence are from A.L. Schoonmaker, a steel agent for Carnegie to Frick.

The letterpress copybooks in this series contain the five volumes of Frick’s outgoing correspondence from the Company’s Board of Manager Chairman. Also included in these record books are some statements and memorandum. The copybooks date from January 12, 1892 to March 12, 1900.

The remaining materials consist of documents pertaining to the company’s net earnings, profit and losses, partner’s accounts, wages and salaries, and stock of materials. Also included are statements of monthly products and outbound material for all works under Carnegie Steel. The materials in this subseries date from 1892 to 1900.

  BoxFolder
Agreements, July 1, 1892, February 20, 1893-March 28, 1900 101
  Folder
Correspondence, July 7, 1892-August 5, 1893 2
  Folder
Correspondence, August 18, 1893-March 31, 1897 3
  Folder
Correspondence, August 20, 1897-March 23, 1900 4
  Folder
Correspondence, undated 5
  Folder
Formation, June 30, 1892, July 1, 1892 6
  Folder
H.C. Frick vs. Carnegie Steel Company, Ltd., March 1900 7
  Folder
H.C. Frick vs. Carnegie Steel Company, Ltd., 1900 8
  Folder
H.C. Frick vs. Carnegie Steel Company, Ltd., undated 9
  Folder
Memoranda of Conversations, May 12-July 1, 1896 10
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, May 9, 1895-November 8, 1898 11
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 16, 1899-March 30, 1900 12
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, September 1, 1899-January 6, 1900 13
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, March 31, 1900 14
  Folder
List of Shareholders, July 1, 1892-January 1, 1900 15
  Folder
Basic Open Hearth Steel, June 14, 1895 16
  Folder
Reports, April 14, 1899, undated 17
  Folder
Merger of Carnegie Steel Company, Ltd. and H.C. Frick Coke Co., July 1, 1892-June 14, 1900 18
  Folder
Statement regarding Carnegie Steel Company, Ltd. and Debts Owed by Railway Companies 19
  Folder
Report on the Book Value of Stocks 20
  Box
Statements of Monthly Products and Outbound Materials for All Works, 1899 14
  Box
Total Sales of Pig Iron Record Book, November 2, 1893-December 11, 1899 15
  BoxFolder
Proposal to Purchase, Agreements, April 24, 1899, May 19, 1899 161
  Folder
Proposal to Purchase, Correspondence, May 6, 1899-July 25, 1899 2
  Folder
Proposal to Purchase, Memo, 1899 3
  Folder
Proposal to Purchase, Telegrams, May 4, 1899-July 1899 4
  Folder
Proposal to Purchase, Typescript Copies of Letters, May 4, 1899-November 18, 1899 5
  Folder
Proposal to Purchase, Typescript Letter, undated 6
  Folder
Proposal to Purchase, Copy of Power of Attorney, April 24, 1899 7
  Folder
Statements, November 30, 1892-December 31, 1896 8
  Folder
Statements, November 1, 1897-September 19, 1898 9
  Folder
Statements, January 25, 1899-September 23, 1899 10
  Folder
Statements, October 13, 1899-December 13, 1899 11
  Folder
Statements, January 2, 1900-March 31, 1900 12
  Folder
Statements and Notes, 1893, 1896, 1900 13
  Folder
By-Laws and Organization, July 1, 1892, December 31, 1895 14
  Folder
Interest in Option, 1899 15

Section: H.C. Frick Letterpress Copybooks, 1892-1899 

Scope and Content Notes

The letterpress copybooks comprises copies of outgoing correspondence from H.C. Frick to numerous individuals. Due to the significance of Frick's correspondence with Andrew Carnegie in particular, abstracts were created for these specific letters by History undergraduate students interning at the Archives Service Center. The numbering besides each item below refers to the page number in the copybook where the letter can be found.

There are no abstracts for the contents of the letterpress copybook dated May 4-June 2, 1899 (Box 13 Volume 2) since the correspondence mostly pertains to matters regarding a buyout option that Frick, Henry Phipps, and William H. Moore created for Carnegie.

  BoxVolume
H.C. Frick Letterpress Copybook, January 12, 1892-February 4, 1893 111
 1. Frick alerts Carnegie on a letter arriving from Mr. Knox on his opinion of the government's armor plate contract. Also, Frick thinks the Secretary should visit Homestead to withdrawal all doubts. January 12, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Frick wires Carnegie that they won. January 16, 1892 Telegram
 11. Frick writes on meeting with Mr. [Otis] Childs on the New Beam Mill matter and on arranging for the managers to visit Duquesne to select a new furnace location. February 2, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 31. Frick wires Carnegie his response to Carnegie's April 4th telegram. Frick declines Carnegie's invitation to stay with him. April 4, 1892 Telegram
 43. Frick writes that he received Carnegie's telegram wishing for all papers related to the Thomas patent that mention Mr. Kennedy's letter. Frick will be sending the papers; however, Mr. Kennedy's letter is missing. April 9, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 59. Frick wires Carnegie on the Beam Mill running successfully, [Otis] Childs visiting Bethlehem, Judge Reed obtaining Newell's consent in Cleveland, [Ohio], and Dillon winning a decisive victory. April 21, 1892 Telegram
 75. Frick wires Carnegie that [William] Shinn died this morning and certificates of consolidation should reach him by the 12th. May 5, 1892 Telegram
 77. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message. May 6, 1892 Telegram
 97. Frick wires Carnegie on successful test results for the four-inch New York armor. May 26, 1892 Telegram
 98. Frick wires Carnegie on the completion of signed papers. May 30, 1892 Telegram
 105. Frick wires Carnegie on the death of Borntraeger's wife. June 7, 1892 Telegram
 106. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message. June 7, 1892 Telegram
 123. Frick writes on Gayley and Schwab's disappointment after reading Carnegie's letter about the addition to the Carnegie Library at Braddock. June 16, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 125. Frick wires Carnegie on asking Whitworths for price on 10,000 ton press. June 16, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 130. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message. June 22, 1892 Telegram
 141. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message. July 4, 1892 Cablegram
 145. Frick wires Carnegie about "small plunge," and that their position will work out favorably. July 7, 1892 Telegram
 154. Frick wires Carnegie on "small plunge," and says the sentiment is with them and the state guard will be at "plunge" soon. July 11, 1892 Telegram
 165. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message, and also states that warrants have been issued for murder charges. July 18, 1892 Telegram
 701. Frick writes on the Homestead strike, the arrival of Pinkerton men, strike breakers, and newspaper sympathy for the strikers. July 4, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
  Volume
H.C. Frick Letterpress Copybook, February 6-November 27, 1893 2
 37. Frick wires Carnegie about canceling his trip to Bethlehem because Secretary [of the Navy Tracey ] has called him to Washington, [D.C]. February 24, 1893 Telegram
 79. Frick wires Carnegie asking him if he can make it to Washington [D.C.] for a plate testing. May 9, 1893 Telegram
 671. Frick wires Carnegie about Mr. Clarke declining their offer. November 20, 1893 Telegram
 686. Frick wires Carnegie on a scheduled meeting for Friday when papers will be ready. November 21, 1893 Telegram
  BoxVolume
H.C. Frick Letterpress Copybook, November 27, 1893-October 22, 1894 121
 79. Frick wires Carnegie a Christmas and New Years greetings. December 25, 1893 Telegram
  Volume
H.C. Frick Letterpress Copybook, October 23, 1894-February 16, 1897 2
 576. Frick wires Carnegie on making a contract with Badly and Balance, with Board approval. March 2, 1896 Telegram
 578. Frick wires Carnegie asking him to come to St. Augustine [Fla] to meet with Earnest. March 4, 1896 Telegram
 644. Frick writes on including a letter from Mr. Dalzell, and on Mr. Curry thinking it would be a mistake to aim for higher duty on Ferro Manganese. December 16, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 648. Frick writes a response to [Frank] Thomson's propositions. December 17, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 648. Carnegie writes that he wishes [Frank] Thomson would have sent Frick a complete statement, and includes Frick's reply. December 18, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
  BoxVolume
H.C. Frick Letterpress Copybook, February 16, 1897-December 4, 1899 131
  Volume
H.C. Frick Letterpress Copybook, May 4-June 2, 1899 2

Subseries  2. Iron Clad Agreement, 1887-1900 

Scope and Content Notes

In 1887, the death of a prominent associate of the Carnegie Brothers & Company, Ltd., led to the first Iron Clad Agreement. The crux of the agreement said that when a shareholder dies or leaves the company, the remaining partners can purchase the person’s holdings back at book value, instead of the market value. This subseries contains the copies of three iron clad agreements that were created. The second and third agreements were drawn up in 1892 and 1897. Other materials pertaining to the Iron Clad Agreements consist of correspondence, lists, notes, memoranda, and notices dating from 1896 to 1900. The correspondence in this subseries are typescript copies, handwritten, original, and letter copies. Most of the typescript copies are outgoing from Frick. Some of the incoming letters to Frick are from F.T.F. Lovejoy, Secretary of Carnegie Steel Company, Ltd.; A.M. Moreland, Secretary of Carnegie Steel Company, Ltd.; and Millard Hunsiker, a personal friend of Frick. The materials in this subseries date from 1887 to 1900.

  BoxFolder
Copy of Iron Clad Agreement, 1887 1616
Online
  Folder
Copy of Iron Clad Agreement, July 1, 1892 17
Online
  Folder
Copy of Iron Clad Agreement, September 1, 1897 18
Online
  Folder
Correspondence, June 15, 1896-February 15, 1900 19
Online
  Folder
Signed Members List, December 26, 1899 20
  Folder
Memoranda, January 8, 1900 21
  Folder
Memoranda and Notes, January 12-17, 1900 22
  Folder
Notices, January 10-29, 1900 23
  BoxVolume
H.C. Frick Letterpress Copybook, Iron Clad Agreement, June 10, 1898-March 12, 1900 171
 49. Frick writes on making the Iron Clad Agreement more legally binding. June 10, 1898 Typescript copy

Subseries  3. Scrapbooks, 1892-1900 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries contains newspaper clipping scrapbooks that were maintained by the Carnegie Steel Company and mainly cover news reporting at the time of the Homestead steel strike, riot, aftermath, and other subsequent events. The material highlighted the strikes and riots (Volume 1); assassination attempt (Volume 1 and 2); nonunion, union, and strikers (Volume 3 and 4); Private W.L. Iams Case (Volume 4); poisoning conspiracy (Volume 4 and 5); and Hugh O’Donnell (Volume 2 and 5). Only Volumes 1 and 2 are indexed.

Most of the scrapbooks are day-by-day accounts of specific events related to the company. Clippings are primarily from local and national presses, but there is some international coverage as well. Some of the local periodicals include the Pittsburgh Leader, Pittsburgh Dispatch, and the Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette. Some of the national clippings include the Boston Globe,   Boston News,  Chicago Globe,   Post Dispatch (St. Louis),  Oregonian (Portland, Oregon), and the   New York Tribune. Examples of the international newspapers include the  Manchester Guardian,  The Echo (London), and  The Times (London). The scrapbooks also include some journal articles from  The Illustrated American,  Harper’s Weekly, and  Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Weekly.

Volumes 6 through 8 contain articles pertaining to the Frick-Carnegie law suit, plot to free attempted assassin Alexander Berkman, and Frick Building construction. There are also clippings on J. P Morgan, Philander C. Knox, Henry Phipps, and Charles M. Schwab. The majority of articles are from the New York Sun. Volume 9 documents the company’s history in an unbound draft proof. The scrapbooks date from July 1892 to December 1900.

  BoxVolume
The Carnegie Steel Company, Ltd., Strike and Riot of 1892, June 2-July 23, 1892 181
Online
  BoxVolume
The Carnegie Steel Company, Ltd., Strike and Riot of 1892, July 23-August 18, 1892 192
Online
  BoxVolume
The Carnegie Steel Company, Ltd., Strike and Riot of 1892, August 16-October 27, 1892 203
Online
  BoxVolume
The Carnegie Steel Company, Ltd., Strike and Riot of 1892-1893, October 27, 1892-January 19, 1893 214
Online
  BoxVolume
The Carnegie Steel Company, Ltd., January 19, 1893-April 18, 1894 225
Online
  BoxVolume
Newspaper Clippings, July 6, 1892-September 11, 1892 236
  BoxVolume
Newspaper Clippings, January 3, 1900-October 31, 1901 247
  BoxVolume
Newspaper Clippings, January 10-December 28, 1900 258
  BoxVolume
The History of the Carnegie Steel Company Draft Proofs, (unbound), 1903 269

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Series  V. Carnegie, Phipps & Company, Limited, 1888-1897 

Historical Background

In 1883, the Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited purchased Homestead Steel Works from Pittsburgh Bessemer Steel Company in Homestead, Pennsylvania. Carnegie then bought back the Lucy Furnaces from Wilson, Walker & Company and with the mill at Homestead formed the Carnegie, Phipps, & Company, Limited on January 1, 1886. Carnegie and his partners now owned all the steel production in Homestead. The Carnegie firms in Pittsburgh at this time were organized into two separate companies, each owned by the same group of partners. Carnegie, Phipps & Company, Limited owned Homestead Steel Works while Carnegie Brothers & Company owned the Edgar Thomson steel mill. Carnegie created two separate chairman positions placing William L. Abbott as chairman of the board for Carnegie and Phipps & Company, Limited and Henry Clay Frick as chairman of Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited.

The purchase of the Homestead Steel Works helped eliminate one of Carnegie’s biggest rivals, but it also came with a dilemma. Labor problems plagued the mill even when it was owned by the Pittsburgh Bessemer Steel Company. In 1882, there were labor issues that resulted in a strike that lasted for ten weeks. A few weeks after the settlement, unions were threatening another strike. When Carnegie bought the mill, the labor issues did not improve. In 1889, labor relations suffered and another strike ensued. Although Abbott was a knowledgeable businessman who had worked his way up in Carnegie’s various companies, he was inexperienced in dealing with strike matters. Abbott ignored Carnegie’s advice to keep the Homestead mill shutdown until the strikers agreed to the company’s terms. Carnegie urged Abbott to stand firm, but instead he compromised and settled the strike dispute. A new contract was signed which would expire on July 1, 1892. On July 1, 1892, Carnegie Brothers and Company, Limited bought the Carnegie, Phipps & Company, Limited and both were consolidated into the Carnegie Steel Company, Limited.

Scope and Content Notes

This series contains records of the Carnegie, Phipps & Company, Limited. The majority of the material consists of correspondence, memoranda, reports, statements, and summaries that pertain to armor plate production. In 1890, the Homestead Works signed an armor plate contract with the United States government. The correspondence contains letters mostly from the Secretary of Carnegie, Phipps, and Company, Limited, Otis H. Childs to B.F. Tracy, Secretary of the U.S. Navy, as well as Commodore William M. Fogler, Chief of Bureau of Ordnance for the U.S. Navy.

Childs also created weekly armor reports for Henry Clay Frick, the company’s chairman. Most of the reports deal with the shipment of armor, but there are a few reports that pertain to the Bethlehem Iron Company. Childs reported back to Frick on Bethlehem’s equipment and armor production. In 1892, both Bethlehem Iron Company and Homestead Steel Works had contracts with the government to produce armor belts for naval ships.

Also included in this series are statements, shipments, product orders, and monthly reports of work completed at the armor plate department. Folders one, five, six, and seven contain materials that were created when the company was Carnegie, Phipps, and Company, Limited., but also extend into the Carnegie Steel Company, Limited. The materials in this series date from 1887 to 1893. Additional files relating to Carnegie, Phipps, & Company, Limited, may be found in Carnegie Steel Company, Limited Series.

  BoxFolder
Bids, December 16, 1892 271
  Folder
List of Shareholders, December 31, 1887, June 30, 1897 2
  Folder
Memoranda, October 15, 1891-November 14, 1892 3
  Folder
Reports, September 12, 1891-May 23, 1892 4
  Folder
Reports, June 14, 1892-February 17, 1893 5
  Folder
Statements, 1888-1892 6
  Folder
Summaries, April 30, 1892-January 31, 1893 7
  Folder
Correspondence, November 13, 1889-April 12, 1892 8
  Folder
Correspondence, April 15-May 11, 1892 9
  Folder
Correspondence, May 18-June 29, 1892 10

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Series  VI. Cerro de Pasco Corporations, 1901-1925 

Historical Background

During Henry Clay Frick’s career, he become oncreasingly interested in mining non-ferrous metals such as copper and silver. Frick soon became interested in a copper mine in Cerro de Pasco, Peru. The region of Cerro de Pasco was known for its rich deposits in minerals, most notably silver. When the silver was exhausted in the region in the late nineteenth century, copper was the next largest mineral mined. The Cerro de Pasco Corporation was comprised of three separate companies including an investment firm, mining company and railway development company, all bearing the Cerro de Pasco name. The Cerro de Pasco Corporation began with the investment firm supported by a wealthy New York syndicate compromised of J.P. Morgan, Hamilton Mcknown, H.M. Twombly, Alfred McCune, and Frick. Unlike other business ventures, Frick kept his involvement in the corporation to a minimum.

In 1887, the New York syndicate started to evaluate the copper reserves in Cerro de Pasco. By 1900 mining engineer and syndicate partner, William Van Slooten became impressed with the potential prospects of the area. He persuaded fellow mine engineers James B.A. Haggin and James McFarlane, along with mine promoter Alfred W. McCunne, to go to Cerro de Pasco and evaluate the mining prospects of the area. Confident in the area’s potential, Haggins went into a Cerro de Pasco partnership with McCunne. They developed and promoted the idea of the “Peruvian Mining Project” to entice American investors. A preliminary agreement made for the individuals wishing to participate in a “Peruvian Mining Project” was to form a “Mining Development Company.” The purpose of this company was to “purchase, development, and equip various mining claims and properties in the Cerro de Pasco region. The company had the rights to locations, coal ledges and deposits, water and tunnel access, land and water transportation and railway lines.”

The Cerro de Pasco Corporations were formally organized in 1901 by Haggin who was backed by the wealthy New York syndicate. The Cerro de Pasco Corporation started production in 1902 for the mining of copper. In the same year, the Cerro de Pasco Mining Company bought the majority of the mining concessions in the area, while also buying railroad rights, to form the Cerro de Pasco Railway Company. This corporation became the largest U.S. investor in Peru in the twentieth century. The Investment firm of the Cerro de Pasco Corporation dissolved in late 1915 and the Cerro de Pasco Copper Corporation was formed by absorbing the mining and railroad companies. A number of the original investors were a part of the new corporation.

Scope and Content Notes

This series contains incoming and outgoing correspondence, reports, legal agreements, and financial materials of the Cerro de Pasco Corporations. This series contains four subseries: Correspondence, Reports, Financial Material, and Administrative Records. The correspondence, written mostly to Frick, relates to the business activities of all of the Cerro de Pasco companies. The correspondences of the investment firm, mining company and railroad development company have not been separated. A small number of outgoing letters from Frick can be found among the correspondence and some of these letters state that a copy can be found in a letterpress book. Correspondence also includes coded telegrams sent from Peru to Frick. Included with the telegrams is a key to assist in deciphering what is written in the telegrams.

The Reports Subseries describes Cerro de Pasco and its surrounding areas in terms of natural resources, labor, transportation, and area projected productivity. These reports were sent from Peru between 1902 and 1904 during the initial phases of business in the region. Reports concerning financial matters have been placed with the Financial Materials subseries that consists of Treasurer’s reports, which note the establishment of the mining and railway companies in South American, as well as financial statements and agreements. The administrative records date from 1902 to 1919 and document the business aspects of the Cerro de Pasco Corporations. The majority of materials are agreements; however, additional information on annual meetings and newspaper clippings can be also be found. The documents in this series date from 1901 to 1925.

Subseries  1. Correspondence, 1901-1925 

Scope and Content Notes

The Correspondence Subseries contains the incoming and outgoing letters documenting the business activities of the Cerro de Pasco Corporations. Many of the letters from the years 1902 to 1904 describe in detail the mining prospects, railway progress, employees, and travel to and from Cerro de Pasco. Many letters address business announcements of annual meetings or payments on stock. Other correspondence refers to environmental or political problems, such as the bubonic plague, yellow fever of 1904, the 1904 earthquake, and an outbreak of a regional war in 1915. Although much of the correspondence is written to Frick from the president of the companies J.B. Haggin, Frick was copied on a number of other letters concerning the individual companies. There is also correspondence concerning the death and settlement procedures of Frick’s estate relative to the Cerro de Pasco investment dating from 1920. At Frick’s death in 1919, his total investment in Cerro de Pasco was worth approximately $4,570,000 dollars. The materials in this subseries date from 1901 to 1925.

  BoxFolder
Correspondence, November 1901-September 1902 281
  Folder
Correspondence, October 1902 2
  Folder
Correspondence, November 1902 3
  Folder
Correspondence, December 1902 4
  Folder
Correspondence, January-May 1903 5
  Folder
Correspondence, June-December 1903 6
  Folder
Correspondence, January-March 1904 7
  Folder
Correspondence, March-April 1904 8
  Folder
Correspondence, May-August 1904 9
  Folder
Correspondence, September-December 1904 10
  Folder
Correspondence, January-April 1905 11
  Folder
Correspondence, May-July 1905 12
  Folder
Correspondence, August-December 1905 13
  Folder
Correspondence, January-March 1906 14
  Folder
Correspondence, April-June 1906 15
  Folder
Correspondence, July-December 1906 16
  BoxFolder
Correspondence, 1907 291
  Folder
Correspondence, 1908 2
  Folder
Correspondence, 1909 3
  Folder
Correspondence, 1910-1911 4
  Folder
Correspondence, 1912 5
  Folder
Correspondence, 1913 6
  Folder
Correspondence, 1914 7
  Folder
Correspondence, 1915-1916 8
  Folder
Correspondence, 1917 9
  Folder
Correspondence, 1924-1925 10
  Folder
Correspondence, telegrams, 1904-1906 11

Subseries  2. Reports, 1902-1905 

Scope and Content Notes

Reports in this subseries regard the condition of Cerro de Pasco future business prospects in mining and railway production. The reports discuss issues of transportation, natural resources, labor, and food for the region. These reports give an American view of the Cerro de Pasco region in the early twentieth century. The reports in this subseries date from 1902 to 1905.

  Folder
Reports, Mining, April 1904-July 1905 12
  Folder
Reports, Copper Mining, undated 13
  Folder
Reports, Natural Resources, April 10, 1902 14
  Folder
Reports, “The Copper Handbook” Excerpt, Vol. III, undated 15
  Folder
Reports, Coal and Iron in Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico, J.A. Potter, 1901 16

Subseries  3. Financial Material, 1903-1917 

Scope and Content Notes

Material in this subseries documents the financial concerns of the Cerro de Pasco companies. Included are Cerro de Pasco Investment Company Treasurer’s reports, stock information, and financial statements for both the Cerro de Pasco and Morococha Mining Companies. The early Treasurer’s reports include information on the railway and mining companies and provide expenses for the building of mines, coke plants, and smelters. Morococha Mining Company financial statements are also found with these materials. The Cerro de Pasco Copper Corporation took over Morococha Mining Company prior to 1915. Receipts for payments on capital stock are also located in this subseries. The materials in this subseries date from November 1903 to June 1917.

  BoxFolder
Treasurer’s Report, November 1903 301
  Folder
Treasurer’s Report, May-July 1905 2
  Folder
Treasurer’s Report, August-October 1905 3
  Folder
Treasurer’s Report, November-December 1905 4
  Folder
Treasurer’s Report, January-March 1906 5
  Folder
Treasurer’s Report, April-May, 1906 6
  Folder
Treasurer’s Report, July, September-December 1906 7
  Folder
Treasurer’s Report, (intermittent), 1907 8
  Folder
Treasurer’s Report, 1908 9
  Folder
Treasurer’s Report, 1909 10
  Folder
Treasurer’s Report, (intermittent), 1910 11
  Folder
Treasurer’s Report, 1911 12
  Folder
Treasurer’s Report, January-December 1912 13
  Folder
Financial Statement, Cerro de Pasco, 1913 14
  Folder
Financial Statement, Cerro de Pasco, (intermittent), 1914 15
  Folder
Financial Statement, Cerro de Pasco, (intermittent), 1915 16
  Folder
Financial Statement, Morococha Mining Company, 1913 17
  Folder
Financial Statement, Morococha Mining Company, (intermittent), 1914 18
  Folder
Financial Statement, Morococha Mining Company, (intermittent), 1915 19
  BoxFolder
Outstanding Drafts, September 1907-December, (intermittent), 1908 311
  Folder
Outstanding Drafts, 1909 2
  Folder
Outstanding Drafts, 1910 3
  Folder
Outstanding Drafts, 1911 4
  Folder
Outstanding Drafts, 1912 5
  Folder
Outstanding Drafts, 1913 6
  Folder
Outstanding Drafts, January-May 1914 7
  Folder
Stock, April 1905 8
  Folder
Stock, May 1906 9
  Folder
Stock, October 1909 10
  Folder
Stock, July 1911 11
  Folder
Stock, November 1915 12
  Folder
Stock, June 1917 13
  Folder
Disbursements, June 1901-June 1902 14
  Folder
Disbursements, June 1902-December 1902 15
  Folder
Disbursements, December 1902-May 1903 16
  Folder
Disbursements, Estimated, October 1904 17
  Folder
Interest Calculations, 1908 18
  Folder
Receipts, 1902-1905 19
  Folder
Receipts and Expenses, June 1906 20

Subseries  4. Administrative Records, 1902-1919 

Scope and Content Notes

Material in this subseries relates to the business and administrative aspects of the Cerro de Pasco companies. The majority of the materials are agreements, however, additional information on annual meetings, and newspaper clippings concerning the Cerro de Pasco companies can also be found. The materials in this subseries date from 1902 to 1919.

  Folder
Agreements, Preliminary, 1902 21
  Folder
Agreements, A.W. McCune, 1905-1912 22
  Folder
Agreements, James McFarlane, 1907-1913 23
  Folder
Agreements, R.H. Channing, Jr., 1906 24
  Folder
Agreements, Loans, 1905 25
  Folder
Agreements, Loans, 1906 26
  Folder
Agreements, Guarantee of payment, 1908 27
  Folder
Agreements, Sinking Fund, March 1912 28
  BoxFolder
Annual Meeting, Announcements, 1916-1919 321
  Folder
Annual Meeting, Minutes, June 1905 2
  Folder
Annual Report, 1918 3
  Folder
Newspaper Clippings, 1915-1917 4
  Folder
Newspaper Excerpts, El Commercio, November-December 1902 5
  Folder
Financial Outline, March 1909 6
  Folder
Morococha District Properties, 1905 7
  Folder
Advertisement, November 1915 8
  Folder
Administrative Notes, undated 9

Return to Table of Contents »


Series  VII. Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company, 1901-1904 

Historical Background

Henry Clay Frick’s interest in Clairton, Pa., began when he prospected and chose the land in the late 1890s for its convenience to various water and railroad transportation networks and the potential profitability as a site for extensive industries. Frick purchased 700 acres in Clairton, from the original owners James P. Wylie, Samuel P. Lange and other small plot owners. The land was located along the bank of the Monongahela River near the extensive Clairton Steel Company plant. Frick conveyed the land to the St. Clair Improvement Company on June 14, 1901. By July 26th of that year, plans for a large manufacturing plant, rental lots, and houses were submitted to the public for purchase.

The Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company purchased the land from the St. Clair Improvement Company to build their facilities. The company incorporated on August 5, 1901 with a purposed mission of “mining clays, sand and stone; manufacturing the same into building materials and other articles of commerce… and selling said clays, sand and stone in crude or manufactured form.” The first major stockholders in the company were Reuben Miller, Jr. and Charles E. Clapp. However, within a year new stockholders would join the company, including William H. Smith, a business associate of Henry Clay Frick, and A.G. Wilson, a key player in the sale of the Clairton Street Railway Company. The St. Clair Improvement Company also owned a large portion of shares after that first year.

By 1904 the Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company experienced financial hardships. A letter to the stockholders explained that, “the affairs of the Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company have reached a climax. The banks have refused to renew notes….” It also goes on to provide reasons for the company’s failure since the business was not located on the main railway line and the town was not building at a rate that the company could produce brick. In July of that year, the company when into foreclosure and was turned over to D.W. Dunlevy. By October, Dunlevy had sold the Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company property at auction.

Scope and Content Notes

The series is divided into four subseries: Correspondence, Financial Material, Administrative Records, and Bound Volumes. The Correspondence Subseries contains mostly incoming correspondence of the Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company, along with a few outgoing letters. Much of the subject matter concerns business activities, including ordering and shipping of materials. The Financial Material subseries deals with the financial concerns of the Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company and includes balance sheets, weekly reports, receipts and bills, and order forms. Materials in the Administrative Records subseries consist of information on meetings, federal taxes, contracts, and agreements for the Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company. The Bound Volumes subseries documents the financial activities of the Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company and include a ledger, journal, letterpress copybook, meeting minutes, and bank books. The delivery book provides information on where bricks were sent, number of bricks sent, and the purchase price. The materials in this series date from 1901 to 1904.

Note: Letters to Reuben Miller can be found in the H.C. Frick Coke Company letterpress copybooks. He was president of Crescent Steel Company and Bank of Pittsburgh. However, the records of the Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company reveal that there is also a Reuben Miller, Sr. and it cannot be determined which Reuben Miller Frick associated with at the H.C. Frick Coke Company.

Subseries  1. Correspondence, 1901-1904 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries contains the majority of incoming correspondence of the Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company, although some outgoing letters can be found. Much of the subject matter concerns business activities, including ordering and shipping of materials. Companies that corresponded with Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company include the Standard Dry Kiln Company, C & A Potts &Company, and Crucible Steel Company of America. Also, each December correspondence exists from the Department of the Interior correspondence requesting clay production from the company for that year. For the year 1904, the majority of the correspondence concerns late payments and potential action brought by companies if Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company did not remit payment. Any undated correspondence is placed in Folder 14. The materials in this subseries date from July 1901 to December 1904.

  BoxFolder
Correspondence, July 18-September 30, 1901 331
  Folder
Correspondence, October 9-December 31, 1901 2
  Folder
Correspondence, January 6-February 13, 1902 3
  Folder
Correspondence, March 3-April 26, 1902 4
  Folder
Correspondence, May 6-June 25, 1902 5
  Folder
Correspondence, July 2-August 19, 1902 6
  Folder
Correspondence, September 12-December 29, 1902 7
  Folder
Correspondence, January 1-February 10, 1903 8
  Folder
Correspondence, March 4-November 28, 1903 9
  Folder
Correspondence, December 3-December 28, 1903 10
  Folder
Correspondence, January 1-February 23, 1904 11
  Folder
Correspondence, March 4-May 27, 1904 12
  Folder
Correspondence, June 1-December 17, 1904 13
  Folder
Correspondence, udated 14
  Folder
Letterpress Copybook, January 11, 1904-July 7, 1904 15

Subseries  2. Financial Material, 1901-1904 

Scope and Content Notes

The materials in this subseries concern the financial dealings of the Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company. Materials include balance sheets, weekly reports, receipts, bills, voucher records, delivery statements, accounts payable vouchers, and order forms. The weekly reports are intermittent and handwritten. This subseries also includes delivery statements of brick orders placed from local towns and neighborhoods, including Homestead, Clairton, and Elizabeth. The delivery statements only encompass a six-month period in 1904. Information on voucher records includes voucher number, date, purpose, amount, and for what office or department received the voucher. The voucher records correspond with the actual accounts payable vouchers that can be found in this subseries. Beginning with Voucher #119, vouchers contain weekly payroll information, which includes a list of employees, hours worked during the week, and pay rate. The vouchers also include bills from various companies doing business with Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company. Although vouchers are arranged numerically, the numbers begin over again. The voucher renumbering had to do with the sale of the company to D.W. Dunlevy in 1904.

  BoxFolder
Balance Sheets, July 13-December 31, 1901 341
  Folder
Balance Sheets, January 31-November 30, 1902 2
  Folder
Balance Sheets, February 28-December 31, 1903 3
  Folder
Balance Sheets, February 22-October 25, 1904 4
  Folder
Weekly Reports, January-April 1902 5
  Folder
Weekly Reports, May-August 1902 6
  Folder
Weekly Reports, September-October 1902 7
  Folder
Weekly Reports, November-December 1902 8
  Folder
Weekly Reports, January 1903 9
  Folder
Weekly Reports, February 1903 10
  Folder
Weekly Reports, March 1903 11
  Folder
Weekly Reports, April 1903 12
  Folder
Weekly Reports, May 1903 13
  Folder
Weekly Reports, June 1903 14
  Folder
Weekly Reports, July 1903 15
  Folder
Weekly Reports, August 1903 16
  Folder
Weekly Reports, September 1903 17
  Folder
Weekly Reports, October-November 1903 18
  Folder
Weekly Reports, December 1903-January 1904 19
  Folder
Weekly Reports, February-March 1904 20
  Folder
Weekly Reports, April-May 1904 21
  Folder
Weekly Reports, June-July 1904 22
  Folder
Weekly Reports, August-October 1904 23
  BoxFolder
Voucher Records, July-September 1901 351
  Folder
Voucher Records, October 1901 2
  Folder
Voucher Records, November-December 1901 3
  Folder
Voucher Records, January 1902 4
  Folder
Voucher Records, February 1902 5
  Folder
Voucher Records, March-April 1902 6
  Folder
Voucher Records, May 1902 7
  Folder
Voucher Records, June 1902 8
  Folder
Voucher Records, July 1902 9
  Folder
Voucher Records, September 1902 10
  Folder
Voucher Records, October 1902 11
  Folder
Voucher Records, November 1902 12
  Folder
Voucher Records, December 1902-February 1903 13
  Folder
Voucher Records, March 1903 14
  Folder
Voucher Records, April-May 1903 15
  Folder
Voucher Records, June 1903 16
  Folder
Voucher Records, July-September 1903 17
  Folder
Voucher Records, October-December 1903 18
  Folder
Voucher Records, January-February 1904 19
  Folder
Vouchers, July 30-August 13, 1901 20
  Folder
Vouchers, August 15- September 3, 1901 21
  Folder
Vouchers, September 3-September 12, 1901 22
  Folder
Vouchers, September 14, 1901 23
  BoxFolder
Vouchers, September 14-September 21, 1901 361
  Folder
Vouchers, September 21-December 27, 1901 2
  Folder
Vouchers, October 3-11, 1901 3
  Folder
Vouchers, October 11-December 31, 1901 4
  Folder
Vouchers, December 31, 1901-January 8, 1902 5
  Folder
Vouchers, January 8, 1902 6
  Folder
Vouchers, January 9, 1902 7
  Folder
Vouchers, January 9-10, 1902 8
  Folder
Vouchers, January 10-22, 1902 9
  Folder
Vouchers, January 22-February 12, 1902 10
  Folder
Vouchers, February 13, 1902 11
  Folder
Vouchers, February 19-March 8, 1902 12
  BoxFolder
Vouchers, March 10-April 3, 1902 371
  Folder
Vouchers, April 7-June 21, 1902 2
  Folder
Vouchers, May 3-June 21, 1902 3
  Folder
Vouchers, May 21-June 14, 1902 4
  Folder
Vouchers, June 14-21, 1902 5
  Folder
Vouchers, June 21-July 21, 1902 6
  Folder
Vouchers, July 26, 1902 7
  Folder
Vouchers, July 26-August 12, 1902 8
  Folder
Vouchers, August 19-25, 1902 9
  Folder
Vouchers, August 25-September 3, 1902 10
  BoxFolder
Vouchers, September 5-20, 1902 381
  Folder
Vouchers, September 20-October 3, 1902 2
  Folder
Vouchers, October 17-29, 1902 3
  Folder
Vouchers, October 29-30, 1902 4
  Folder
Vouchers, November 4-19, 1902 5
  Folder
Vouchers, November 21-December 19, 1902 6
  Folder
Vouchers, November 25-December 19, 1902 7
  Folder
Vouchers, January 3-8, 1903 8
  Folder
Vouchers, January 8-20, 1903 9
  Folder
Vouchers, January 31-February 2, 1903 10
  Folder
Vouchers, February 2-24, 1903 11
  Folder
Vouchers, February 28-March 18, 1903 12
  BoxFolder
Vouchers, March 18, 1903 391
  Folder
Vouchers, March 18-26, 1903 2
  Folder
Vouchers, April 3-18, 1903 3
  Folder
Vouchers, April 18-May 20, 1903 4
  Folder
Vouchers, May 22-June 9, 1903 5
  Folder
Vouchers, June 9-18, 1903 6
  Folder
Vouchers, June 18-20, 1903 7
  Folder
Vouchers, June 20-July 8, 1903 8
  Folder
Vouchers, July 8-20, 1903 9
  Folder
Vouchers, July 20-August 19, 1903 10
  Folder
Vouchers, August 20-September 12, 1903 11
  Folder
Vouchers, September 18-October 15, 1903 12
  Folder
Vouchers, October 21-November 12, 1903 13
  Folder
Vouchers, November 18-27, 1903 14
  BoxFolder
Vouchers, November 27-December 21, 1903 401
  Folder
Vouchers, December 22, 1903-February 2, 1904 2
  Folder
Vouchers, February 8-March 25, 1904 3
  Folder
Vouchers, March 28-May 25, 1904 4
  Folder
Vouchers, May 27-July 1904 5
  Folder
Vouchers, August 6-September 2, 1904 6
  Folder
Vouchers, September 2-October 6, 1904 7
  Folder
Vouchers, October 6-30, 1904 8
  Folder
Vouchers, 1901-1904 9
  Folder
Bills, 1901 10
  Folder
Bills, 1902 11
  Folder
Bills, 1903 12
  Folder
Bills, 1904 13
  Folder
Delivery Statements, July 14-30, 1904 14
  Folder
Delivery Statements, August 1-15, 1904 15
  Folder
Delivery Statements, August 16-31, 1904 16
  Folder
Delivery Statements, September 1-14, 1904 17
  Folder
Delivery Statements, September 19-October 5, 1904 18
  Folder
Construction, Liability, Accounts Due Totals, 1902-1904 19
  Folder
Brick Manufacturing Totals, January-July 1902 20
  Folder
Bricks Sold and Made Totals (intermittent), 1902-1903 21
  Folder
Machinery Orders, 1902-1903 22
  Folder
Summary of Expenses, September 1, 1902-August 31, 1903 23
  Folder
Payroll, November 1903-October 1904 24
  Folder
Pay Tickets, December 1903 25
  Folder
Time Sheets, 1903-1904 26
  BoxFolder
Checks, 1903 411
  Folder
Cancelled Checks, 1901 2
  Folder
Cancelled Checks, 1902 3-5
  Folder
Cancelled Checks, 1902-1903 6
  Folder
Cancelled Checks, 1903-1904 7
  BoxFolder
Cancelled Checks, 1903-1904 421
  Folder
Accounts Payable, Vouchers (Blank), undated 2
  Folder
Account Cards, 1903-1904 3
  Folder
Misc. Notes, undated 4
  Folder
Journal, September 30, 1901-October 25, 1904 5

Subseries  3. Administrative Records, 1902-1904 

Scope and Content Notes

Material in this subseries consists of meetings minutes, taxes statements, contracts and agreements between the Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company and other local companies. Reports of Loans and Capital Stock include gross earning totals for each year. The materials in this subseries date from 1902 to 1904.

  Folder
Meetings, (intermittent), 1902-1904 6
  Folder
Report of Loans and Capital Stock, 1902 7
  Folder
Report of Loans and Capital Stock, 1903 8
  Folder
Report of Loans and Capital Stock, 1904 9
  Folder
Contracts, 1901-1902 10
  Folder
Agreements, 1903-1904 11
  Folder
Increase of Capital Stock, June 16, 1902 12
  Folder
Business License, August 1, 1904 13
  Folder
Insurance Certificates, 1903-1904 14
  Folder
Stationary, undated 15

Subseries  4. Bound Volumes, 1901-1904, undated 

Scope and Content Notes

The bound volumes document to the financial activities of the Clairton Brick & Manufacturing Company and include a ledger, journal, letterpress copybook, meeting minutes, and bank books. The delivery book provides information on where bricks were sent, order amount, and price. The volumes date from 1901 to 1904.

  BoxVolume
Delivery Book, December 31, 1901-September 30, 1904 431
  Volume
Meeting Minutes, August 8, 1901-July 12, 1904 2
  BoxVolume
Ledger, 1901-1903 441
  Volume
Ledger, 1901-1904 2
  BoxFolder
Account Book, July 17, 1901- February 8, 1904 451
  Folder
Account Book, July 18, 1902- August 13, 1904 2
  Folder
Checkbooks, August 5, 1901- October 2, 1901 3
  Folder
Checkbooks, July 18, 1902- June 8, 1903 4
  Folder
Checkbooks, July 29, 1901- January 9, 1901 5
  Folder
Checkbooks, July 9, 1902- July 13, 1904 6
  Folder
Checkbooks, June 9, 1903- July 6, 1904 7
  Folder
Cashbook, 1901-1904 8
  Folder
Stock Certificates, August 27, 1901-October 29, 1902 9

Return to Table of Contents »


Series  VIII. Clairton Street Railway Company, 1905-1916 

Historical Background

Henry Clay Frick founded the Clairton Street Railway Company in May 1904. The Clairton Street Railway line ran on present-day St. Clair Street to the Clairton Works, located approximately 20 miles south of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on the west bank of the Monongahela River. The works were built in 1901 by St. Clair Steel Company, a division of Crucible Steel Company, as a steel manufacturing plant. The company was then purchased by United States Steel in 1904. The street car company was formed in response to the United States Steel buyout and plans for an expansion of the Clairton Works. The railway company provided transportation to and from the plant and surrounding community.

The headquarters for the company was located in the Frick Building in downtown Pittsburgh, although the railway operated “from the Clairton Street Railway Station of the Pennsylvania Railroad to the town at the top of the hill.” Records indicate that Frick was the major stockholder, owning over ninety percent of the company. However, other investors joined the company in 1905, including many of Frick’s close business associates, William H. Smith, D.B. Kinch, William A. Carr, F.W. McElroy, and Frick’s nephew, Karl F. Overholt.

In November 1909, the street car company was experiencing financial hardships and sold a portion of the railway’s road to W.B. Grubbs, a representative of the Steubenville & East Liverpool Railway Company, for $35,000, which was below market value. With the company in danger of going bankrupt, Frick reached agreements in 1912 to divide and sell the company and assets between the West Penn Railways and the Pittsburgh Railways Companies.

Scope and Content Notes

This series consists of three subseries that include Correspondence, Financial Material, and Administrative Records. The material includes correspondence, a letterpress copybook, receipts, statements, reports, maps and pamphlets relating to the running of the Clairton Street Railway Company. There are also materials about Pennsylvania Railway Associations and oversized maps which are located in the Maps and Architectural Drawings Series. The material in this series documents the general business activities of the Clairton Street Railway Company and dates from 1905 to 1916.

Subseries  1. Correspondence, 1906-1912 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries consists of incoming correspondence relating to business activities of the Clairton Street Railway Company, including purchase of equipment from St. Louis Car Company and Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company. Additional letters from the Pennsylvania State Railroad Commission provided policies and recommendations for the railway company. This subseries also contains folders with duplicates of outgoing letters found in the letterpress copybook. The letterpress copybook contains the outgoing correspondence, memorandum, accident reports and general account statements for the years 1906 to 1912. Many of the letters match-up with incoming correspondence found in this subseries. Additional outgoing letters regarding the Clairton Street Railway Company can be found in the letterpress copybook of the St. Clair Improvement Company dated September 1, 1905-December 5, 1906. Many of the letters in this copybook are fading and are difficult to read. The correspondence in this subseries date from 1906 to 1913.

  BoxFolder
Correspondence, December 23, 1905-November 19, 1906 461
  Folder
Correspondence, January 5-April 26, 1907 2
  Folder
Correspondence, May 7-30, 1907 3
  Folder
Correspondence, June 13-October 17, 1907 4
  Folder
Correspondence, January 4-February 27, 1908 5
  Folder
Correspondence, March 2-July 24, 1908 6
  Folder
Correspondence, August 19-December 9, 1908 7
  Folder
Correspondence, January 15, 1909-February 10, 1910 8
  Folder
Correspondence, March 24-July 29, 1910 9
  Folder
Correspondence, August 2, 1910-June 26, 1911 10
  Folder
Correspondence, July 6-August 5, 1911 11
  Folder
Correspondence, August 8-31, 1911 12
  Folder
Correspondence, September 2-October 18, 1911 13
  Folder
Correspondence, November 2-29, 1911 14
  Folder
Correspondence, December 1-29, 1911 15
  Folder
Correspondence, January 8-9, 1913, undated 16
  Box
Letterpress Copybook, October 10,1906- October 21, 1912 47

Subseries  2. Financial Material, 1905-1912 

Scope and Content Notes

The Financial Materials Subseries is comprised of receipts, general account statements, company balance information, and monthly profit and loss reports. The profit and loss statements for April/May 1911 and 1912 are hand written and document the financial hardships that the company experienced. Additional financial materials include equipment receipts, ledger balances, and yearly earnings from 1910 to 1912. The materials in this subseries date from May 1905 to August 1912.

  BoxFolder
Receipts, Consolidated Car-Heating Company, 1911 481
  Folder
Receipts, St. Louis Car Company, 1906-1908 2
  Folder
Receipts, Westinghouse Air Brake Company, 1911 3
  Folder
Receipts, Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company, 1911 4
  Folder
Receipts, Westinghouse Traction Brake Company, 1911 5
  Folder
General Account Statements, May-November 1905 6
  Folder
General Account Statements, February-June 1906 7
  Folder
General Account Statements, July, September-December 1906 8
  Folder
General Account Statements, January-June 1907 9
  Folder
General Account Statements, July-December 1907 10
  Folder
General Account Statements, January-June 1908 11
  Folder
General Account Statements, July-December 1908 12
  Folder
General Account Statements, January-June 1909 13
  Folder
General Account Statements, July-November 1909 14
  Folder
General Account Statements, January-June 1910 15
  Folder
General Account Statements, July-December 1910 16
  Folder
General Account Statements, January-June 1911 17
  Folder
General Account Statements, July-December 1911 18
  Folder
General Account Statements, January-August 1912 19
  Folder
Ledger Balances, September-October 1912 20
  Folder
Yearly Earnings, 1910-1912 21
  Folder
Profit and Loss Statement, April-May 1911,1912 22
  Folder
List of Stockholders, 1905 23

Subseries  3. Administrative Records, 1905-1916 

Scope and Content Notes

The records in this subseries reflect the administrative functions of the Clairton Street Railway Company. The materials include municipal records, circulars, bills, inventories, schedules, correspondence, contracts, resolutions, agreements and newspaper clippings. The municipal records contain proceedings of the Council of the City of Pittsburgh, including presentations, reports of committees, and information on ordinances passed concerning railway systems in Pittsburgh. A memorandum from Karl F. Overholt of the Carnegie Steel Company to E.M. Biles, President of the Council of Clairton, documents the agreement to provide power to the company’s railway cars. In the note, Overholt summarizes statements made by Biles, including his feelings about one of the company’s motormen, car schedules, and sanitation on the cars. This agreement goes along with other materials relating to a resolution passed by the Council of Clairton in 1912. The Schedules were produced by Pittsburgh Railways Company and include “Points of Interest,” “Views of the City,” and “Interesting Sightseeing Trips” that can be reached by the railway in 1916. Brief descriptions are provided which include some attractions that no longer exist and others that continue to thrive today, including Allegheny Observatory, Phipps Conservatory, and the Pittsburgh view from Mt. Washington. The material in this subseries dates from 1905 to 1916.

  BoxFolder
Municipal Records, December 14, 1915-January 24, 1916 491
  Folder
City of Pittsburgh, Bills No. 4457-4477, 4494, December 17-21, 1915 2
  Folder
Chamber of Commerce of Pittsburgh, Reports, January 18-26, 1916 3
  Folder
Interstate Commerce Commission Circular,  January 10-March 14, 1908 4
  Folder
Pennsylvania State Railroad Commission Circular,  1908 5
  Folder
Brill’s Magazine, October 15, 1908 6
  Folder
Carnegie Steel Company Power Agreement, November 1, 1911- November 5, 1912 7
  Folder
Council of Clairton Resolution, July 8-12, 1912 8
  Folder
Car Inspection Reports, undated 9
  Folder
Inventory, June 28, 1912 10
  Folder
Daily Passenger Average, April-October, 1905 11
  Folder
Motormen Instructions, July 10-20, 1912 12
  Folder
Contract for Sale of Road, November 13, 1909 13
  Folder
Newspaper Clippings, July 6, 1912-February 24, 1916 14
  Folder
Pittsburgh Railways Company, Schedules, 1916 15
  Folder
Railway Notes, 1911-1919 16

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Series  IX. Correspondence, 1883-1919 

Scope and Content Notes

Henry Clay Frick, due to his many business ventures, corresponded frequently with his partners and associates. The majority of these letters are between Frick and his business partner, Andrew Carnegie, as well as company business managers, Charles M. Schwab and James Gayley. The remaining correspondence involves various Carnegie employees and acquaintances of Frick regarding business matters, industry, and travel.

As noted, some of the material is housed at the Archives of The Frick Collection in New York City as part of the Henry Clay Frick Papers.

Subseries  1. Andrew Carnegie, 1883-1912 

Historical Background

Intense, stern, and driven are characteristics that describe Henry Clay Frick; a man that vigorously pursued all of the goals set for him. While in his industrial pursuits, a stormy partnership with Andrew Carnegie would develop and bring Frick both wealth and power at the cost of permanently scarring his reputation and the loss of control rights to his own company. This tense and tumultuous relationship between industrialists and business partners would forever transform the fabric of American industrial society.

During the 1870s, Frick built an industrial empire by manufacturing coke, an essential coal-based fuel for blast furnaces in the production of steel. In 1881, Frick was well known for his superior coke which was in high demand. Carnegie, seeing an opportunity, partnered with Frick, devised a plan to get the large quantity of coke needed for his burgeoning steel business; while Frick received a large contract and finances needed to expand. However, the partnership caused Frick to begin to lose control of his company. Carnegie, as he did with many smaller businesses he had interest in, quickly bought up all available company stock. This made Carnegie the majority shareholder and had the ability to exact a measure of influence over that company.

Although Frick may have lost his majority share in his coke company, he was not going to lose control over his workers. In an era when labor forcefully asserted its interests, Frick earned a reputation as a rigid businessman, who never compromised with his workers or their wages. Frick was notorious for his ruthless style of forcefully breaking strikes at any cost. As Frick was amassing this hard-nosed anti-labor reputation, Carnegie was carefully cultivating his image as a pro-labor industrialist, which invited conflict and tension between the partners. In 1889 Carnegie acknowledged Frick’s management potential and made him chairman of Carnegie Steel Company. Although Carnegie recognized Frick as a talented executive, at times he would also use him as a scapegoat for their unfavorable but shared labor decisions.

Carnegie happily let Frick take the fall for the events between the strikers and Pinkerton Private Guards at the Homestead Steel Mill in 1892. Frick was determined to rid the company of its most troublesome union, the Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers. A bloody battle broke-out which would brand Frick as a cold-hearted, ruthless mercenary and “America’s most hated man.” Although Carnegie had supported and directed Frick's actions during the Homestead mill lockout, he tried to pass the blame squarely on Frick. This is when their strained relationship turned bitter.

Carnegie privately sniped at his partner, which infuriated Frick and began their infamous infighting. On December 5, 1899, Frick resigned from the board of Carnegie Steel Company. However, Carnegie wanted Frick to stay and threatened to force Frick to sell his stock at far below market value. After a brief court battle, the men settled. Frick walked away with a large, but undisclosed sum of money leaving the Carnegie Steel Company behind him.

Though the two men never met again, Frick seemed to enjoy taunting Carnegie at every turn. Frick spoke publicly about Carnegie’s mismanagement of the company, detailing poor business ventures. However the taunting was not only verbal but set in stone, as Carnegie built Pittsburgh’s first skyscraper, Frick built a bigger one. The Frick Building dwarfed the Carnegie Steel Building casting it in shadows. Carnegie lived in an impressive estate in New York City; Frick, who lived only twenty blocks away, vowed that his estate would make his former partner’s look like a shack.

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries contains letters between Henry Clay Frick and Andrew Carnegie, the format of which mainly consists of original letters, carbon copies, typed and written telegrams, handwritten notes, typescript copies, and letter excerpts. The majority of the materials are incoming letters from Carnegie, but there are some letters from Frick. Letters in this subseries are arranged in chronological order and date from March 8, 1888 to July 17, 1912. Created by undergraduate students majoring in History who performed internships at the Archives Service Center, abstracts exist for each letter, which are included in the finding aid.

Many of the incoming letters are stamped “answered” by the President Office of the H.C. Frick Coke Company, the Chairman’s Office of the Carnegie Brothers & Company, and by the Chairman’s Office of the Carnegie Steel Company, Limited. The researcher should note that many of Frick’s answers to the letters are not found in the collection housed at the University of Pittsburgh’s Archives Service Center. Responses to these letters may be found in the general letterpress copybooks housed at the Archives of The Frick Collection within the Henry Clay Frick Papers in New York City. To enable joint access, both sets of correspondence have been digitized and are presented within this finding aid.

Many of the letters written by Carnegie are addressed “Chairman” and “Partner” to represent Frick as the intended recipient. Other names included are “Boys” and “Gentlemen” for letters directed to committees or directors. There are some letters addressed to “Pard.” Other letters are addressed to and from “Dod.” “Dod” was a nickname for George Lauder, a cousin of Carnegie that had influence in the company. These letters remain in this subseries due to their content and subject matter.

Much of the content in these letters is rarely personal and mainly deals with business details and administrative updates. The folder labeled as “miscellaneous” consists of letters and other documents signed by Carnegie that cannot be directly linked to a specific subject.

This subseries includes two outgoing letterpress copybooks from Frick to Carnegie, dating between September 17, 1894 to February 15, 1895, and May 1899 to June 1899, respectively. Abstracts for the first volume are included in the finding aid. The second volume mostly pertains to matters regarding a buyout option that Frick, Henry Phipps, and William H. Moore created for Carnegie; there are no abstracts provided.

In addition to four folders of Incoming Correspondence from Carnegie to Frick, 19 volumes of letterpress copybooks exist as part of the Henry Clay Frick Papers as mentioned above. In order to be comprehensive, this material is included in this finding aid and was digitized to aid access. (The Archives Service Center maintains photocopies of the correspondence.)

Related Material

Additional letterpress copybooks that contain outgoing correspondence from Henry Clay Frick to Andrew Carnegie can also be found in Series II. Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited, 1867-1894 and Series IV. Carnegie Steel Company, 1892-1900. Abstracts and digitized contents are available.

  BoxFolder
Correspondence, March 8, 1883-September 30, 1886 4801
 1. Power of attorney is given to Carnegie to subscribe for two hundred and fifty thousand dollars of the First Mortgage Bonds of the Southern Pennsylvania Railroad in the name of Edmund M. Ferguson. March 8, 1883 Typescript Copy
 2. Frick discusses securing new coke properties to strengthen their position and increase stock. August 13, 1883 Typescript Copy
 3. Frick discusses purchases of Frick Coke Company interests and stock. November 19, 1883 Typescript Copy
 4. Writing to Carnegie in New York, Frick discusses the price and purchase of natural gas. December 16, 1884 Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie discusses hopeful cooperation between his various interests and Frick's coke interests in freight trafficking. April 13, 1885 Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie discusses business interests. April 13, 1885 Autographed Letter Signed
 7. Thomas Carnegie writes to John Wilson at Pennsylvania Railroad on a matter pertaining to Henry Clay Frick. [Handwritten on verso of letter Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick], April 13, 1885. May 4, 1885 
 8. Frick refers to visit to New York and says he has enclosed two letters concerning the trip. Enclosed letters are not present. September 30, 1885 Typescript Copy
 9. Frick writes to Carnegie, to bring to his attention, a Pittsburgh architect named W.S. Fraser Corner. July 26, 1886 Typescript Copy
 10. Frick informs Carnegie of increased demand for coke and reports the number of shipments that week. September 30, 1886 Typescript Copy
  Folder
Correspondence, May 13, 1887-December 22, 1888 2
 1. Writing to inform of his decision to resign as president of the Henry Clay Frick Coke Company. May 13, 1887 Typescript Copy
 2. Frick writes informing of his intent to resign as president of the company. June 7, 1887 Typescript Copy
 3. Frick writes and informs of his resignation as president. Also, he protests the course of action to be taken against a pending worker strike. June 7, 1887 Typescript Copy
 4. Writing concerning his interests in the Henry Clay Frick Coke, after his resignation as president, Frick proposes financial propositions to the board members of Carnegie Brothers and Company, Limited. June 7, 1887 Typescript Copy
 5. Frick discusses his resignation as president and on-going labor negotiations. June 7, 1887 Typescript Copy
 6. Frick writes and informs his insurance company that he is planning a trip to Europe. June 28, 1887 Typescript Copy
 7. Writing from Kilgraston, Bridge of Earn, Scotland, Carnegie welcomes the arrival of the Frick family to the British Isles, and invites them to stay with him during their travels. August 2, 1887 Autographed Letter Signed
 8. Writing to Frick in London from Kilgraston, Bridge of Earn, Scotland, Carnegie again invites Frick and his family to visit and stay with him and his [wife Louise at Migration House] in Scotland. September 9, 1887 Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Frick discusses a financial matter. April 20, 1888 Typescript Copy
 10. Frick informs Carnegie of the number of shipments of coke during the month of April. April 30, 1888 Typescript Copy
 11. Carnegie voices his concern over the rates Pennsylvania Railroad are charging for shipment of coke and ore. May 1, 1888 Autographed Letter Signed
 12. Writing from Cluny Castle, [Scotland], Carnegie discusses a pending sale with Pennsylvania Railroad. Letter is attached to Andrew Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick, May 1, 1888. August, 1888 Autographed Letter Signed
 13. Frick discusses a sale to Pennsylvania Railroad and the building of ovens. July 26, 1888 Typescript Copy
 14. Frick writes to Carnegie of business trip to Philadelphia, Pa. and discusses matters involving Penn Company and Pennsylvania Railroad. Note attached to original from Henry Clay Frick to Andrew Carnegie about agreement with Mr. Chipley. August 2, 1888 Typescript Copy
 15. Frick cables Carnegie in Kingussie, [Scotland], concerning a business meeting. August 7, 1888 Typescript Copy, "Cablegram"
 16. Frick cables Carnegie in Kingussie, [Scotland], informing him "Roberts still sick. Has cancelled all his engagements for this week." August 13, 1888 
 17. Frick discusses business dealings in Philadelphia. November 10, 1888 Typescript Copy
 18. Writing to Carnegie in New York, Frick informs him that he repeated his telegram in Philadelphia. November 14, 1888 Typescript Copy
 19. Writing from Philadelphia, Carnegie discusses the Edgar Thomson works, labor matters, and requests Frick give his attention to undisclosed business deal. November, 1888 Autographed Letter Signed
 20. Writing to Carnegie in New York, Frick informs him that he has not received a reply from a message sent on the 7th. December 10, 1888 Typescript Copy, [Telegram]
 21. Writing from New York, Carnegie informs Frick of his concern about their Southwestern business. Also, Carnegie voices a protest about the rates Pennsylvania Railroad are charging to transport ore from the [Great] Lakes. December 13, 1888 Typed Letter Signed
 22. Writing from New York, Carnegie states than an agreement is ready to be signed by their "friends" over South Pennsylvania [Railroad], including the Vanderbilts. December 22, 1888 Typed Letter Signed
  Folder
Correspondence, January 14-February 20, 1889 3
 1. Writing to Carnegie in New York, Frick informs him that Jones, Watson, Chalfaut and Hostetter have signed the South Pennsylvania [Railroad] reorganization agreement. January 14, 1889 Typescript Copy, [Telegram]
 2. Writing to Carnegie in New York, Frick informs of further details pertaining to the South Pennsylvania [Railroad] agreement. January 14, 1889 Typescript Copy, [Telegram]
 3. Frick informs Carnegie that that he has explained the situation to Mr. Chalfaut. January 31, 1889 Typescript Copy, [Telegram]
 4. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses a labor strike and advises Frick on how to approach the wage dispute. He also discusses legal troubles between South Pennsylvania [Railroad] and Pennsylvania Railroad. February 2, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Frick makes reference to a financial matter involving [Henry] Phipps. February 2, 1889 Typescript Copy, [Telegram]
 6. Writing to Carnegie in New York, Frick refers to a letter that is to be sent to George Roberts,[president of the Pennsylvania Railroad,] stating the position their position. Frick also mentions a future visit to Pittsburgh, Pa. by Andrew Carnegie. February 4, 1889 Typescript Copy
 7. Carnegie instructs Frick over price negotiations with Mr. Roberts, [president of the Pennsylvania Railroad,] and also discusses issues involving other railroad companies. February, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 8. Carnegie discusses future interests with Pennsylvania Railroad and legal matters pertaining to South Pennsylvania [Railroad] and Pennsylvania Railroad. February 16, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie sends a cable from Christiania, [Norway], stating to get more options. February 18, 1889 Cablegram Typescript Copy
 10. Writing to Carnegie in New York, Frick informs him that he has received his letter regarding the "Basic Matter" and discusses relations between Pennsylvania Railroad and a future trip to Philadelphia. February 18, 1889 Typescript Copy
 11. Telegram from Moore in Pittsburgh, Pa. to Frick in Philadelphia, Pa. requesting authorization to close a deal. February 20, 1889 Telegram Typescript Copy
 12. Frick approves deal. [Transcript attached above]. February 20, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
  Folder
Correspondence, February 21-March 22, 1889 4
 1. Carnegie requests Frick to see [Frank] Thomson about South Pennsylvania [Railroad Company]. February 21, 1889 Typescript Copy Telegram
 2. Frick writes from Philadelphia, Pa. to Carnegie in New York City, he discusses his meeting with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company people and also comments on issues on ore and South Pennsylvania [Railroad Company]. February 22, 1889 Typescript Copy
 3. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York, he informs on issues concerning Pennsylvania Railroad Company, Pig metal, and ore purchases. February 23, 1889 Typescript Copy
 4. Writing to Carnegie in New York, Frick informs Carnegie of Mr. Chipley's meetings in the south with Pennsylvania Railroad Company. The agreement and revenue bill, which Frick indicates enclosing with the letter are not present. February 23, 1889 Typescript Copy
 5. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses railroad lines and shipment of coal to their mills, a possible land purchase and rail orders. February 26, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses rail orders and the purchase of ore. Letter attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick, February 26, 1889. March 7, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York, in response to his letter of the previous day and discusses railroads, pig iron and property. February 27, 1889 Typescript Copy
 8. Frick informs Carnegie of rail orders refers to undisclosed matter involving a Mr. Parke and the Council of Allegheny City. March 7,1889 Typescript Copy
 9. Frick requests Carnegie to "please note and return" and informs him that this is answer to the letter shown him Philadelphia, Pa. The letter contains a note ("Time is on our side -- Dull days ahead depend upon it.") and a signature from Carnegie. March 11, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 10. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses issues concerning Carnegie Brothers and Company, Limited and Henry Clay Frick Coke Company and mentions a matter involving a Mr. Moore at Carnegie Brothers. March 13, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 11. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York, he discusses business concerning mills in Chicago and problem involving Mr. Moore at Carnegie Brothers and Company. March 13, 1889 Typescript Copy
 12. Carnegie voices his displeasure over Mr. Moore's drinking problem and advises on how to handle the situation. He also refers to business in Chicago and major upcoming meeting involving Henry Phipps on April 1 and the sale of rails. March 14, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 13. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses matters in Chicago and requests Frick's attendance to meeting occurring that week. He also mentions a speech, which he gave at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, Pa. March 20, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 14. Frick writes, "Still Dickering. Am Afraid can nothing off." March 22, 1889 Typescript Copy
 15. Frick makes a reference to closing a deal. March 28, 1889 Typescript Copy
  Folder
Correspondence, March 28-April 15, 1889 5
 1. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses negotiations about the price of ore and the cost of shipping. April 12, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 2. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses and advises Frick on the price of rails. April 13, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 3. Writing from New York, Carnegie requests to know if Frick is traveling east that evening. April 13, 1889 Typescript Copy Telegram
 4. Writing from New York, Carnegie informs Frick that he has mailed him an important letter. [Telegram attached to Andrew Carnegie to Carnegie Brothers and Company], April 13, 1889. April 13, 1889 Telegram
 5. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses business and mentions possible legal action toward Pennsylvania Railroad. [April, 1889] Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 6. Carnegie writes from New York to Frick in Philadelphia, Pa. and discusses stock. April 15, 1889 Telegram Typescript Copy
  Folder
Correspondence, April 20-May 1, 1889 6
 1. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses the purchase and price of ore. April 20, 1889 Telegram Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes from New York and instructs Frick to postpone meeting in Philadelphia, Pa. April 20, 1889 Telegram Typescript Copy
 3. Writing from New York, Carnegie inquires if the rail line from their property to New York to Cleveland has been located and if so requests work be done to it. April 20, 1889 Telegram Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie writes from New York and informs Frick of meeting to be held in Philadelphia, Pa. on May 3, 1889. April 25, 1889 Telegram Typescript Copy
 5. Writing from New York, Carnegie instructs Frick about the negotiations over the order and price of [ore]. April 26, 1889 Typescript Copy Telegram
 6. Carnegie writes from New York and discusses business deals, profits and wages. April 26, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie discusses financial matters, the purchase of stock and the breaking of a strike at Allegheny [Steel Company]. April 28, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 8. Writing from New York, Carnegie refers to options. May 1, 1889 Telegram Typescript Copy
  Folder
Correspondence, May 2-June 15, 1889 7
 1. Carnegie discusses traveling to Pittsburgh, Pa. [from New York City] with Frick on Saturday or Sunday of that week and business options. May 2, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 2. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York and requesting the Leisenring letter. May 13, 1889 Typescript Copy, [Telegram]
 3. Writing from New York, Carnegie inquires about the issuing of bonds on coke properties. May 13, 1889 Typescript Copy Telegram
 4. Frick discusses the Leisenring letter and informs Carnegie of changes made to the letter. Frick indicates he has enclosed a copy of the revised letter, however the letter is not present. May 14, 1889 Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie discusses coke matters and the price and purchase of ore. A newspaper article was included with the article entitled, "Coke Selling Bellow the Cost of Production," dated May 13. May 14, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Writing from New York, Carnegie instructs Frick to make arrangement with the Minnesota Iron Company regarding the purchase and transportation of ore. May 15, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Writing from New York, Carnegie refers to an offer of a personal guarantee that weaken security. May 15, 1889 Typescript Copy Telegram
 8. Writing from London, England, Carnegie discusses bringing coke rates down, labor relations at Homestead and his trip to England and Paris. May 28, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 9. Writing from Paris, France, issues pertaining to the rate of ore, the rate of coke prices and the buying of stock. In the same letter he also addresses Carnegie Brothers and Company on Pewabic mine. June 12, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 10. Frick discusses ore rates; relations with railroad companies; coke production; internal business relations; negotiations with Amalgamated and the makes reference to the Johnstown flood. June 13, 1889 Typescript Copy
 11. Writing from London, England, Carnegie discusses his trip through Europe; makes reference to the flood in Johnstown; discusses rates of iron and coke and labor negotiations. June 15, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
  Folder
Correspondence, June 16-July 25, 1889 8
 1. Writing from London, England, [Carnegie] voices concern over financial losses at Lake Superior mines and comments on his travels in Europe. June 16, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 2. Writing from London, England, Carnegie discusses financial losses at Lake Superior mines. June 18, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 3. Writing from Norway, Carnegie discusses labor relations at Homestead; production of pig iron; the cost of rails and his travels in Europe. July 9, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 4. Writing from London, England, Carnegie discusses Allegheny [Steel Company] and his travels in Europe. July 16, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 5. Writing from Christiana, [Norway], Carnegie discusses Allegheny [Steel], prices and his European travels. July 18, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 6. Writing from Cluny Castle in Scotland, Carnegie discusses his business partners vacationing with him at Cluny; discusses business in Great Britain and Europe; he inquires about the health of Frick's daughter Martha and advises helping [William] McKinley in Ohio by sending him five thousand dollars. A note written on the on the back of the last page advises to send contributions directly to Mayer. July 23, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 7. [Frick] discusses a disagreement with Carnegie over a matter pertaining to Pennsylvania Railroad matter. Letter attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick, July 23, 1889. August 9, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 8. Frick writes Carnegie [in Europe], updating him about business at Carnegie Brothers Company and various other business interests. July 25, 1889 Typescript Copy
  Folder
Correspondence, July 27-August 30, 1889 9
 1. Frick informs Carnegie about property bonds and Pennsylvania Railroad contracts. July 27, 1889 Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie discusses Homestead mill, stock, and rail lines. August, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 3. Writing from Berlin, Germany, Carnegie discusses coke and rail prices and negotiations. He also talks of his stay Berlin and Russia. August 7, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 4. Writing from Berlin, Germany, Carnegie discusses production at mills and his visit to Russia. August 7, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 5. Writing from Berlin, Germany, Carnegie discusses production at mills and various other business. August 8, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. [Carnegie] sends cable from Paris indicating that his [wife Louise] Mrs. Whitfield is ill and they will set sail on Wednesday. August 16, 1889 Cablegram
 7. A telegram sent by [Carnegie] from Queenstown, [Ireland] reads, "Eland Sick Unot Death Cost Pig Prevent Running Next Year Half Capital Already Last." August 22, 1889 Typescript Copy Telegram
 8. Frick informs Carnegie of various business transactions. August 30, 1889 Typescript Copy
  Folder
Correspondence, September 2-October 10, 1889 10
 1. Carnegie discusses his displeasure over the management and losses sustained at the Beaver Falls, [Pa.] mill. September 2, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 2. Writing from "Blaines College", Bar Harbor, [Maine], Carnegie pronounces his belief in Frick as competent manager and his doubt about Mr. Abbott's abilities in the mill business. Carnegie also advises Frick on a pending business deal. September 3, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie advises Frick on the hiring of a young business man named Mr. Peacock at Carnegie Phipps and Company. September 4, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 4. Frick informs Carnegie About the production, price and the sale of rails along with on-going business negotiations. September 5, 1889 Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie advise Frick on the price of rails and various business at Carnegie Phipps and Company. September 9, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Frick informs Carnegie of Captain [William Jones] health after an accident in which he was severely injured. September 28, 1889 Typescript Copy, [Telegraph]
 7. Carnegie sends a message that reads," Good you will be proud of your man one of these days". October 10, 1889 Telegram Typescript Copy
  Folder
Correspondence, October 11-26, 1889 11
 1. Carnegie advises Frick about the operation of the Edgar Thomson and Homestead works and discusses matters pertaining to coke prices and properties. October 11, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 2. Frick reports the production or the sale of fifty-nine hundred tons of rails that week. October 12, 1889 Typescript Copy
 3. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses the production and price of steel rails and about competition from Chicago. October 14, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie advises Frick on business deals, Beaver Valley, [Pa.] works and the production and price of rails. October 19, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie advises Frick over coke prices, negotiations, orders and prices of steel rails. October 21, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 6. Carnegie advises Frick over the purchase of ore. October 21, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie advises Frick over negotiations to purchase land for expansion of their businesses. October 21, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 8. Writing to Carnegie in New York, Frick discusses Connellsville Coal, purchase of properties, employees, and Drexel and Morgan and Company. October 21, 1889 Typescript Copy
 9. Carnegie discusses business in Europe; the price of pig iron and the price of rails. Included with the letter, a newspaper clipping concerning the price of pig iron in England. October 26, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
  Folder
Correspondence, October 30-November 20, 1889 12
 1. Writing From New York, Carnegie informs Frick about the extension of the Chicago Junction and its correlation to ore rates and their competitors in Chicago. October 30, 1889 Typescript Copy Telegram
 2. Writing from New York, Carnegie informs Frick of a letter he has sent him stamped addressed to the Frick Coke Company. October 30, 1889 Telegram Typescript Copy
 3. Carnegie discusses negotiations over the possible purchase of Allegheny [Bessemer Steel] for $600,000. Included with the letter, a newspaper clipping reporting on the price of iron in England. October 30, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 4. Writing from Washington, D.C., Carnegie informs Frick about undisclosed business dealings. November 11, 1889 Typescript Copy Telegram
 5. Carnegie addresses issues concerning the price and purchase of ore, Mr. [Alexander] Peacock, Homestead works and structural steel. November 15, 1889 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Frick inform Carnegie about the proceedings in the negotiations to purchase Allegheny Steel Company and the acquisition of ore and the purchase of stock. November 15, 1889 Typescript Copy
 7. Frick informs Carnegie of discussion a with Mr. Park from [Allegheny Steel Company] and reports the how many tons of rails were produced that week. November 16, 1880 Typescript Copy
 8. Frick announces his arrival to Washington, D.C. November 20, 1889 Typescript Copy, [Telegram]
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Correspondence, November 21-December 5, 1889 13
 1. Frick informs Carnegie about negotiations about the purchase of ore and advises sending a Mr. Hurst to Chile and also a man to England. Allegheny Steel Company, stock and the closure of the Lawrence Bank in [Pittsburgh] are among other the topics Frick discusses in his letter. November 20, 1889 Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes from Washington, D.C. and advises Frick on ore negotiations and Mr. Park from [Allegheny Steel Company]. November 21, 1889 Typescript Telegram
 3. Carnegie writes from New York discussing price negotiations for the purchase of ore. November 22, 1889 Typescript Copy Telegram
 4. Carnegie makes reference to price and cost his in telegram. November 25, 1889 Telegram Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie discusses the use of nickel for [steel] plate armor for [naval] ships and makes reference to Benjamin F. Tracy[Secretary of the Navy]. November 27, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie discusses production at the [Edgar Thomson] and [Homestead] works. November 30, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 7. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses the purchase of ore and competitors in Chicago. December 3, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 8. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses the purchase of ore and competitors in Chicago. December 3, 1889 Typescript Copy
 9. Frick informs Carnegie on a matter concerning ore. December 4, 1889 Typescript Copy
 10. Carnegie discusses the possible purchase of coke property. December 5, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, December 6-11, 1889 14
 1. Frick notifies Carnegie that he has received his letter. December 6, 1889 Typescript Copy, [Telegram]
 2. Frick discusses purchase of coke property. December 6, 1889 Typescript Copy
 3. Frick informs Carnegie of production, price and sales of rails along with the price of ore and the purchase of land. December 7, 1889 Typescript Copy
 4. Frick discusses the purchase of the Davis Coal property and negotiations to buy out McClure Coke Company. December 9, 1889 Typescript Copy
 5. Frick makes reference to independence in his telegram. December 9, 1889 Telegram Typescript Copy
 6. Carnegie mentions the purchase of Garret Davis property and announces he will return to Boston to [Pittsburgh]. On his return from Boston, Carnegie requests a conference with Frick. December 9, 1889 Telegram Typescript Copy
 7. Carnegie discusses sales and production and price of rails. December 9, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie discusses the purchase of Garrett Coal and a possible buy out or merger with Rainey and Cochran and McClure. December 9, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 9. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York City, informing him of his departure to Philadelphia and reports on the "Norrie matter." December 11,1889 Typescript, [Telegram]
 10. Carnegie makes reference to Frick coming east and a meeting. December 11,1889 Telegram Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, December 14-30, 1889 4811
 1. Carnegie writes on the various possibilities for new rail supply lines for coke to his mills. Also, potential problems with Chicago based railways rate noted. He further mentions a few men he thinks highly of in his mills. December 14, 1889 Typescript Copy Autograph Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes from New York to instruct Frick to give the Gazette newspaper and the Dispatch a copy of his Boston speech. December 16, 1889 Telegram
 3. Frick writes from Pittsburgh to say that Carnegie's speech will be published in the December 17, 1889 Gazette as Carnegie requested. December 16, 1889 Typescript Copy, [Telegram]
 4. Frick writes about steel rail prices and competition. December 17, 1889 Typescript Copy
 5. Frick details progress of "Steelworks" repairs and describes staff appointments of Mr. Peacock and Mr. Clemson. December 21, 1889 Typescript Copy
 6. Carnegie writes to applaud Frick's staffing decisions of Mr. Peacock and Mr. Clemson. He speculates on the stock market rising and then mentions a trip to Washington D.C. December 23, 1889 Typescript Copy Autograph Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes on Dod's activity and advantages as well as a warning against the potential loss of trade secrets through working with an outside expert or engineer. December 26, 1889 Autograph Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 8. Frick writes on orders for steel and expresses concern over signs of rising raw material prices. He briefly details labor increases for the coming years and expresses gladness for Carnegie's plans to visit. December 26, 1889 Typescript Copy
 9. Carnegie writes of upward stock potential and plans to delay contracts in order to net more money. December 27, 1889 Autograph Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 10. Frick writes to Carnegie of how he has carried out his instructions. Frick also details recent land purchases with both good and poor results. December 28, 1889 Typescript Copy
 11. Frick writes Carnegie, who is in New York, NY that Edgar Thomson plant is in good shape. December 30, 1889 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, January-December 1889 2
 1. Carnegie writes about technological advances announced by competitors related to the Bessemer. He calls for greater awareness of the competition and a move to get territorial rights. Saturday ? 16, 1889 Typescript Copy Autograph Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes to Frick about his decision to bring legal action against "South Penna" and Thomson. Undated, 1889 Telegram Typescript Copy
 3. Carnegie writes from Munchen [Germany] to tell Frick of problems with the Eland Negotiations. Undated Typescript Copy Telegram
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Correspondence, January 2-11, 1890 3
 1. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to tell Frick that his figures for 1889 "will do," but 1890 should double. He then describes a slight illness and briefly elaborates his trip itinerary for Friday. January 2, 1890 Telegram
 2. Frick writes from Pittsburgh, [Pa.] to express his condolences for Carnegie's ailment and then relates the success of the converter in producing coke. January 2, 1890 Typescript Copy
 3. Frick writes to Carnegie about a settlement of $75,000 USD. He also describes the Edgar Thomson plant as being in great condition, listing steel production per coke use. January 2, 1890 Typescript Copy
 4. Frick writes to Carnegie on the possibility of opening up more furnaces at either Homestead or Edgar Thomson. He also gives his opinion on the way to go about purchasing Poor Farm. January 6, 1890 Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie writes on plans to produce more efficiently by cleaning out furnaces, even if it requires building an extra furnace to keep up production. Received January 6, 1890 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Frick writes on the labor issues as profits are down and labor desires increases including Carnegie's "wise" comments on the subject. January 7, 1890 Typescript Copy
 7. Carnegie writes on a report he has received, the shaky market, and Frick's desire to come and visit him. January 8, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed
 8. Carnegie writes that British prices are up, which could lead to advances in Western Pennsylvania. January 9, 1890 Typescript Copy
 9. Frick writes on production and that Eland shut down because of a shortage of gas. January 9, 1890 Typescript Copy
 10. Carnegie writes on the purchasing terms for Poor Farm in relation to Vanderbilt. January 9, 1890 Typescript Copy Telegram
 11. Carnegie writes to instruct Frick to dump coke under the trestles carrying molten metal to converters. January 13, 1890 Telegram
 12. Frick writes to describe production and to explain a situation in which gas was knowingly sold to a rival plant. January 9, 1890 Typescript Copy
 13. Dumont Clarke of the American Exchange National Bank in New York informs Carnegie that Frick had made a deposit for Carnegie's company and that the bank believes both parties will benefit from their business together. January 11, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, January 13-28, 1890 4
 1. Frick writes on rail shipping, the plan to wait on Poor Farm, talks with Illinois Steel Company regarding rail cars in the coke trade and a report on blast furnaces. He advices Carnegie on keeping his interests in the Connellsville coke region. January 13, 1890 Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes that he will be at the Hotel Normandie in Washington through Friday afternoon. January 14, 1890 Telegram
 3. Carnegie writes from Washington D.C. on dumping coke onto the converter track between heats. He also expresses his opinion that stocking up on coke will bring fair prices. January 15, 1890 Telegram
 4. Carnegie writes on competition with Allegheny and efforts to beat them. He also instructs Frick on dealing with the Pennsylvania Rail Road. Answered January 15, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie writes on the Stock markets' typical January flux and that he is not concerned with it. He also gives advice on Eland and opposition against Eland's order. January 20, 1890 Telegram
 6. Carnegie writes on working to get Camden's business. He also warns about "the grippe" and staying healthy. January 16, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 7. William G. LeDuc, US Commissioner of Agriculture under President Hayes, writes Carnegie to inform him of experiments to obtain aluminum at low cost and asks if he would like to be involved in the experimentation, citing about fifty successful and efficient attempts of the process. January 21, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed
 8. Carnegie writes on his coming to Pittsburgh for a week. He writes on the potential to make money with the Navy Department and the possible maintenance needs of Edgar Thomson and Homestead. Received January 22, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes on his dealings with the Navy Department. Received January 22, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed
 10. Carnegie writes on the virtues of Mr. Griffin. He then expresses his desire for Frick to store up coke. He ends with his travel plans for Paris and a conference in Italy over the winter. Received January 22, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 11. Carnegie asks about Homestead's ability to produce armor plates to the Navy's specifications. January 23, 1890 Telegram
 12. Carnegie writes on the stock market's rise. He closes with a call "to bag Eland." Received January 28, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, February 1-17, 1890 5
 1. Carnegie writes from Santiago de Cuba that he will "Sail Saturday." February 1, 1890 Telegram
 2. Frick writes the beliefs of Mr. Jarrett that commerce is nearing its limits in England. In two handwritten post-scripts, Carnegie writes that Mr. Jarrett is wrong and that English commerce will grow despite increasing difficulty in getting raw materials. February 10, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Frick writes on Carnegie's companies' financial states. They are doing well and he recommends consolidating Carnegie Brothers and Co. with Carnegie Phipps and Co. February 10, 1890 Typescript Copy
 4. Frick writes that he will check into the Lauth patents. February 12, 1890 Typescript Copy
 5. Frick writes on the market, business with Semple, Kneeland and McKinney, hiring G. D. Packer as a lawyer, and that furnace "G" will be lighted on Friday. He also mentions debate over a large pipe at Stewart Station. February 12, 1890 Typescript Copy
 6. Carnegie writes on the business prospects of producing rails or armor plating. Received February 12, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed
 7. Frick writes that he agrees with Carnegie's views on following the market as they do in rails. He also enclosed a copy of a report on the furnaces and production. February 13, 1890 Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie writes on his intentions to sell pig iron according to market fluctuations. February 13, 1890 Telegram
 9. McCracken and Semple write their bid to purchase 16,500 tons of steel rails at $35.00 USD per ton. In multiple handwritten post-scripts, Carnegie writes his demands that an order be drawn up in writing by Knox and Read, advice to watch the details of such an order, and on the issue of collateral in the McCracken and Semple order. February 14, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Frick writes on the acceptance of McCracken and Semple's order. He also writes on the weak pig iron market, though he adds that concerns are being addressed. February 17, 1890 Typescript Copy
 11. Carnegie writes his desire to only make secure deals with proper collateral. He also recommends selling excess pig iron. He closes with his instructions for real estate purchases and Lauder's big pipe objection. February 16, 1890 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 12. Carnegie writes to advise Frick to buy Pittsburgh and Western Railroad from Semple. He does not wish to go into debt, but feels it was the time to buy. Answered February 17, 1890 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 13. [Writing below his previous letter], Carnegie writes that the Humphreys does not leave until Wednesday Evening and Frick can get options before that. Undated 
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Correspondence, February 19-March 5, 1890 6
 1. An agreement to sell stock shares predicated on a Baltimore and Ohio Railroad decision. February 19, 1890 Telegram
 2. Carnegie writes on pipes for gas and reducing gas consumption in the blast furnaces. February 22, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie writes from Washington D.C. on his feeling that there is no other consideration than Mr. Scott to relieve him as chairman. February 24, 1890 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 4. Frick writes that a gas pipeline order has been canceled and another will be adjusted. He also notes his feeling that Mr. Lauder was in favor of the pipeline at the time it was ordered. February 24, 1890 Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie writes on the balances of various partners and how much they owe. February 24, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 6. "Good Carrie will Carry Carrie." February 27, 1890 Telegram
 7. Frick writes that furnace "H" was lighted. Frick later adds, on March 3, 1892 his desire to meet with Carnegie in the coming week. February 28, 1890 Typescript Copy
 8. Frick writes on the market situation, the possibility of purchasing stock in different railroads, and he describes a potential site on which to build a library. February 28, 1890 Typescript Copy
 9. Carnegie writes on plans to create or purchase rail lines to ship coke in Pennsylvania. He discusses the dealings and plans of the other rail companies in the region. February 28, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 10. Frick writes Carnegie on the increase of orders for various materials. He also notes shipping conditions to the east and west. March 5, 1890 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, February 7-April 7, 1890 7
 1. Frick writes on land that could be purchased for coal development south of Homestead. March 6, 1890 Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes on holding patents in the North and West Virginia and waiting to sell patents to the Southern States. Received March 7, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 3. Frick writes that the gas pipeline situation is resolved with each mill receiving sufficient pressure. He also discusses renovations being done by the Illinois Steel Company in their rail mill in Southern Chicago. March 19, 1890 Typescript Copy
 4. Frick writes to ask if Carnegie will be in New York, NY Wednesday morning. March 22, 1890 Typescript Copy
 5. Frick writes on a tentative agreement to purchase stock in Pittsburgh and Western Common Rail Road. He also reports on production. April 1, 1890 Typescript Copy
 6. Carnegie writes on the purchase of Pittsburgh and Western Railroad stock and that, when the deal is finalized, aid should be given to thwart Baltimore and Ohio Railroad interference. Received April 2, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 7. Frick writes on rail orders being produced. April 3, 1890 Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie writes to instruct Frick to sell surplus material, particularly pig iron. April 3, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 9. Frick writes on the surplus pig iron situation. He also writes on the poor coke situation and a new gas field near Homestead. April 4, 1890 Typescript Copy
 10. Carnegie writes to express his satisfaction with March's figures. April 7, 1890 Telegram
 11. Carnegie writes on selling surplus and his feeling that the coke situation will right itself. Received April 5, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, April 17-June 12, 1890 8
 1. Carnegie writes from Washington D.C. on tactics to out compete Allegheny Steel as well as to protect his right to produce rails for Pittsburgh. Received April 17, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes from Washington D.C. on a dinner party at which he spoke with a Senator and was not asked about reduction. He also instructs Frick on coke consumption and pig iron production. April 17, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 3. Frick writes his travel plans to Philadelphia and then New York over the weekend. April 24, 1890 Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to persuade Frick to build his own railroad to reduce coke transportation costs and increase their companies' self-sufficiency. May 12, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes from New York to instruct Frick to buy stock in the Fair at Chicago citing the chance to improve already good business relations. In a handwritten post-script he also suggests [Kerptine B. Company] better make the offer and "Subscription to World's Fair." May 14, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Frick writes on changes in his travel plans, Mr. Dillon's work in Beaver Falls [Pa.], and Coke orders in comparison with other Coke companies. May 14, 1890 Typescript Copy
 7. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on continuing his efforts to persuade Frick to build his own Coke railroad. He also gives his feelings on the ore men's possible price reductions. In a handwritten post-script he writes, "Coke rates or." May 15, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Frick writes on the agreement reached with Pennsylvania Railroad over coke transportation. He also lists the cash and bills receivable for Carnegie Brothers and Company, Carnegie Phipps and Company, and the Frick Coke Company. May 27, 1890 Typescript Copy
 9. Frick lists the status of Bessemer, Carnegie Phipps and Company, pig, rails, gas line, Poor Farm, coke, and purchased coal land situations. June 4, 1890 Typescript Copy
 10. Frick writes the orders of rails sold in June to date. He also gives updates on the Edgar Thomson and McKeesport mills. He closes by declaring a good outlook on the year's business balance. June 12, 1890 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, June 26-July 24, 1890 9
 1. Frick writes on warm weather causing difficulties with rail production, poor earnings for May by Carnegie Phipps and Company and the Poor Farm situation. He updates the status of the new gas line, purchases of coal land, and the Penn and Westmorland strike. June 26, 1890 Typescript Copy
 2. Frick writes that Mr. Abbott will update Carnegie on the Armor Plate details. June 26, 1890 Typescript Copy
 3. Carnegie writes from Cluny Castle, [Scotland] on the Armor Plate issue and alternative bids to purchase Poor Farm, citing it as necessary to endeavors in armor making. He closes with orders for Frick to take his vacation and visit Cluny Castle. June 27, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Frick writes on the offer from Bethlehem Steel to make Armor Plate for the government. He also writes on June's operations and the resignation of Mr. Griffen from Keystone Bridge Company. July 3, 1890 Typescript Copy
 5. Frick writes on the Armor Plate order details from Bethlehem [Pa.]. July 3, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Samuel B. Dick, President of Butler and Shenango Railroad Co., writes Carnegie regarding an estimate to build a railroad between Summit, Indiana County, Pennsylvania, to Clearfield. He also mentions visiting New York, but acknowledges that he did not visit Carnegie because he heard that he was ill. There is also a not to Frick on the back of the letter written in pencil, which is faded, regarding the railroad line. July 13, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes from Cluny Castle, [Scotland] on the resignation of Mr. Griffen and proposes a merger between the Keystone Bridge Company and Carnegie Phipps and Company. He comments that it will take a year to get started in armor plating and the effort will be worthwhile. July 15, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Frick writes on his visit to the northwest and the tours he made of various companies. He then writes of his discussions on coke and rails with Illinois Steel Company. He closes with an update on the sale of Poor Farm and the Rod Mill at Beaver Falls. July 15, 1890 Typescript Copy
 9. Frick writes on his dealings with the Naval Secretary about armor plating. July 15, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Frick writes his desire to await Carnegie's October return before accepting the armor plating offer. July 17, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Frick writes that cooler temperatures have increased production. He then reports on Pittsburgh & Western, Semple and McCracken, coke, and postponing the armor negotiations. July 24, 1890 Typescript Copy
 12. Frick writes his desire to postpone Armor plating negotiations until October. July 24, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, July 25-August 30, 1890 10
 1. Frick writes on figures from Homestead and the lower production at a higher cost as reasons for waiting on the armor plates. July 25, 1890 Typescript Copy
 2. Frick writes on the Poor Farm bidding situation. They were outbid by Black and Baird though nothing is finalized. July 28, 1890 Typescript Copy
 3. Frick writes on his plan to stop rail shipments to Semple and McCracken for fear that they may be unable to ensure their end of the contract. July 29, 1890 Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie writes to congratulate the expensive but successful acquisition of Poor Farm. He writes on armor and the potential to begin producing it for order the United States and Russia. August 3, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes to say that Oliver making coke is not serious. "Frick can't play second fiddle to anybody…." August 8, 1890 Telegram
 6. Carnegie writes from Cluny Castle, [Scotland] to congratulate Frick on the purchase of Poor Farm and to instruct him on how the land should be used. He then writes on armor plating and the poor output from Carnegie Phipps and Co. under Abbott and Potter. August 12, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes that he will see Frick long before any action is necessary. August 15, 1890 Telegram
 8. Frick writes on acquiring land adjacent to Poor Farm, Edgar Thomson and Homestead furnaces, and the new gas line. He then address a variety of issues ranging from Semple and McCracken and the Pittsburgh & Western Railroad to coke. August 19, 1890 Typescript Copy
 9. Carnegie writes from Kingussie, [Scotland] on problems and poor management mistakes by Abbott. August 28, 1890 Telegram
 10. Carnegie writes from Laggan, [Scotland] on conditions of penalty acceptance despite causes beyond their control. August 29, 1890 Telegram
 11. Frick writes on Abbott and Wanamaker, Semple and Patton. He also reports that the new gas line is a success. August 29, 1890 Typescript Copy
 12. Carnegie writes from Kingussie, Scotland about Abbott meeting Tracey. He also writes that Lauder is in Leeds about duplicate Cammiel tools. August 30, 1890 Telegram
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Correspondence, September 10-November 14, 1890 11
 1. Carnegie writes on armor orders and his plans to return from Cluny Castle to the United States. In a handwritten post-script, he writes on bad crop reports and his imminent departure. September 10, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes on additions he proposes at Edgar Thomson, in light of the declining demand for rails, to allow the plant to produce tin bars, billets, etc. October 20, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie writes on gathering resources in order to avoid the situations of Bethlehem Steel (shutting down) and Chicago, which is described as being in "deep water." He also writes that Mrs. Carnegie has typhoid fever. October 30, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie instructs Frick to make no concessions in payment of interest to Parks, as he is not in a condition to demand it. October 31, 1890 Telegram
 5. Carnegie writes on his disappointment in the management of the Pittsburgh and Western Railroad. He instructs Frick to find someone who can do the job well. He also includes a stock report on the Pittsburgh and Western. November 1, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes that he is to be at home all day on November 2 and that he has seen Clark. November 1, 1890 Telegram
 7. Carnegie writes that [unmentioned person] is at the mercy of the company. November 4, 1890 Telegram
 8. Carnegie writes on Schwab's success in rail mills and then advices Frick to read daily reports sometimes. November 11, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] with instructions to slow production and sell the stock piles of product that have been allowed to grow. November 12, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on how to handle rail production with Chicago for the coming year. November 12, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Frick writes to Carnegie to update him on the situation of the company and measures being taken to eliminate excess product. November 13, 1890 Typescript Copy
 12. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on measures to be taken to protect profits as railroad stocks drop and rail orders cease. November 13, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 13. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on selling siding, etc. to railroads to reduce excess product. In a handwritten post-script, Carnegie calls for careful watching. November 14, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 14. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on his delight in Frick's report that things are in better shape than he thought. He expects to meet Frick and "Harry" on November 15. November 14, 1890 Telegram
 15. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on possible agreements for rail production with Illinois Steel Company. He cites Pittsburgh's location as reason to reach an arrangement of equality between the two. November 14, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, November 18-25, 1890 12
 1. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on agreements he feels should be made between partners. These deal with consolidating mill funds and steel price arrangements. In a handwritten post-script he writes of the importance of keeping equity with Chicago. November 18, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on reducing the stockpile of second quality rails, even if prices must be reduced. November 20, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 3. [Frick writes below Carnegie's previous letter] to ask for Schwab to note and return Carnegie's letter. November 25, 1890 
 4. [Schwab writes below Frick and Carnegie's letter] to thank Frick for his confidence on the present policy for second class rails. November 26, 1890 
 5. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to describe the rising stock market. November 21, 1890 Telegram
 6. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to advice Frick to only sell rails for cash as he believes the market will weaken. November 24, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to tell Frick that stockpiles should of pig iron should be depleted. November 24, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to demand closer management of stocks and collections due to excess credit and lack of proper financing. November 24, 1890 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on the potential to do business with a Mr. Pratt after fixing collections policy. November 24, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to say that while Chicago will not produce as much for the year, they should still be made to feel as an equal if they combine with Carnegie Steel. November 25, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on selling pig iron excess, even at a greatly reduced price and giving notes to purchases previously made in cash. In a handwritten post-script, Carnegie describes the pig iron situations at various mills. November 25, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Carnegie writes to advise selling pig iron to eastern companies and to congratulate Frick on accepting Mexican business. In handwritten post-scripts, Carnegie suggests sales to Cleveland Belt of Quincy second rails and asks about "Mr. N's" requirements. November 25, 1890 Typescript Copy Telegram
 13. Carnegie writes to say that he has not read Frick's note about Roberts. November 25, 1890 Telegram
 14. Frick writes his responses to Carnegie's various letters on collections, pig iron stockpiles, and Ohio business. November 25, 1890 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, November 26-December 11, 1890 13
 1. Carnegie writes that every effort should be made to sell and his disappointment with Leishman for not selling. Undated Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes about Scranton and Clark meeting. November 26, 1890 Telegram
 3. Frick writes to inform Carnegie of endeavors to build a Southern Youghiogheny Railroad. November 28, 1890 Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie writes for an explanation on shipping price of Bessemer pig iron. December 1890 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes to propose a possible way for Frick to deal with the Pennsylvania Railroad as the business provided by shipping Frick's coke is leverage in dealing with the railroad. December 4, 1890 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Frick writes on his continued efforts with the Pennsylvania Railroad. December 8, 1890 Typescript Copy
 7. Carnegie writes about advances in wages being out of the question under the current circumstances. December 9, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Carnegie writes to stipulate various requirements to any deal with the Pennsylvania Railroad, such as rail production through January 1 before closure for refurbishment. Undated Autographed Letter Signed
 9. This telegram describes the terms of Bessemer pig sales for "booty dollars," meaning prompt cash for quick shipments. December 10, 1890 Telegram
 10. Carnegie writes that Frick should get $2 USD rate to ship to Scranton with no price under $15 USD net. December 11, 1890 Telegram
 11. Carnegie writes to ask about Frick's meeting with "Fifth Avenue man" and his satisfaction at not having to go lower than $17 USD for pig iron sales. December 12, 1890 Telegram
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Correspondence, December 15-26, 1890 14
 1. Carnegie writes from New York to say that rails should only be sold for cash. December 15, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes about steel prices and competition with Chicago, noting Pittsburgh's advantages. He also writes on "Mrs. C's" [Carnegie's] condition. Received December 19, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 3. Frick writes on his joy at Mrs. Carnegie's improving health, the projected figures for selling excess pig iron, and a new order for rails. December 22, 1890 Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie writes on the potential candidates to relieve the sickly Mr. Leishman and gives instruction on the finances between Carnegie Phipps and Company and Carnegie Brothers and Company. December 22, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes on the acceptable price of steel and that territorial rights should be sought with Chicago over equal division. He adds that Mrs. Carnegie's health is doing well. Received December 20, 1890 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes his dismay with the Chicago pool developments and scolds Frick for not doing better. Received December 22, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes from New York on his surprise at Clark. December 22, 1890 Telegram
 8. Carnegie writes from New York on his surprise at Clark and instructs to scoop everything. December 22, 1890 Telegram
 9. Carnegie writes from New York to propose the acquisition of 15,000 Pennsylvania and Western shares and thereby gain absolute control. December 26, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Carnegie writes from New York to wish all a Merry Christmas and congratulate them on a good year. December 26, 1890 Telegram
 11. Carnegie writes from New York to say he has signed the Eno letter and that his wife is doing well. December 26, 1890 Telegram
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Correspondence, December 27, 1890-January 19, 1891 4821
 1. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses negotiations with "B.&.O. R.R." [Baltimore and Ohio Railroad] over the purchase of "P.&.W." [Pittsburgh and Western]. A handwritten note at the top of the letter requests Frick to wire $50,000 to E.D. Morgan Company. December 27,1890 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie discusses negotiations over a deal with "B.&.O." [Baltimore and Ohio Railroad] and refers to an accident at "United" [United Coal and Coke Company]. Letter attached to Andrew Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick, December 27, 1890. December 27,1890 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie discuses the deal with "B.&.O." [Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]. Letter attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick, December 27, 1890. December 30, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie discusses the trading of bonds in the deal with "B.&.O." [Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]. December 27, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 5. Frick discusses financial matters involving Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company and their interest in purchasing Pittsburgh and Western. He also discusses the sale of rails and pig iron, the health of Mrs. Carnegie and the accident at the United Coal and Coke Company Works. December 27, 1890 Typescript Copy
 6. Frick discusses matters concerning the deal to purchase Pittsburgh and Western by Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company. December 29, 1890 Typescript Copy
 7. Frick informs Carnegie that he has received his reply to his letter concerning the difficulty with the blast furnace men at the Edgar Thomson works. Frick goes to discuss his opinions on how to handle any labor disruptions at the works. December 30, 1890 Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie advises Frick on how to approach the handling of the labor relations at the Edgar Thomason works. December 31, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 9. Writing from New York, Carnegie requests Frick to produce a statement that will indicate the amount of stock of product and material housed at their various works. January 5, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 10. A note consisting of a chart listing the of number shares, value per share and total value owned by Frick in the Henry Clay Frick Coke Company, Union Supply Company Limited, Youghiogheny Northern Railroad Company, Youghiogheny Water Company and Mount. Pleasant Water Company. [Note attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick], January 5, 1891. January 1, 1891 
 11. A memorandum from Secretary and Auditor of Carnegie Brothers and Company Limited [Francis] Lovejoy, listing stock of finished product and materials as of December 1, 1890. Letter attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick, January 5, 1891. January 7, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Frick indicates that on his request Mr. Lovejoy has prepared a statement of both [Carnegie Brothers and Company and Carnegie, Phipps and Company}, which compares stock of finished product and material for use on January 1, 1890, October 1, 1890 and December 1, 1890. January 7, 1891 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 13. Writing from New York City, Carnegie discusses a meeting in New York with a Mr. Smith, a leading Director of the Fourth National, a Director of the Fifth Avenue Banks, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the United States Trust Company and Vice President of Merchants. A handwritten note appears at the end of the letter, in which Carnegie states he has received Frick's note and refers to an issuing of a paper. January 8, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 14. Frick discusses a deal to sell their interest in Pittsburgh and Western to Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The letter mentions enclosing a copy of letter from Mr. Pitcairn, however this letter is not present. January 10, 1891 Typescript Copy
 15. Carnegie sends a telegraph from New York City, stating an offer was submitted by Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. January 17, 1891 Telegram
 16. Frick discusses negotiations with Baltimore and Ohio Railroad along with labor and wage issues. January 19, 1891 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, January 20-March 14, 1891 2
 1. Writing From New York City, Carnegie discusses negotiations with Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and advises Frick on the matter of production. A handwritten note appears at the bottom of the letter, in which Carnegie advises on the placement and loading of coke. January 20, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie announces the closure of a deal from New York City between Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. January 22, 1891 Telegram
 3. Frick informs Carnegie that he has received his [telegram] of January 22 about the Pittsburgh and Western deal. He indicates that he has enclosed a letter from Mr. Lauder, however this letter is not present. January 23, 1891 Typescript Copy
 4. Writing from New York City, Carnegie discusses their policy in regards to the sale of pig iron, scrap and finished materials of all kind and refers to depending on the "coke question." Also, he states the life in the rail market and mentions a possible visit to Pittsburgh, Pa.. January 26, 1891 Types Letter Signed
 5. Writing from New York, Carnegie states he would like to contribute five thousand dollars in relief to Mammoth mine workers. January 28, 1891 Telegram Typescript Copy
 6. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses the deal with Baltimore and [Ohio Railroad]. January 29, 1891 Telegram
 7. Carnegie discusses the Homestead [accounting] book and compares production and the wage scale to other mills and announces his interest in conducting a thorough investigation of homestead labor forces. January 30, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Frick announces he arrive in New York on the fourth for rail makers meeting and that an agreement was signed between Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company and Carnegie Brothers and Company, Limited. February 2, 1891 Typescript Copy
 9. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses young partners and the percentage of their shares in the company. February 9, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses freight rates on the transfer of coke and the rate of pig iron. February 9, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Carnegie discusses stock price in correlation with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad deal. February 9, 1891 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 12. Frick discusses several matters including Keystone Bridge Company, the supply of natural gas to Duquesne mill, labor relations and Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company. March 11, 1891 Typescript Copy
 13. Frick discusses natural gas investment for the purpose of supplying their mills with gas. March 14, 1891 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, March 16-27, 1891 3
 1. Frick announces that the deal with Baltimore and Ohio Railroad "is now absolutely closed" and discusses the details of the transaction. The newspaper clipping enclosed with letter, however is not present. March 16, 1891 Typescript Copy
 2. Writing from New York, Carnegie refers to taking care of the common. March 17, 1891 Telegram
 3. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses the use of gas to make steam, Homestead works, a process for making plate armor and coke rates. March 17, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie writes from Washington, D.C. and discusses the price of bonds and common stock. March 19, 1891 Telegram Typescript Copy
 5. Writing from Washington, D. C., Carnegie discusses the price of bonds and common stock. March 19, 1891 Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Frick discusses posting the scale of wages that their willing to pay at their coke works. March 20, 1891 Typescript Copy
 7. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses falling prices and stock, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad deal and the production of plate armor. A handwritten note at the end of the letter mentions a visit to Pittsburgh, Pa. in early April. March 21, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Carnegie discusses the selling of bonds to New York interests. March 24, 1891 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York and inquires about purchasing a larger interest in Carnegie' s associations. March 26, 1891 Typescript Copy
 10. Writing from New York, Carnegie informs Frick that he has enclosed a newspaper clipping entitled, "The Outlook of the Lake Fleet." Also, he refers to the "coke situation" and their competitors Columbia Steel and Iron Company and Otis Steel Company. March 27, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, March 28-April 22, 1891 4
 1. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses Keystone [Bridge Works] and Chicago Bridge Works. March 28, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses the proposed plan to have Carnegie and Phipps and Company buy Keystone Bridge Works and dissolve the company. He then advises against the purchase of an independent bridge building company in Chicago. Typed postscript discusses the Harvey process for making armor and building the necessary plant with government money to produce the armor. Letter attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick, March 28, 1891. March 16, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Letter discusses the business of bridge building and states that in order for Carnegie, Phipps and Company to compete, they will have to create a bridge department. Letter attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick, March 28, 1891. undated Typed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie states his delight that Frick desires to increase his interest in [Carnegie associations] and also refers to the "Margain" idea. March 29, 1891 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie advises Frick on labor issues, stating there are two plans open to pursue. The first concerns standing by a set scale, running works free from all labor organizations and pressuring the governor to send aid to keep the peace. The second option concerns persuading labor leaders to compromise old wages then work for a year under these arrangements. April 1, 1891 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses the details of sale of eight percent of his interest to Frick. Typed postscript refers to a circular enclosed pertaining to Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, however the circular is not present. Also, Carnegie advises Frick to read his letter of advice he sent to Mr. Abbott. April 13, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Writing to Carnegie in New York, Frick discusses the sale of eight percent of Carnegie's interest to him, the price of ore, sale of billets and rails and reading the letter of advice to Mr. Abbott. April 14, 1891 Typescript Copy
 8. Frick informs Carnegie that he has read his letter of advice to Mr. Abbott and concurs with his advice. April 14, 1891 Typescript Copy
 9. Frick indicates receiving Carnegie's telegram about armor and states "All hands will assist, and do everything possible to hasten the completion of the mill." April 16, 1891 Typescript Copy
 10. Writing to Carnegie in New York, Frick discusses his arrangement for one hundred Pinkerton men to be sent to Leisenring No. 2 and be deputized by the sheriff of Fayette County, Pa. in order to protect those willing to work. Also, Frick discusses production at the Edgar Thomason mill and the pressure and demand for coke because of the strike in the coke region. April 20, 1891 Typescript Copy
 11. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York informing him that the one hundred Pinkerton men arrived at Leisenring No.2 today and were sworn in as deputies. Also, he discusses the gathering of coke in the Connellsville region, the purchase of ore and mentions an explosion at one of the converting works that afternoon, in which a few men were slightly burned. April 21, 1891 Typescript Copy
 12. Carnegie discusses the strike and advises on how to negotiate with the workers. April 22, 1891 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 13. Frick discusses a letter received from Mr. Lauder in which he advises on the forging small and large rolls. April 22, 1891 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, April 28-July 14, 1891 5
 1. Frick discusses the coke strike and in particular activity at the Adelaide, Leisenring and Moorewood coke works in the counties of [Fayette and Westmoreland, Pa.] April 28, 1891 Typescript Copy
 2. Writing from New York, Carnegie outlines the details of payments to be made to him by Frick. The payments pertain to Frick's [purchase of interest] in Carnegie Brothers and Company, Limited and Carnegie and Phipps and Company, Limited. The letter is also signed by a witness named Robert [T]urnbull. May 1, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Frick discusses the coke strike, the order of billets and rails, the price and purchase of pig iron and the running of the Homestead works by Mr. Childs. Included at the end of the letter, a typescript copy of note, which states, "Memo K.F.O., Strike settled about June 1st." May 21, 1891 Typescript Copy
 4. A message from Carnegie stating, "Earnest Eagle vote early McClure." May 26, 1891 Telegram
 5. Writing from North "Mymms" Park, Hatfield, Herts, [England], Carnegie discusses his trip and his intention to travel to Cluny Castle and the "McClure price". June 14, 1891 Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Frick discusses a visit from Secretary Folger regarding the manufacturing of armor. June 22, 1891 Typescript Copy
 7. Writing from Kingussie, [Scotland], Carnegie discusses an agreement over the handling of option stock. In a handwritten note at the end of the letter, Carnegie announces his arrival at Cluny Castle and that the boys are arriving Wednesday with Mrs. General Custer and perhaps Mrs. Burton Harrison. June 29, 1891 Typescript Copy Typed Letter Signed
 8. Writing from Kingussie, [Scotland], [Carnegie] sends a message responding to Frick at Cresson, [Pa]. July 6, 1891 Telegraph
 9. Writing to Carnegie at Cluny Castle, Scotland, Frick provides a detailed account of a strike at Duquesne works and the negotiations to resolve it. The enclosed statements and newspaper clippings are not present. July 7, 1891 Typescript Copy
 10. Writing from Kingussie, [Scotland], Carnegie mentions the "boys" leaving and the strike at [Duquesne works]. July 8, 1891 Telegram
 11. In telegraph from Kingussie, [Scotland], Carnegie mentions a guarantee. July 11, 1891 Telegram
 12. Frick discusses the labor situation at the Duquesne works and the effect of the strike on employees at Carnegie, Phipps and Company and the Amalgamated Association. July 14, 1891 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, July 15-September 4, 1891 6
 1. Writing to Carnegie in Kingussie, [Scotland], [Frick] discusses bonds and states the armor plant will be "ready for business in ten days." July 15, 1891 Typescript Copy
 2. [Carnegie] congratulates Frick and inquires if still planning to travel to [Europe]. July 18, 1891 Telegram
 3. Carnegie discusses the business problems of "A. & W.K. Nimick of Pittsburgh, Frick's family stay at Cresson, Pa. and mentions revising his [essay] ABC of Money. July 27, 1891 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 4. Writing from Cluny Castle, [Scotland], Carnegie discusses orders for rails, the Oliver Mortgage and armor mill. Handwritten note at the end of the letter that states, [W.H.] Singer's "family left us week ago-had a good time." August 14, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Frick discusses several matters that include the condition of the "money market"; the order of rails; the operation and production at various works, including Edgar Thomson and Duquesne and various other concerns relating to Carnegie Brothers and Company and Carnegie, Phipps and Company. The enclosed statement about net earnings and Mr. Childs letter are not present. August 19, 1891 Typescript Copy
 6. Writing from Cluny Castle, [Scotland], Carnegie refers to the "ominous outlook of armor," and discusses the European crop failure and predicts the higher prices will bring a boom in iron and steel the following spring. Handwritten note at the end of letter advises on a "rails." August 21, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Writing to Carnegie in Kingussie, Scotland, [Frick] informs Carnegie on testing for the government for the [production of armor] plates. August 21, 1891 Typescript Copy
 8. Writing from Cluny Castle, Kingussie, [Scotland], Carnegie councils Frick on setting the price of rails and keeping watch on Mr. Scranton and his success with the selling of rails. Also, he discusses the outlook of business in the coming months. August 26, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Writing from Cluny Castle, Kingussie, [Scotland], Carnegie states, "we are in for a boom," predicting a profitable year in business in 1892. Also, he advises on and discusses the Harvey process for producing [armor] plates for the government. September 1, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Writing to [Carnegie] in Kingussie, [Scotland], Frick states, "high boom" in relation to the failing crops in [Europe] and advises on the production of armor plate. September 3, 1891 Telegram
 11. Writing to Carnegie in Kingussie, [Scotland], [Frick] informs Carnegie that [Commodore] Folger [Chief of Bureau of Ordnance for U.S. Navy] visited and was pleased with progress in the [production of armor plate]. September 4, 1891 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, September 7-October 5, 1891 7
 1. Writing to Carnegie in Kingussie, Scotland, Frick informs him of his visit to the Homestead mill with Mr. Abbott and states, "improvements well in hand." September 7, 1891 Typescript Copy
 2. Frick discusses the possibilities of purchasing Sparrow Points works and armor production for government shipbuilding. September 9, 1891 Typescript Copy
 3. Writing from Cluny Castle, Kingussie, [Scotland], Carnegie discusses his feelings on the production of armor; comments on the sail of rails for August and predicts a profitable year in 1892 because of failing crops in Europe. September 9, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Writing from Kingussie, [Scotland], Carnegie states, "Correct sell few big lots private terms market soon brisk abolish might duplicate baggage." September 11, 1891 Telegram
 5. Frick informs Carnegie of the progress made in the production of armor for the government. The two messages from Commodore Folger and a letter from Mr. Childs, which Frick says he has enclosed are not present. September 15, 1891 Typescript Copy
 6. Writing from Cluny Castle, Kingussie, [Scotland], Carnegie discusses rail production in the eastern and western [U.S.], and announces the arrival of Mr. Abbott and Mr. Kerr in Scotland. Letter signed by [P.W.. Finnegan]. September 19, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Writing from Cluny Castle, Kingussie, [Scotland], Carnegie discusses the "old rail market" and the manufacturing of splice bars. September 21, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Frick discusses dealings with the government over the manufacturing of [armor]. Statements and correspondence enclosed by Frick are not present. September 21, 1891 Typescript Copy
 9. Message states, "Wrote enclosing Mr. Knox's opinion, copy armor contract. S.S. Normania." Typescript copy a "Lead -pencil memorandum in letter book." September 22, 1891 Typescript Copy
 10. Writing Carnegie in Kingussie, [Scotland], Frick informs Carnegie on several matters that include Sparrows Point [works], demand of product, injunction of Philadelphia company and ""Harveyized" plates." September 28, 1891 Typescript Copy
 11. [Carnegie] sends message from Kingussie, [Scotland], advising Frick on eastern mills, options and "future contract prices". September 28, 1891 Telegram
 12. Writing from London, [Carnegie] states, "Contract amazing hope question kept open address Morgan." Handwritten note at the bottom of the telegram states, "Repeated to Wooster, Ohio." October 5, 1891 Telegram
 13. Writing from Cluny Castle, Kingussie, [Scotland], Carnegie discusses Sparrows Point [works] and the production of rail mills in the east and the west. Also, he mentions he will travel to Dunfermline, London and Paris. Letter attached to Henry Clay Frick to Andrew Carnegie, October 5, 1891. September 29, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, October 16-December 4, 1891 8
 1. Writing from [London, England], Carnegie informs Frick that he is "just off for Paris" and discusses and councils him on developments concerning the manufacturing of plate armor. October 7, 1891 Autographed Letter Signed
 2. Frick informs Carnegie of armor tests conducted on Saturday. The enclosed copy of the letter from Mr. Stone to Mr. Abbott are not present. November 3, 1891 Typescript Copy
 3. Writing from New York, Carnegie instructs Frick to have "H.P." [Henry Phipps] accompany him to [New York]; their they will deliberate on matters, then Carnegie, himself, will accompany Frick to meetings out west. November 13, 1891 Telegram
 4. Writing to Carnegie in New York, Frick discusses the details of the upcoming meeting in New York with Mr. Linderman and Mr. Davenport. Also, Frick discusses a matter involving Carbon Iron Company and a letter dictated by Carnegie. The enclosed copy of the letter from Lieutenant Stone to Mr. Abbott is not present. Letter attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick, November 13, 1891. November 21, 1891 Typescript Copy
 5. Writing to Carnegie in New York, Frick indicates he has received $2,045.00 of capital of the Union Supply Company, Limited. November 23, 1891 Typesrcipt Copy
 6. Carnegie writes from New York and discusses a contract and a two million second mortgage on the sale of undisclosed properties. Also, Carnegie comments on [William] Rainey. November 1891 Telegram
 7. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York and informs him that nothing has been received from Secretary [of the Navy] [Benjamin] Tracy. November 27, 1891 Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie discusses the opening of old mill at the "E.T." [Edgar Thomson], manufacturing of split bars, re-rolling old steel rails and a matter involving Mr. Roberts [from Pennsylvania Railroad]. Also, he informs Frick he will attend the launching of the [ship] New York in Philadelphia. December 1, 1891 Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York informing him "nothing new in armor" from Bethlehem, [Pa] or the Secretary [Benjamin Tracy]. Also, Frick mentions the launching of the [ship] New York in Philadelphia and a matter involving Mr. Abbott. December 1, 1891 Typescript Copy
 10. Writing from New York, Carnegie informs Frick that, "Saw Bethlehem people yesterday-all right also Folger-Tracy-Writing you today." December 3, 1891 Telegram
 11. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses matters involving their contract with the government to produce armor for the navy and announces his intention to visit Washington, D.C. December 3, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses the "Tower project" planned for an upcoming exhibition. December 3, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 13. A letter to the president of the Illinois Steel Company, Chicago, Ill., in which [Frick] states the agreement reached in regard to the division of the rail business between Illinois Steel Company and the Carnegie Associations for two years. A handwritten note on the verso side of the letter by Frick elaborates on the aforementioned deal between the two associations. Attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick, December 3, 1891. December 9, 1891 Typed Letter
 14. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York and discusses the two factions in Bethlehem, [Pa.] and their dealings with the government. December 4, 1891 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, December 9-30, 1891 9
 1. Frick informs Carnegie on matters involving the production of armor for [Naval] ships. December 9, 1891 Typescript Copy
 2. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York informing him on the manufacturing of armor. Letter attached to Henry Clay Frick to Andrew Carnegie, December 9, 1891. December 15, 1891 Typescript Copy
 3. Writing from Washington, D.C., Abbott informs Frick "that our status is favorable and believe matters will be adjusted." December 10, 1891 Telegram
 4. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses matters occurring in Washington, D.C. that involve [William] Abbott. December 11, 1891 Telegram
 5. [Henry] Phipps, Jr. writes from Pasadena, California informing Frick that he "will execute and mail the document tonight" and that Mr. Vandovert health is improving and will arrive in Pittsburgh on the twenty fourth. December 12, 1891 Telegram
 6. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York briefly commenting on "the armor matter" and Mr. Abbott's involvement. Attached to [Henry] Phipps Jr. to Henry Clay Frick, December 12, 1891. December 12, 1891 Typescript Copy
 7. Carnegie writes Frick from New York enclosing replies to the "Tower question" and letters from A.L. Griffith and Henry Gardner. Attached to [Henry] Phipps Jr. to Henry Clay Frick, December 12, 1891. December 12, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Writing from New York to A.L. Griffin, president of the Keystone Bridge Company in Pittsburgh, Pa., Carnegie discusses his concern over the a tower to be built for an exhibition, [the World's Fair]. Attached to [Henry] Phipps Jr. to Henry Clay Frick, December 12, 1891. December 12, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Writing from New York, Carnegie informs Henry A. Gardner that he has enclosed a copy of his reply to Mr. Griffin. Attached to [Henry] Phipps Jr. to Henry Clay Frick, December 12, 1891. December 12, 1891 Typed Letter
 10. Gardner writes from Chicago and discusses the American Tower Company and his involvement in the organization to help build a tower at the World's Fair ground in Chicago. Attached to [Henry] Phipps Jr. to Henry Clay Frick, December 12, 1891. December 10, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Griffin writes to Carnegie in New York about raising funds to build a tower in Chicago for the [World's Fair]. Attached to [Henry] Phipps Jr. to Henry Clay Frick, December 12, 1891. December 11, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses matters involving a Mr. Strobel at the Keystone Bridge Company and talks of a merger of the company. He also makes reference to the [tower project for the World's Fair]. December 16, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 13. Writing from New York, Carnegie informs Frick that his report on "Upper and Lower mills received" and discusses an upcoming meeting with "Mr. Lindemann". Letter signed by "P.W.F. Secretary" [P.W. Finnegan]. December 17, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 14. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses testing of steel at Bethlehem, Pa used for to make [armor] plates and advises Frick on the "labor question" at Homestead. December 19, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 15. Writing from New York, Carnegie informs Frick he enclosed a letter from [Secretary of State] a Mr. [James G.] Blaine and requests his council. Enclosed letter not present. December 19, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 16. Frick informs Carnegie of receipt of his letter from December 19 and states he favors a "fixed price of (.30) for nickel steel. December 21, 1891 Typescript Copy
 17. Writing from New York, Carnegie informs Frick of his intention to travel to Washington, D.C. after the first of the year to meet with Secretary Tracy and discuss the manufacturing and price of [armor]. December 24, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 18. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York, stating his pleasure on hearing of his interview with Secretary Tracy and wishes fro the Secretary to visit the Homestead mill. [Attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry clay Frick], December 24, 1891. December 26, 1891 Typescript Copy
 19. Writing to Carnegie in New York, Frick discusses matters involving the production of armor for the ship Monterey. December 29, 1891 Typescript Copy
 20. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses Chapin's ore and "B.&.O." [Baltimore and Ohio Railroad] stock. December 30, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, January 4-29, 1892 10
 1. Writing from New York, Carnegie advises Frick on the purchase of twelve acres of land and options on "P.& W." [Pittsburgh and Western] bonds. January 4, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Frick informs Carnegie that the "armor question with the government settled" and that they are "in excellent shape for the coming good year's business." January 6, 1892 Typescript Copy
 3. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses matters involving Bethlehem, Pa. pertaining to the manufacturing of armor plates and mentions a trip to California on January 15, with Frick accompany him. January 9, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses new blast furnaces, Keystone Bridge Company, production of Structural beams, cost of heating mills and armor plate tests. Handwritten note refers to prices. January 9, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York and discusses matters involving the production of armor plates for the government. January 11, 1892 Typescript Copy
 6. Carnegie writes from New York saying, "Good honesty the best policy serves an ungrateful man just right." January 16, 1892 Telegram
 7. Writing from New York, Carnegie advises Frick on his attempt to change rail prices. Handwritten note at the end of the letter mentions a trip to California. January 16, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York to discuss a matter involving Carnegie Brothers and Company and Carnegie, Phipps and Company owing Mrs. Lucy Carnegie "$1.602.065.91" and encloses letters from Secretary Lovejoy. January 22, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Mr. Lovejoy informs [Frick] of a real estate purchase by a Captain J.J. Vandergrift on Sixth Avenue in Pittsburgh and his offer to build their association a new office building, to rent for a set number of years. Letter attached to Henry Clay Frick to Andrew Carnegie, January 22, 1892. January 13, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Carnegie discusses the growth of "the firm" and gives no objection in proceeding to secure a permanent building [for Carnegie Associations in Pittsburgh]. [Handwritten on the verso of letter from F.T. Lovejoy to Henry Clay Frick.] undated 
 11. Lovejoy provides financial figures detailing the associations expenditures at their office buildings, the Exchange Bank Building and Chronicle Telegraph. Attached to Henry Clay Frick to Andree Carnegie, January 22, 1892. January 13, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Writing from New York, Carnegie talks about a two hundred fifty thousand dollar net from the Philadelphia Company. Enclosed clippings of are not present. January 29, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 13. A note containing three signatures, two by Carnegie and one by [J. G. Leishman]. Carnegie writes "Let this be framed as illustrating the freaks of [G]enuis. [J.G. Leishman] writes "Fifty Thousand" and Carnegie responds by writing "you will get 250,000 easily". Attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick, January 29, 1892. undated Telegram
 14. A note from Carnegie in which he says "Let us be merciful with our assumptions" possibly referring to a figure written at the top of note stating "$50,000.00." Attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick, January 29, 1892. undated Telegram
 15.  Writing to Carnegie in New York, Frick informs him of the production of armor that month and lack of forthcoming information from Secretary Tracy on shipping instructions for the armor. January 29, 1892 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, February 1-March 31, 1892 11
 1. Carnegie writes from New York and discusses the matter of the "new beam mill" and refers to a future trip to California with Frick accompany him. February 1, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses "new beam mill" and the production of armor at Homestead. Handwritten note at the end of the letter states, "Judge Reed arrived and is now at work." February 3, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York and assumes responsibility for an oversight at the "cogging mills and new beam mill", and also discusses the production of armor. February 5, 1892 Typescript Copy
 4. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses transfer of stock to Mr. Gayley and Morrison, finding the partner responsible in the "table oversight" and the price of ore. February 6, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 5. A postscript from a excerpt of letter on February 6, 1892 addressed to Andrew Carnegie in New York from Henry clay Frick. Frick discusses his views on the manufacturing of armor. February 6, 1892 Typescript Copy
 6. A memo that refers to Carnegie having "no actual objection to admitting stock value on principle an also states, "contrast therefore, with his attitude 7 years later towards H.C.F." undated Autographed Letter
 7. Carnegie discusses the details of Mr. Abbott's retirement. Attached to undated memo from "unspecified." March 2, 1892 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 8. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York and reports on the condition of their armor manufacturing business in the month of March. March 30, 1892 Typescript Copy
 9. Frick informs Carnegie that he has revised the article, written by Carnegie, on Mr. Abbott's retirement and announces Mr. Childs will assume command of the Homestead. Attached to Henry Clay Frick to Andrew Carnegie, March 30, 1892. April 1, 1892 Typescript Copy
 10. Writing to Carnegie in New York, Frick informs him on matters involving the manufacturing of armor. Attached to Henry Clay Frick to Andrew Carnegie, March 30, 1892. April 9, 1892 Typescript Copy
 11. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York, informing him of the production armor. Attached to Henry Clay Frick to Andrew Carnegie, March 30, 1892. April 11, 1892 Typescript Copy
 12. Frick writes to Carnegie in New York, informing him on developments in the armor business. Attached to Henry Clay Frick to Andrew Carnegie, March 30, 1892. April 21, 1892 Typescript Copy
 13. Writing from New York, Carnegie says he hopes "the matter" can be managed without publicity. A handwritten postscript discusses the matter of armor tests. Enclosed letter no present. March 31, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 14. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses the salaries of clerks at Carnegie, Phipps and Company and recommends the need to eliminate several of the positions. Handwritten postscript that makes reference to Pennsylvania Railroad and Homestead. March 31, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, April 1-11, 1892 12
 1. Writing from New York, Carnegie makes reference to a matter contained in an enclosed letter involving William P. De Armit, President [of] New York and Cleveland Coal Company. April 1, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie states his belief that Mr. Abbott's retirement should be announced publicly in the papers. Attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick, April 1, 1892. April 1, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 3. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses Mr. Childs opportunity to "prove or disprove his ability" [after the retirement of William Abbott]. Also, Carnegie lays out a possible settlement for William Abbott's retirement. Handwritten note at the end of the letter talks about a rail line to Beaver Falls, [Pa]. April 2, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie discusses the settlement [William] Abbott will receive in his retirement. April 2, 1892 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 5. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses railroad routes to Duquesne and Homestead. April 4, 1892 Telegram
 6. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses a conversation a with Mr. Andrews about "the right to use the patents for own business." Carnegie refers to Judge Ewing's decision in the Schoenberger case in the postscript. April 7, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Writing from New York, Carnegie advises Frick on a matter involving a Vanderbilt offer on rail lines and rates between Edgar Thomson, Homestead and Homestead. April 8, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses rail line routes to Duquesne, Edgar Thomson and Homestead. April 9, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses and advises Frick on how to handle the production cost at Edgar Thomson and Homestead. April 11, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Writing from New York, Carnegie states that Mr. Schwab should try "recarbonizing" with coke dust. Several handwritten notes comment further on this subject involving Mr. Schwab. April 11, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Writing from New York, Carnegie inquires about the production of steel axles for "B.& O." [Baltimore and Ohio Railroad] and "P.R.R. [Pennsylvania Railroad]. April 11, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Carnegie writes on Mr. Messler's son going into business with Carnegie, but he suggests that he work his way in through Frick, Leishman or Mr. Childs rather than through Carnegie or Lauder. April 11, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, April 13-May 13, 1892 13
 1. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses the difficulties in Manufacturing armor plates fro the U.S. government. April 13, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Frick writes to Carnegie in Coworth Park, England and informs him that the "wage question at Homestead is almost serious one," and warns that it may be "necessary to fight it out this summer." April 21, 1892 Typescript Copy
 3. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidale, Berks, [England], Carnegie discusses his and Mr. Lauder's view on the manufacturing of armor plates for the government. Carnegie mentions in a short postscript receiving a cable from Frick concerning financial matters at Carnegie Brothers and Company and Carnegie, Phipps and Company. April 25, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Frick informs Carnegie of the price per share of the Frick Coke Company stock. April 29, 1892 Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie reports on the production of a competitors. May 2, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 6. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidale, Berks, [England], Carnegie, Mr. Phipps, Mr. Lauder comment on a statement received from Frick about financial losses at Carnegie, Phipps and Company. They also inquire about the Philadelphia Company situation, an arrangement with Newell and the new beam mill. Handwritten postscript indicates that Mr. Lauder will travel to St. Petersburg, [Russia].[Note: Four pages appear to be missing from the letter.] May 4, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidale, Berks, [England], Carnegie discusses and also advises Frick about the manufacturing of armor.[ Included with the letter is a newspaper clipping entitled, "Good Work on Armor Plating." May 9, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidale, Berks, [England], Carnegie comments on Frick's proposed budget from May 3, a detectives report and losses at Carnegie, Phipps and Company. Handwritten postscript indicates Carnegie will speak at a forum [in England]. May 13, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Writing from Coworth Park, Berks, [England], Carnegie comments on Fricks decision to put a "common price" on rails; councils him on how to handle competition in Chicago and points out several points of concern pertaining to the "re-organization papers." May 13, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, May 16-31, 1892 14
 1. A telegram from [Coworth Park], Sunnidale, [Berks, England] which states, "Why cannot term new company be twenty years instead only eight Harry objects wire Sunnidale." May 16, 1892 Telegram
 2. A telegram from [Coworth Park], Sunnidale, [Berks, England] which states, "Signed." May 17, 1892 Telegram
 3. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidale, Berks, [England], Carnegie announces that "Harry will sign the [re-organization papers] dealing with Keystone [Bridge Company.] May 18, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidale, Berks, [England], Carnegie comments on the situation at Homestead, Edgar Thomson "direct", steel tests for nickel and the amount of pig iron purchased in light of the possible shut down at Homestead. Handwritten postscript in which Carnegie acknowledges he and Mr. Phipps have not yet signed the "Iron Clad Agreement." May 23, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Typescript copy of the postscript only from Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick, May 23, 1892. May 23, 1892 Typescript Copy
 6. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidale, Berks, [England], Carnegie discusses a decline in business. Carnegie announces in handwritten postscript [William] Abbott has traveled to "the continent" and Mr. Lauder has gone to St. Petersburg, [Russia], while no word has been received from Mr. Leishman. May 24, 1892 Typed Lettter Signed
 7. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidale, Berks, [England], Carnegie comments on employees, iron mills and the iron clad agreement to be signed by Phipps, Abbott and himself. May 30, 1892 Typed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 8. A memo which states Carnegie promises to sign the "iron clad" in October 1892. undated Autographed Letter
 9. An extract of paragraph five from page two of Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick, May 30, 1892. In the paragraph Carnegie discusses the "Iron Clad Agreement." May 30, 1892 Typescript Copy
 10. Telegram from [Coworth Park], Sunnidale, [Berks, England], stating, "Ernst favorable Ironclad all sign upon our return." May 30, 1892 Telegram
 11. Frick informs Carnegie that he has enclosed a copy of [pay] scales to be presented to homestead [workers.] Copy of scales not present. May 31, 1892 Typescript Copy
 12. Frick discusses the details pertaining to "Iron Clad agreement." May 31, 1892 Typescript Copy
 13. Frick discusses the labor issues occurring Homestead. The enclosed copies of wage scales are not present. May 31, 1892 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, June 2-14, 1892 15
 1. Writing to Carnegie in England, Frick discusses internal business matters and addresses the "Iron clad agreement." June 2, 1892 Typescript Copy
 2. An extract from Henry Clay Frick to Andrew Carnegie, June 2, 1892. June 2, 1892 Typescript Copy
 3. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidale, Berks, [England], Carnegie says that he did not forget about the Orchestration and that he sent two photographs of the Orchestration to Frick discussing each. Enclosed photographs are not present. June 3, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidale, Berks, [England], Carnegie discusses updating the "present building" in appearance and letting the matter lie until he can assess the situation himself in Pittsburgh. June 3, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Frick discusses the "Considerable excitement" at the [Republican] convention at Minneapolis. This letter is an extract from a letter from Henry Clay Frick to Andrew Carnegie, June 7, 1892. June 7, 1892 Typescript Copy
 6. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidale, Berks, [England], Carnegie discusses the lack of production in their armor manufacturing and mentions the labor matter at Homestead, which he hopes, Frick will finally settle. Carnegie briefly discusses in a handwritten postscript some work Mr. Lauder is performing in St. Petersburg, [Russia]. June 7, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidale, Berks, [England], Carnegie discusses labor issues at Homestead, the production of armor and matters involving Mr. Lauder and Mr. Leishman. June 10, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 8. A note discussing Carnegie and Fricks reaction to Homestead strike. undated Autographed Letter
 9. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidadale, Berks, [England], Carnegie discusses says that Mr. Lauder has wired him from St. Petersburg about the up coming interview with the high admiral. Carnegie requests Frick wire him about why their is a need for a ten thousand ton press. June 14, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Mr. Childs indicates the need for a new press with a capacity of not less ten thousand tons, for forging large ingots down to suitable size for the production of armor. Attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry clay Frick, June 14, 1892. June 25, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Frick writes Carnegie in England and discusses the enclosed statement which indicates names of workers, occupations, days worked and total amount of wages earned during May, 1892 at the Homestead Steel Works. The enclosed state not present. June 14, 1892 Typescript Copy
 12. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidale, Berks, [England], Carnegie responds to Frick's letter of June 2nd and agrees with his assessment of the "Iron Clad Agreement" and the proposition of building of a new of building [in Pittsburgh]. June 14, 1892 Typescript Copy Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, June 16-23, 1892 16
 1. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidale, Berks, [England], Carnegie discusses a meeting with a Mr. [W.H.] White, Chief Naval Constructor, [British Admiralty] concerning the matter of manufacturing [armor] plates. June 16, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Writing from Whitehall, London, White comments on the report sent to him by Mr. Phipps on the trial test of the New York's side armor. He then proceeds to discuss the tests performed under his supervision. An illustration of armor testing is included with the letter. Attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick, June 16, 1892. June 18, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed
 3. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidale, Berks, [England], Carnegie discusses matters concerning Carnegie Brothers and Company and comments on the Homestead labor issue. Also, Carnegie indicates that he has order the Orchestrion for Frick. Attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick, June 16, 1892. June 17, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 4. The Musical Box and Orchestrion Company located in Geneva, Switzerland, inquire over the details pertaining to Carnegie's requested order. The signature on the letter is unidentified. Attached to Andrew Carnegie to Henry Clay Frick, June 16, 1892. June 20, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie comments on the Homestead labor issue, manufacturing of armor and announces he will travel to Scotland. [Written on the letter from George Baker and Company to Andrew Carnegie], June 20, 1892. undated 
 6. Frick informs Carnegie of developments in the Homestead labor issue, indicating that a strike is apparently imminent and that "we would be better make the fight and be through with it." June 20, 1892 Typescript Copy
 7. Writing from Coworth Park, Sunnidale, Berks, [England], Carnegie encloses a letter and "plate" from W.H. White, Chief Constructor, British Admiralty, advising Frick to send him the information he has requested. Carnegie addresses the testing of armor with Holitzer chrome steel projectiles in the typed written postscript. June 21, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Frick discusses developments in the Homestead labor matter and predicts "a pretty severe struggle." June 22, 1892 Typescript Copy
 9. Carnegie discusses the "Iron Clad Agreement" and "H.P. [Henry Phipps]; he also mentions working and his book. June 23, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, June 24-July 11, 1892 4831
 1. Frick writes on negotiations at Homestead and the current stalemate situation. He also details a few measures he is taking to continue productivity in spite of the standoff. June 24, 1892 Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes from Coworth Park, Sunningdale, Berk[shire, England] on the "Iron Clad" and how to get all requisite signatures for it. June 24, 1892 Typescript Copy
 3. Frick writes on negotiations at Homestead and the current situation for getting Mr. Phipps to sign the "Iron Clad." June 24, 1892 Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie writes from Coworth Park, Sunningdale, Berk[shire, England] on funding the library and that membership should be free. June 28, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes from Coworth Park, Sunningdale, Berk[shire, England] on researching heavy press methods for armor plating. He mentions Homestead and his belief that Frick is "on the right track." In a handwritten post-script, he invites Frick to come over to England. June 28, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes from Sunningdale, [England] to instruct Frick to proceed with the library. June 28, 1892 Telegram
 7. Frick writes on Carnegie's telegram on Schwab and Gayley. [Attached to June 28th Telegram] July 2, 1892 
 8. Carnegie writes from Pitlochy, [Scotland] to tell Frick to continue to stand firm. He says that would rather the plant be closed than employ any rioter, and that Frick has his full support. July 7, 1892 Telegram
 9. Carnegie writes from Calvine, [Scotland] to say that the Governor's intervention is okay but no compromise is acceptable. July 12, 1892 Telegram
 10. Frick recounts the violent clash at Homestead and presents his case for why he acted as he did. He also writes of the involvement of Mr. Potters and his loss of nerve at the critical moment. July 11, 1892 Typescript Copy
 11. Frick writes that the violence at Homestead was begun by the strikers. He also says he believed the introduction of guards might spark this, but that it would allow them to regain control more quickly. July 11, 1892 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, July 12-28, 1892 2
 1. Carnegie writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] on the violence at Homestead citing poor management from Potter. He then writes of the need to move on and reorganize without the strikers, according to Frick's judgment, and Schwab as the manager. July 12, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] his support of Frick despite a fabricated story printed in Paris and that it is no longer a wages issue but that he is willing, if necessary, to close Homestead. July 14, 1892 Typescript Copy Telegram
 3. Carnegie writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] to advise Frick to close Homestead to all but government work and use Schwab to reorganize labor. He counsels that proper reorganization will be a better long term plan than quickly reopening the works. July 14, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Frick writes to justify his actions at Homestead and cites the opinion of the military as proof that the strikers were in the wrong. July 14, 1892 Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] on production versus labor issues in response to Frick's letters of June 20th and 22nd. July 14, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] on rejecting the offer from Lake Erie Railroad to move ore to Homestead because it would disrupt relations with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. July 14, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Frick writes to assure Carnegie of his actions with labor and to express his desire to prosecute the rioter even if the system will take time to work it through. July 18, 1892 Typescript Copy
 8. Frick writes to inform Carnegie that Mr. W. H. Singer will be traveling to Paris and that he could stop in Scotland to give an in-person update of the situation in Pittsburgh. July 19, 1892 Typescript Copy
 9. Frick writes to request guards to be stationed at Homestead to protect the property and workers. He is clear that the men should not be armed unless a situation arises that would require such actions. July 25, 1892 Typescript Copy
 10. Carnegie writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] on his joy that Frick was still alive after the assassination attempt and asks that Frick be careful. Received July 25, 1892 Telegram Typescript Copy
 11. Carnegie congratulates Frick on his recovery and return to work but adds that he must take care of himself before anything else. Received August 6, 1892 Telegram
 12. Carnegie writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] that no compromise is possible and that the strikebreakers should remain at work at all costs. Received August 27, 1892 Telegram
 13. Carnegie writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] to ask Frick to decide on a proposition worthy of consideration from Amalgamated Association. July 28, 1892 Telegram Typescript Copy
 14. Carnegie writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] to say that the Amalgamated Association's proposition is probably not worthy of consideration. July 29, 1892 Telegram Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, August 17-September 3, 1892 3
 1. Frick writes on the possibility of growing closer to the men through the Homestead experience. August 17, 1892 Typescript Copy
 2. Frick writes his expectation that it will take another month before the company can resume its normal production. August 19, 1892 Typescript Copy
 3. Frick writes of his dealing with a representative of Mr. Reid over the possibility of negotiating with Amalgamated Association. August 23, 1892 Typescript Copy
 4. Frick writes to tell Carnegie that he should cable Mr. Reid and inform him that there is no chance of negotiating with Amalgamated Association. August 26, 1892 Typescript Copy
 5. [Carnegie] writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] to tell Frick that he wrote to Mr. Reid informing him that the strikebreakers at Homestead will not be dismissed. August 27, 1892 Typescript Copy
 6. [Carnegie] writes on the "Party" causing misery to thousands through their strike and lost places. Received August 27, 1892 Telegram
 7. Frick writes to say that Carnegie should have been more clear in telling Mr. Reid that there would be absolutely no negotiations with Amalgamated Association. August 27, 1892 Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie writes on a variety of issues such as light rails, ore, and the work and reputation of Frick, Leishman and the other employees. In a handwritten post-script, he adds his hope that the "break" in the strike will come. August 29, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes on Mr. Lynch, Gayley, and the Homestead management situation. [Post-assassination attempt] Autographed Letter Signed
 10. Carnegie writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] on his hope that Frick will not adopt a plan for exposition without additional letters. Received September 3, 1892 Telegram Typescript Copy
 11. Carnegie writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] to say he has convinced Knox, who should hasten his actions. Received September 22, 1892 Telegram
 12. Carnegie writes on his joy at the approaching end. Received September 29, 1892 Telegram
 13. Carnegie writes his travel plans and his anxiety over the health of Mrs. Frick and Miss Childs. Received September 30, 1892 Telegram
 14. Carnegie writes that patience will win the Homestead standoff. He then goes on to discuss essential qualities of the next manager, who has not been chosen. He closes by advising Frick on recreational retreats such as whist and trout fishing. Received September 3, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, September 6-26, 1892 4
 1. Carnegie writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] on the importance of selecting a new manager for Homestead. September 6, 1892 Telegram
 2. Carnegie writes on his position not to discharge any men in order to rehire a striker. He also discusses his feelings on treason charges being worked on by Mr. Knox. September 6, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie writes from Clarence, [Scotland] on how to proceed against the strikers through legal connections. He also says that he is contented to wait out the situation or even to buy off strike leaders. He lastly expresses his hope that it will end soon. September 7, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed
 4. Frick expresses his feeling that the Homestead strike and its resolution will allow them to fix problems at Homestead that have been going on for years. September 8, 1892 Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie writes about the power of patience in settling a strike and gives his support of Frick's actions. In a handwritten post-script he praises Frick for taking a break and assures him that the end will come. September 9, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] to advise Frick to put Schwab in at Homestead. He also requests that Frick tell him about his health. In a handwritten post-script, he says that it might be good to sell their stock in the Pennsylvania or the Baltimore and Ohio Railroads if things are bad. September 20, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Frick writes his confidence that with a little more patience the break will come. He then advises Carnegie to keep his distance so that there will be no sign of weakness to the strikers. September 10, 1892 Typescript Copy
 8. Dod gives his approval that Schwab is the man to fix Homestead once the strike is over. September 16, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes on the various management of other personnel troubles. He also writes on his vacation to Italy for the winter. September 30, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed
 10. Carnegie writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] to tell Frick to "buy east and any others." September 20, 1892 Telegram
 11. Carnegie writes on buying out Abbott, Schwab's work at Edgar Thomson, and Knox's charges and explanations for treason. In a handwritten post-script, he writes on Frick's dedication to work despite personal health problems. September 24, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Carnegie writes that he wrote his views on Pittsburgh. September 26, 1892 Telegram
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Correspondence, September 27-October 12, 1892 5
 1. Frick writes on information from Chris Magee regarding an impending break in the strike. Frick also affirms his goal to act in any way that will be most beneficial to the company. September 27, 1892 Typescript Copy
 2. Frick writes on his firm stance in refusing to negotiate with Amalgamated Association and to require workers to apply for jobs at Homestead on an individual basis. September 27, 1892 Typescript Copy
 3. Carnegie writes on the armor contracts and the need to have a greater amount to produce in order to be profitable. He also writes of his intention to study European labor laws to gain an edge in disputes. In a handwritten post-script, Carnegie writes his desire to hear of Mr. and Mrs. Frick's health as well as the health of Miss Childs. September 28, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie writes on his delight at Frick's updates as well as a brief description of Carnegie's plans. In a handwritten post-script, he writes that he will be in London for a few days. September 30, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes his feelings that the health of Frick, his wife, and Miss Childs is more valuable than all his business and asks Frick to continually update him on their progress. September 30, 1892 Typescript Copy
 6. Carnegie writes on Mr. Lynch not fitting with Carnegie Brothers and Company and about the candidates to run Homestead. [September, 1892] Typescript Copy
 7. Carnegie writes to instruct Frick to accept help from other partners, or at least be grateful for the offer. He also counsels on the good ideas that could come from having another there who would say more than "ditto," and tells Frick not to be so "sensitive" to suggestions from partners simply trying to help. Received October 9, 1892 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 8. Frick writes that his motive for liquidating stock to Carnegie in the Frick Coke Company is to get out of debt. October 10, 1892 Typescript Copy
 9. Frick writes his feelings on Carnegie's proposed trip to Italy and defends his decision to reject Mr. Lauder's help. October 11, 1892 Typescript Copy
 10. Frick writes to defend himself with regard to the "friendly advice" given by Carnegie about his actions. October 12, 1892 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, October 13-22, 1892 6
 1. Carnegie writes from London, [England] to instruct Frick on some ways to increase productivity at Braddock. October 13, 1892 Telegram
 2. Carnegie writes from London, [England] to say to concentrate on the plunge. October 13, 1892 Telegram
 3. Carnegie writes from London, [England] on the character of Mr. Morrison. October 13, 1892 Telegram
 4. Carnegie writes from London, [England] telling Frick not to risk creating a new office at the present time. October 13, 1892 Telegram
 5. Carnegie writes from London, [England] to tell Frick that no man can have other responsibilities when in charge of the plunge. October 14, 1892 Telegram
 6. Carnegie writes from London, [England] on his satisfaction with the Egypt situation. October 15, 1892 Telegram
 7. Carnegie writes from London, [England] to say that he will travel to Paris the next day. October 17, 1892 Telegram
 8. Carnegie writes from Paris, [France] about his satisfaction with Frick's actions. October 19, 1892 Telegram
 9. Carnegie writes on Frick's management decisions being solid. He also writes on the armor plating situation and tactics. October 20, 1892 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 10. Carnegie writes from Paris, [France] on Braddock and Egypt. October 21, 1892 Telegram
 11. Carnegie writes from Paris, [France] on his growing relief that Frick is handling the strike well. He goes on to say that Frick should not lessen his interest in Frick Coke Company and that he thinks Frick is holding rails at a fair price. October 21, 1892 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 12. Carnegie writes from Paris, [France] to ask if anything is new. October 22, 1892 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, October 28-November 14, 1892 7
 1. Carnegie writes from Clarens, [Switzerland] to say that Schwab will do well and that the strikers are showing desperation. He also writes on some technological endeavors he has observed in the mills in Europe. October 28, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes from Clarens, [Switzerland] on negotiating with the Navy to change armor specifications to be equally effective but more easily produced. October 31, 1892 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie writes from Clarens, [Switzerland] on the factories he has visited. October 31, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed
 4. Frick writes on discussions with politicians and donations to their campaigns. He then comments on his coke company and the firmness of the strikers. October 31, 1892 Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie writes from Clarens, [Switzerland] on his departure and light phosphor steel. November 1, 1892 Telegram
 6. Carnegie writes from Milan, [Italy] to give the hotel where he is staying: Vin Hotel Laville. November 8, 1892 Telegram
 7. Frick writes on election proceedings and the loss of Harrison but says it should not make much difference to the company's interests. November 9, 1892 Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie writes from Milan, [Italy] on giving increased interest in the company to various managers and removing blundering leaders like Mr. Potter. November 9, 1892 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes from Clarens, [Switzerland] on Frick's management decisions as well as ore prices and billets. Received November 12, 1892 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 10. Carnegie writes from Venice, [Italy]: "Xin." November 14, 1892 Telegram
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Correspondence, November 15-25, 1892 8
 1. Carnegie writes from Venice, [Italy] saying, "Good anything pony." November 15, 1892 Telegram
 2. Frick writes on his meeting with the Naval Secretary and on discussions regarding armor plating orders. He also notes problems at Illinois Steel Company. November 16, 1892 Typescript Copy
 3. Carnegie writes from Venice, [Italy] on business affairs as well as some of his vacation highlights. November 17, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie writes from Venice, [Italy] on his gladness that pony (the mill) is still cold (not running) and that there is no use starting up until the majority of men ask. November 17, 1892 Telegram
 5. "Victory" November 18, 1892 Typescript Copy
 6. Frick writes to declare victory over the strikers. [Attached to 'Victory' Typescript] November 21, 1892 
 7. Morgan declares the strike is over and that pony (the mill) has started full-handed. [Attached to 'Victory' Typescript] November 21, 1892 
 8. A declaration of production at Duquesne in billets. An additional handwritten note is included conveying information on the production of other works. [November 19, 1892] Typed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes from Firenze, [Italy] on his joy over the end of the strike and congratulates everyone. November 19, 1892 Telegram
 10. Carnegie writes from Firenze, [Italy] declaring that, "Life worth living again," because of the end of the strike. November 22, 1892 Telegram
 11. Carnegie writes from Florence, [Italy] on production prospects and management issues now that the strike has ended. In a handwritten post script, Carnegie writes on the Illinois Steel Company's situation and his vision for Homestead. November 20, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed
 12. Carnegie writes Florence, [Italy] stating his relief at the resolution of the Strike and discussing various business situations Autographed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, November 28-December 8, 1892 9
 1. Frick writes on the lesson taught to the employees and on his desire to never endure such a fight again. November 28, 1892 Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes from Rome, [Italy] on letting other companies experiment with new steel making techniques, increasing capitol, and management expectations in the mills. November 29, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 3. Carnegie writes from Rome, [Italy] to tell Frick the name of the hotel where he will be staying. November 29, 1892 Telegram
 4. Carnegie writes from Florence, [Italy] on Schwab's leadership, rail production estimates and fuel cost for heat. November 29, 1892 Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie writes to include partners in the strike to help take some of the aggression away from being directed solely at Frick. November 1892 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes from Rome, [Italy] on Bethlehem Steel Company's armor producing techniques versus the Carnegie method. He also writes on the money management of Curry and Dillon. December 1, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 7. Carnegie writes from Rome, [Italy] to say that triple, not double, ingots must be rolled for armor. December 1, 1892 Telegram Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie writes from Rome, [Italy] on the armor-making process, light rails, and the importance of prudent modesty to help the company's image; he comments that Europe is rabid over Homestead. December 2, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 9. Carnegie writes from Rome, [Italy] to ask about Dillan. December 4, 1892 Telegram
 10. Carnegie writes from Naples, [Italy] that advance payments should be made to alleviate Homestead worker's suffering and show heart. December 8, 1892 Telegram
 11. Carnegie writes from Naples, [Italy] on the output from Braddock versus Duquesne. He also advises Frick to forward some money to workers who are struggling with Homestead's temporary closure. December 8, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 12. Carnegie writes from Naples, [Italy] on Potter's recommendations for armor production and Carnegie's desires to have Edgar Thomson switch to steel rails. December 8, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, December 11, 1892-May 27, 1893 10
 1. Carnegie writes from Naples, [Italy] on Homestead and the ways to show the workmen that the company cares for them, which will improve the company's image. December 11, 1892 Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes from Amalfi, [Italy] on the potential need to purchase a press for armor and possibly gun forging. He also describes the beauty of the area. December 15, 1892 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 3. Carnegie writes from Naples, [Italy] on where he will be staying in Rome. December 16, 1892 Telegram
 4. Carnegie writes from Naples, [Italy] on Mr. Curry's reports, mill production, and Democrats changing laws. December 18, 1892 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes from Rome, [Italy] on the armor finishing process. December 20, 1892 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes from Rome, [Italy] to wish all a Merry Christmas. December 24, 1892 Telegram
 7. Carnegie writes from Rome, [Italy] on the Whitworth price. December 26, 1892 Telegram
 8. Carnegie writes from Rome, [Italy] on production at Edgar Thomson, the salary of Mr. Childs, and Frick's decision to lower rail prices. December 27, 1892 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes from Rome, [Italy] on the purchase of a press for armor. December 28, 1892 Telegram
 10. Carnegie writes from New York, NY on the property value of Keystone Works. February 4, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Carnegie writes from New York, NY on quality control of steel rails at Edgar Thomson. February 10, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Carnegie writes from New York, NY on collecting patent charges from the Illinois Steel Company and Maryland Steel Company. February 11, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 13. Carnegie writes from New York, NY on ore rates. February 16, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 14. Carnegie writes from New York, NY on the potential help found in Mr. Stevenson to Schwab and Leishman. In a handwritten post-script, Carnegie inquires about armor contracts. February 21, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 15. Carnegie writes from New York, NY on the progress of Schwab at Homestead and agrees to meet Frick in Bethlehem, Pa. on the 27th. In a handwritten post-script, Carnegie writes his delight that Frick and his wife are taking a holiday. February 22, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 16. Carnegie writes on his travels as well as building plans for the new office building. February 27, 1893 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, June 1-July 27, 1893 11
 1. Carnegie writes from New York on waste at Edgar Thomson and his measures to eliminate it. June 1, 1893 Typed Copy Signed
 2. Carnegie writes from Loch Lomond, [Scotland] on a loan to the Music Hall Company. June 6, 1893 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 3. Carnegie writes from London, [England] on his plans for the music hall. He then comments on the plate mill situation and the general bad situation of the time. June 17, 1893 Autographed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie writes from London on his plans for the music hall. He then comments on the plate mill situation and the general bad situation of the time. June 17, 1893 Typescript Copy
 5. Reno writes from Shelter Island Heights, Suffolk County, New York on the loan situation for continued construction and expansion of Carnegie's music hall. June 27, 1893 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes from Carlisle, [Scotland] to ask about matters in Pittsburgh. July 3, 1893 Telegram
 7. Carnegie writes from Knebworth, [Scotland] to say his documents are signed but will be unavoidably delayed. July 3, 1893 Telegram
 8. Carnegie writes from Sanquhar, [Scotland] on the United States government's silver/gold standard of money as well as blunders in ore purchasing by the company. July 5, 1893 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes from Ballachulish, [Scotland] on the Reno loan situation falling through. July 10, 1893 Telegram
 10. Carnegie writes from Cluny Castle, [Scotland] on management of the Keystone shops, the Reno loan situation, and armor production advancements. In a handwritten post-script, he asks about rail production and competition and then gives his strategy to get ahead of the competition. July 14, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Carnegie writes from Cluny Castle, [Scotland] on the "Harveyizing" process for armor plates, on the company being outsold by the Scranton and Pennsylvania Steel Companies, and on the gold standard. In a handwritten post-script, he writes on Erie Steel mills and the Illinois Steel Co.'s foray into West Virginia. July 17, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Carnegie writes from Kingussie, [Scotland] to ask if there is anything new. July 18, 1893 Telegram
 13. Carnegie writes from Laggan, [Scotland] to tell Frick to cut prices and undersell anyone. July 20, 1893 Telegram
 14. Carnegie writes from Laggan, [Scotland] to tell Frick to put materials into the pig iron flurry over the next four weeks. July 27, 1893 Telegram
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Correspondence, August 1-11, 1893 12
 1. Carnegie writes from Cluny Castle, [Scotland] on the prospects of selling bonds and on Frick's abilities as a financier. August 1, 1893 Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes from Laggan, [Scotland] to say that the Bank of Scotland believes every bond has been sold. He adds that he will sail soon. August 2, 1893 Telegram
 3. Carnegie writes from Laggan, [Scotland] to say that he has visited Edinburgh and proposed a loan request to the Bank of Scotland. August 5, 1893 Telegram
 4. Carnegie writes from Laggan, [Scotland] to advise Frick to meet a Mr. Smith in New York to discuss loans and Frick's shares and endorsements. August 7, 1893 Telegram
 5. Carnegie writes on the financial situation of the company in light of the silver versus gold bond issues. August 8, 1893 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes from Laggan, [Scotland] to say that the Navy advanced money and so can not be refused their orders. August 8, 1893 Telegram
 7. Carnegie writes from Laggan, [Scotland] that nothing is possible in Europe until Congress stops silver. August 9, 1893 Telegram
 8. Carnegie writes from Laggan, [Scotland] that he will meet to discuss bonds in London on the sixteenth or nineteenth. August 10, 1893 Telegram
 9. Carnegie writes from Laggan, [Scotland] "Tentonic Wednesday." August 10, 1893 Telegram
 10. Phipps writes on options to obtain loans from various English banks. August 11, 1893 Telegram
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Correspondence, August 12-September 19, 1893 13
 1. Carnegie writes from Knebworth-Station, [Scotland] to tell Frick to get collateral in order for English loans. August 12, 1893 Telegram
 2. Carnegie writes from Laggan, [Scotland] on arranging bonds through Mr. Smith. August 13, 1893 Telegram
 3. Carnegie writes from Laggan, [Scotland] to say that his sailing has been postponed a day. August 14, 1893 Telegram
 4. Carnegie writes from Laggan, [Scotland] to say that he can not make the steamer thereby delaying his return. August 16, 1893 Telegram
 5. Carnegie writes from Kingussie, [Scotland] on his steamer route and asks about the Ridge Smith loans. August 18, 1893 Telegram
 6. Carnegie writes from Laggan, [Scotland] to praise the company's financial situation. August 24, 1893 Telegram
 7. Carnegie writes from Southampton, [England] on the "Whitworth offers returning." August 26, 1893 Telegram
 8. Frick writes on wage reduction plans. He then berates Schwab for his extravagance and mismanagement at Homestead to gain popularity with the workers. August 7, 1893 Typescript Copy
 9. Carnegie writes on sales to undercut Scranton, the state of billets and ore, and the sale of rails to Boston railroad companies. September 6, 1893 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 10. Carnegie writes from Saratoga, [N.Y.] to ask if anything is new and to give his travel itinerary for his trip around New England. September 7, 1893 Telegram
 11. Carnegie writes from Burlington, [Vt.] to give his trip itinerary. September 11, 1893 Telegram
 12. Carnegie writes from Mt. Washington, [N.H.] to say that things are glorious where he is and that Frick's new was glorious as well. September 12, 1893 Telegram
 13. Carnegie writes from Crawford House, [N.H.] to give the hotel where he will be staying in Boston. September 14, 1893 Telegram
 14. Carnegie writes from Crawford House, [N.H.] to say he is thrilled with Frick's news and give his opinion on rail prices. September 13, 1893 Autographed Letter Signed
 15. Carnegie writes from Albany, [N.Y.] on rail orders and how to deal with Scranton's presence in the east as well as his travels through New England. September 19, 1893 Autographed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, October 3-30, 1893 14
 1. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on ways to undersell competitors to the east and west. October 3, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on dealing with the men at Edgar Thomson to make billets in order to keep the mill running over the winter. October 3, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on collecting on patents for their mixer from the Illinois Steel Company and the Pennsylvania Steel Company. October 3, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on keeping questions between partners in the company with no outside arbitration. October 4, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on what should be done in reducing wages. October 4, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on continuing to scoop orders to keep the mills running full. October 4, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on the wage charts of Mr. Lovejoy. October 12, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on the steps toward moving into business wars with Scranton and Chicago. October 16, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes on the mill situation at Homestead and on the wage and billet situation at Edgar Thomson. [October] 17, 1893 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 10. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to say that New York Central declined the company's offer. October 19, 1893 Telegram
 11. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on clearly defining reconstruction and improvement costs at Duquesne and on keeping Edgar Thomson workers going through the winter by making billets. October 19, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on the depression and that rails are not being sold as well as the need to collect on patents. October 19, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 13. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on his interactions with a Mr. Katte. October 21, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 14. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on the Pennsylvania Railroad Company when compared to the New York Central and on how the market will rebound once the silver issue is settled. October 21, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 15. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on purchasing companies, collecting on patents, and on the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. [Stamped] October 26, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 16. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on rail and billet possibilities at Edgar Thomson. October 27, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 17. Carnegie writes his delight on the Bethlehem situation and that he will be coming out [to Pittsburgh] for a few days. [Stamped] October 30, 1893 Autographed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, November 3-December 16, 1893 15
 1. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to discuss Maj. Bent's figures on rail costs. November 3, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to tell Frick that by making steel slightly differently, he can get the same quality product with less production costs. He adds that this will gain an advantage in the eastern markets. November 3, 1893 Telegram
 3. Frick writes from "Pittsburg" to say that the way to gain eastern influence is to produce steel to their specifications, rather than altering the process. November 3, 1893 Telegram
 4. Carnegie writes from New York, [NY.] on dealings with Scranton and Pennsylvania Steel Companies that will benefit his interests in the eastern markets. November 4, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on Bethlehem Steel Company's "blunders" resulting in the need to erect an armor plant as cheaply as possible. November 8, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to give tactics in receiving patent royalties from Illinois Steel Company and Pennsylvania Steel Company. In a handwritten letter, Carnegie writes on negotiating with Scranton. November 8, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to say that seeking patent royalties should be based only on the original contract. November 9, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on the earnings of men on an average run at Chicago for the previous year. Also included is a newspaper clipping on the Silver/Sherman Act. November 10, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on dividing up Maryland Steel Company and Pennsylvania Steel Company's orders between Carnegie, Scranton and Bethlehem. Also included is a newspaper clipping on Pennsylvania Steel Company's aborted reorganization plans. November 22, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on the company's financial situation, prices for pig iron, and the "Harveyizing" of all military contract nickel-steel. December 1, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to request production statements from November. December 9, 1893 Telegram
 12. Carnegie writes from Washington D.C. to say his interview was cordial. December 11, 1893 Telegram
 13. Carnegie writes from Washington D.C. to tell Frick that he awaits his arrival. December 12, 1893 Telegram
 14. Carnegie writes on the faulty armor charges and his plans to discreetly visit Washington D.C. to discuss the company's position. Undated Autographed Letter Signed
 15. Carnegie writes from Washington D.C. on explanations he was given and requests Schwab come to give a more detailed explanation. December 12, 1893 Telegram
 16. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to request an approval note of his be brought and to say a test will be obtained if they press for it. December 16, 1893 Telegram
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Correspondence, December 25-30, 1893 16
 1. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to wish his partners well after the recent differences. December 25, 1893 Telegram
 2. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] that he will write Pitcairn and he instructs Frick not to let anything be published. December 26, 1893 Telegram
 3. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on a letter to "R.P." [Robert Pitcairn] and his desire to give work to worthy men rather than die rich. December 26, 1893 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 4. Frick writes from Homewood, [Pa.] to ask Carnegie to reduce the interest on a loan he has given to Frick. December 28, 1893 Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on suppressing a letter that managed to get to the newspaper companies. December 28, 1893 Typescript Copy
 6. Carnegie telegrams to Frick from New York saying he's "quite pleased one thousand per working day" and wanting to act "so as to produce the highest contributions from others." December 28, 1893 Telegram
 7. Carnegie writes on the need to give money to Pittsburgh, Frick's loan and other financial agreements, and his apology for letting private information slip though blaming editors for distorting the truth. December 28, 1893 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on giving and taking note policies, the prospect of good orders, and meeting with Mr. Swank. December 30, 1893 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] that purchasing "Norrie" at the current agreement is good and safe. December 30, 1893 Telegram
 10. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to ask if Connelly is Frick's favorite Postmaster. December 30, 1893 Telegram
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Correspondence, January 1-February 18, 1894 4841
 1. Carnegie agrees to increase Frick's salary, however, he disagrees with Frick's request to reduce the interest on a loan. He discusses the interchange of stock and the consolidation of the Frick Coke Company and Carnegie Brothers and Company, declaring it not practicable. January 1, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes, "Good, Swank will wait over and see you with me." January, 1894 Telegram
 3. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses the purchase of Mr. Phipps interest as a partner. January 3, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Writing from New York, Carnegie informs Frick he is about to depart on a trip and requests him to wire "Algeria", "Sheppard" [Hotel], "Cairo" January 4, 1894 Telegram
 5. Carnegie discusses his concern about the position of Carnegie Steel Company nationally, stating, "Carnegie S Co has become the Malakoff of the industrial situation." Also, he discusses troubles involving the manufacturing of plate [armor]. January 4, 1894 Typescript Copy Autographed Leter Signed
 6. Carnegie discusses and also councils Frick on a financial situation involving loans and government payments to the company. January 4, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 7. Carnegie advises "don't try to negotiate with H.P. [Henry Phipps] for his interest because he won't negotiate," and also councils Frick on the need to have "sentiment, imagination and feeling", to make him "the supreme manager nature intended you." January 5, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie wishes a "Happy New Year to one and all" and mentions being aboard a ship. January, 1894 Telegram
 9. Writing from Cairo, [Egypt], [Carnegie] says, "Slumber Nile tomorrow address Cooks Cairo." January 22, 1894 Telegram
 10. Carnegie's secretary writes from New York, indicating that he has come across the enclosed letter on Mr. Carnegie's desk and felt he should forward it to Frick without haste. Enclosed letter not present. February 6, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed
 11. [Carnegie] writes, "Delighted good news well happy" February 12, 1894 Telegram
 12. Writing from [Egypt], Near Abydos, Carnegie discusses his satisfaction with the future of C.S. Co.[Carnegie Steel Company], and also discusses a tariff, income tax and duties, and the death of Mr. Scott. February 18, 1894 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, February 28-March 26, 1894 2
 1. Writing from Cairo, Egypt, Carnegie discusses financial figures received from Frick about Homestead and also discusses [George] Lauder and "Harry" [Mr. Phipps]. February 28, 1894 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 2. [Carnegie] writes from Cairo, [Egypt], "Sail Naples Thursday love [kin]." March 5, 1894 Telegram
 3. Writing from Cairo, [Egypt], Carnegie says, "the ghost of Homestead is not yet laid," believing the incident will be used against them by their enemies. Also, he discusses the purchase of two mummies for Pittsburgh museum. In his postscript, he mentions eastern managers meeting their prices and coke being at eighty-five cents. March 6, 1894 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 4. Writing from Sorrento, [Italy], Carnegie discusses Mr. Allen's patent for an incline heating furnace. March 14, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 5. Writing from Sorrento, [Italy], Carnegie instructs Frick to negotiate with Oliver mining because of the involvement of Rockefeller and Porter. March 16, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 6. Carnegie's postscript from Andrew Carnegie to [Henry Clay Frick], March 16, 1894 from Sorrento, [Italy]. Carnegie discusses the matter of Mr. Frew's salary. March 16, 1894 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 7. Writing from Sorrento, [Italy], Carnegie discusses the construction of [Carnegie Library in Oakland.] March 25, 1894 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 8. Writing from Sorrento, [Italy], Carnegie discusses his improving health and his stay in [Italy] along with business involving coke properties and ore. March, 1894 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Writing from Rome, [Italy], Carnegie discusses what should be done concerning the deceased Mr. Scott's business and his wife and family. March 26, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, April 2-27, 1894 3
 1. Writing from Cannes, [France], Carnegie addresses the point that the English government is in need of armor for building twenty new ships and believes it would be in their best interest to furnish them with the armor. April 2, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 2. Writing from Cannes, [France], Carnegie discusses his thoughts on general business matters involving competitors and prices. April 2, 1894 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 3. Writing from Cannes, [France], Carnegie discusses production and cost of products manufactured at their mills. April 3, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 4. Writing from Paris, [France], Carnegie discusses coke strikes, production costs at Duquesne mills and Mr. Scott's widow and children. April 4, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 5. White thanks Carnegie for his note and responds that [England] has no difficulty getting the armor they require for building their ships. April 4, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie reports the news from England was mistaken, they are not in need of "Harveyized" armor and believes Russia is their only chance to sell armor to. [Written on [W.H.] White to Andrew Carnegie, April 4, 1894.] undated 
 7. Carnegie comments on his uncertainty of Mr. Schwab's managerial skills at Homestead. An [excerpt] from a letter from April 10, 1894. April 10, 1894 Typescript Copy
 8. Writing from Buckhurst Park, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses the "Oliver Bargain," the consolidating of steel casting companies and sales during the month of March. April 18, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Writing from Buckhurst Park, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses Scranton competition, Mr. Schwab, and his time in England. Carnegie's secretary P. W. Finnegan signed his and Carnegie's name to the letter. April 21, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Writing from Buckhurst Park, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses business involving Russia, Cornwall ore, and furnaces at Duquesne. April 24, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Writing from Buckhurst Park, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses building furnaces at Duquesne works and gives consolation to Frick after hearing of another strike in the coke region. April 25, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Writing from Buckhurst Park, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses sending a Lieutenant Stone to Russia; discusses Frick's market reports and states his pleasure that Frick and Mrs. Frick along with Mrs. Childs will visit him in the summer. April 26, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 13. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, {England], Carnegie councils Frick on the decision to invest in the building of new blast furnaces. Carnegie, also addresses a matter involving negotiating with Russia to furnish them with [plate armor needed for building ships]. April 27, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, May 7-31, 1894 4
 1. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses various business matters. May 7, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses costs at the Homestead works. May 11, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses labor troubles occurring in coke the region. May 11, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses the operation of blast furnaces at Duquesne and a coke strike. In his postscript, Carnegie talks about furnaces at "E.T." [Edgar Thomson] and [D.G.] Kerr[Furnace Superintendent of the Edgar Thomson Furnaces.] May 16, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie indicates he and "the Squire" have reviewed the cost reports that Frick supplied them. May 18, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses the investigation at Homestead concerning armor manufacturing for the United States government. May 22, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie comments on a four dollar duty placed on pig iron. May 22, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Writing from Buckhurst, Wtihyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses results and costs of armor testing. May 22, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie addresses Frick about the request from the Swedish Church of Braddock, Pa for a church organ. Note on the letter states a copy of this letter was sent to Mrs. [R] J. Foburg, Braddock, Pa. May 22, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses costs at the Homestead works along with costs at their beam mills. May 23, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses a report about the testing of a "Harveyized plate" by the government. May 24, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 12. A telegram from Withyham, [England] reads "Wit possible [nestrie] sampsen anything new." May 28, 1894 Telegram
 13. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses the matter of "Harveyized" armor and results from its testing. May 31, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, June 2-July 16, 1894 5
 1. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses Frick and his family staying with him at Cluny Castle in the up coming summer. June 2, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses problems concerning the Harvey process for making armor. June 2, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses needing someone to represent them in St. Petersburg if new contracts and trials are to be made there for armor. June 4, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], [Frick] expresses his opinion of [Charles M.] Schwab to Carnegie. June 7, 1894 Typescript Copy
 5. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses Frick's upcoming visit to Cluny Castle with his family. June 14, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses "the armor mess" involving the U.S. government. June 18, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie comments on reports about armor testing and the alarm over the silver standard. June 25, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses issues involving the efforts to produce armor for the United States government. July 2, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Writing from Buckhurst, Withyham, Sussex, [England], Carnegie discusses how profits are being made from "slag." July 6, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 10. [Carnegie] writes to Frick stating, "Advise promptly announce possible decision merger or nothing never entertain anything temporary writing." July 16, 1894 Telegram
 11. Writing from Cluny Castle, Kingussie, [Scotland], Carnegie discusses his displeasure over Frick's negotiations with a Mr. Rainey. July 16, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Writing from Cluny Castle, Kingussie, [Scotland], Carnegie discusses proposed coke agreement of a temporary merger of Frick Coke Company with other coke interests. July 16, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, July 17-October 8, 1894 6
 1. Carnegie writes from Kingussie [Scotland] on Mr. Schwab's capability in constructing and operating works. [ALS below typed letter, AC to HCF, 1p.] SCN: Carnegie concerned about Frick's health. July 17, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes from Laggan [Scotland] on supporting Egypt because of their interests. July 23, 1894 Telegram
 3. Writing from Laggan [Scotland], Carnegie delighted that Frick said a highland welcome. July 26, 1894 Telegram
 4. Writing from Kingussie [Scotland], Carnegie asks for the preparation of a statement for all the spending of the first six months. He also refuses any improvement costs and wishes Leishman could go on vacation and visit him. [Report included below letter, 2p.] SCN: Memorandum of Principal Cash Disbursements excluding operation disbursements for first six months until June 30, 1894. August 13, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Writing from Kingussie [Scotland], Carnegie mentions Messrs Back & Manson and Agents in Britain as possible business for the company. He enjoyed Frick's visit to Cluny, and also thinks the committee's testing of their plates will be beneficial because they'll prove to be good. August 27, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Writing from Kingussie [Scotland], Carnegie upset about borrowing money, and he mentioned British interest in armor contracts and other possible European interests. August 31, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Writing from Kingussie [Scotland], Carnegie instructs Frick to halt all experiments and advises Frick against outside investments. Also, Carnegie is concerned about his businessmen including personal matters in business, and he instructs Frick to leave all investments outside Pittsburgh and the surrounding area. September 4, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Writing from Kingussie [Scotland], Carnegie advises Frick on how to handle plate testing by a congressional committee. September 7, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Frick defends criticisms of Mr. Gayley's management, and he includes a letter from Mr. Gayley to Carnegie. [Note: letter not included.] September 20, 1894 Typescript Copy
 10. Writing from Kingussie [Scotland], Carnegie mentions the growing market for armor in England and requests Hunsiker to help make European contracts. He also writes of the Scottish weather. September 21, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Writing from Kingussie [Scotland], Carnegie encouraged about need for armor by English shipbuilders. He includes a newspaper article [The Scotsman, "Japanese Naval construction on the war" 1 p.] about the construction of two ships in England for the Japanese. September 27, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Writing from Withyham [England], Carnegie instructs Frick to wire Lord Brassey an invitation to Pittsburgh to view armor. October 8, 1894 Telegram
 13. Carnegie writes from Withyham [England] on possible future armor contracts with Russia. [Included ALS below] Carnegie writes about Lord Brassey. October 8, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, October 9-19, 1894 7
 1. Carnegie writes from Withyham [England] on several business concerns: stocks on hand, rail arrangements, and next year's outlook. October 9, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Frick writes that Mr. Elkins requested $5,000 and was given $2,500 and that he can provide political assistance to them. October 11, 1894 Typescript Copy
 3. Carnegie writes from Withyham [England] on paying off debts and avoiding potential labor organizing. October 11, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie writes from Withyham [England] on buying forty percent of the Fox Solid Pressed Steel Company. October 12, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Response to Carnegie's letter from October 12, Frick advises Carnegie to invest in the Fox Solid Pressed Steel Company. [Attached Memo] SCN: A balance sheet on the proposition to invest in Fox Solid Pressed Steel Co. October 22, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Writing from Withyham [England], Carnegie thinks that Mr. Fox will help them obtain more armor contracts in Britain and Russia. [Included newspaper article] SCN: Article on Messrs Scott & Co. having ten contracts to build ships for Chinese companies. October 12, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes from Withyham [England] on the importance of moving Mr. Schwab closer to the Homestead Works, and on furnace labor. October 15, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Writing from Withyham [England], Carnegie instructs Frick to write Secretary Herbert for more armor contracts since Bethlehem had done so. Also, he told Frick what to include in the letter. October 15, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 9. [Attached to previous October 15, 1894 letter] Hunsiker relayed a request from the Secretary of the Navy to Frick, asking Frick to write him a letter stating when their army contracts would finish. October 9, 1894 
 10. Writing from Withyham [England], Carnegie thinks business with Mr. Fox is less inviting, and also mentions the current New York Stock Exchange. [ALS postscript, 1 p.] SCN: Carnegie comments on the weather and that he is going to Eastwell Park. October 16, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Writing from Withyham [England], Carnegie is disturbed by the management at Homestead and the sales department. He also quotes prices for ordered materials. October 19, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, October 22-December 8, 1894 8
 1. Carnegie writes from Withyham, [England] that the situation is mixed and advices that he and Frick should confer often. October 22, 1894 Telegram
 2. Carnegie writes from Withyham, [England] that he has sent letters to various government leaders. October 23, 1894 Telegram
 3. Carnegie writes on getting positive things in the press to counteract the fact that the company is reducing wages. October 23, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie writes on getting positive things in the press to counteract the fact that the company is reducing wages. October 23, 1894 Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y] to ask Frick to visit him in New York and to meet with Linderman as well. November 3, 1894 Telegram
 6. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to invite Frick to breakfast. November 3, 1894 Telegram
 7. Carnegie writes on maneuvers to get Russian Armor Contracts and still be able to meet the United States' government's orders. He also proposes going into gun forgings. "Sunday" Answered November 6, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed
 8. Carnegie writes on maneuvers to get Russian Armor Contracts and still be able to meet the United States' government's orders. He also proposes going into gun forgings. "Sunday" Answered November 6, 1894 Typescript Copy
 9. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to invite Frick to stay with him while he is at the conference in New York. November 6, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on his visit to Pittsburgh, the various armor contracts, and Carnegie's speculations for business during the coming winter. November 26, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on United States government contract reports, potential Russian armor contracts, and changes to run "Mixer" more efficiently. November 28, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to remind Frick to send bottles [wine perhaps] to various people as gifts. November 28, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 13. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on subscribing to the Canal Survey. In a handwritten post-script, he adds that railroad companies will have to change rates. November 29, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 14. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on dividing armor and gun forging contracts with Bethlehem Steel Company. He also writes on developing land adjacent to Homestead. November 30, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 15. Carnegie writes from New York, [NY] on Gayley's expected output figures for various furnaces. In a typed post-script, Carnegie adds his approval of Frick's manager Mr. Pontefract. December 8, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 16. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on merger possibilities with Ohio Steel Company. December 8, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 17. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on amending a resolution so that the company will not be fined for armor that passes the government's acceptance test. Also included is a newspaper article in which the writer calls for plate testing. December 8, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, December 14-18, 1894 9
 1. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to persuade Quay that a provision should be made to his amendment that would protect the company from fines so long as the armor produced meets the Navy's specifications. December 14, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes from New York, [NY] on armor work with Mr. Flint and how to work with or compete against Bethlehem Steel Company for government contracts. Also included is a typed letter to Mr. Flint explaining the situation with Bethlehem Steel Company. December 15, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on the armor testing amendment and proposed request that armor be required to meet only the specifications for acceptable armor as stated in the original contract. December 15, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on competition with Bethlehem Steel Company for government contracts. December 17, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to request Mr. Lamant's address. December 17, 1894 Telegram
 6. Carnegie writes on Flint's position with the company and on Bethlehem Steel Company's dealings in South America. December 17, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes on Flint's position with the company and on Bethlehem Steel Company's dealings in South America. December 17, 1894 Typescript Copy
 8. Frick writes his letter of resignation citing his desire to be free of business cares to enjoy life. December 17, 1894 Typescript Copy
 9. Frick writes to reprove Carnegie for the information that Carnegie divulged that allowed Bethlehem Steel Company to successfully bid for the Russian armor contracts. December 18, 1894 Typescript Copy
 10. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to refuse Frick's resignation. He then states his belief that Frick is "not well." December 18, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed
 11. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to refuse Frick's resignation. He then states his belief that Frick is "not well." December 18, 1894 Typescript Copy
 12. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to give a kinder response to Frick's resignation by urging Frick to wait and see how the partners would feel about his retirement. December 18, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed
 13. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to give a kinder response to Frick's resignation by urging Frick to wait and see how the partners would feel about his retirement. December 18, 1894 Typescript Copy
 14. Carnegie writes on pig iron freight rates as well as the mining situation in the central west and its advantages for Pittsburgh. December 18, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, December 19-31, 1894 10
 1. Frick writes on finding a stockholder selling some of Carnegie's shares in the Frick Coke Company. December 19, 1894 Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on the armor specifications and on how the charges against Carnegie Steel Company have changed, unjustly, over the course of the prosecution. December 19, 1894 Types Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] that he desires to take contracts from English shipbuilders. December 19, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] that he is not selling any of his shares in the Frick Coke Company. December 20, 1894 Typescript Copy
 5. Frick writes on his continuing intention to retire, though he concedes to stay on to train his successor. December 20, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes to outline his own retirement plan and how his stake in the company should be divided, with Frick as his successor. December 23, 1894 Typescript Copy
 7. Carnegie writes to ask what measures in Carnegie's retirement would suit Frick. He then writes on Rainey and attempts to explain his goals in dealing with him and his coke company. December 26, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed
 8. Carnegie writes to ask what measures in Carnegie's retirement would suit Frick. He then writes on Rainey and attempts to explain his goals in dealing with him and his coke company. December 26, 1894 Typescript Copy
 9. Frick writes again on his intention to retire, though he concedes to stay on until the company can arrange to buy him out. December 24, 1894 Typescript Copy
 10. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] that his connection to President Cleveland has responded well. December 24, 1894 Telegram
 11. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to say he will writes more fully on his "Cleveland man." December 24, 1894 Telegram
 12. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on competition in Egypt and that Frick did well in managing the new Homestead scale. December 26, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 13. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on his satisfaction in dealing with the Secretary in Washington D.C. December 28, 1894 Typed Letter Signed
 14. Frick writes on the maneuvers of Rainey and comments with disdain on Carnegie's proposition with Rainey. December 28, 1894 Typescript Copy
 15. Carnegie writes on his desire to act according to Frick's wishes. He also states, "am not much of a letter-writer." December 28, 1894 Typescript Copy
 16. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to say that Secretary Herbert will be writing the company. December 29, 1894 Telegram
 17. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to say that the Cleveland man is handling things. December 29, 1894 Telegram
 18. Frick writes to say that while he detests Carnegie's dealings with Rainey, he will not hinder the negotiations. December 30, 1894 Typescript Copy
 19. Carnegie writes from New York [N.Y.] to ask if Herbert's letter has arrived. He adds that he never said a word to anyone. December 31, 1894 Telegram
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Correspondence, January 1-28, 1895 11
 1. Frick writes to say that Carnegie needs to treat Frick's retirement in a rational businesslike way rather than as the decision of a "disordered man." January 1, 1895 Autographed Letter Signed
 2. Frick writes to say that Carnegie needs to treat Frick's retirement in a rational businesslike way rather than as the decision of a "disordered man." January 1, 1895 Typescript Copy
 3. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to send a copy of a letter from Rainey in which Rainey requests Frick's presence at his coming meeting with Carnegie. January 2, 1895 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to send a copy of his letter to the Secretary of the Navy in which he details the company's stance on treatment of nickel-steel. January 2, 1895 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes to attempt to explain statements he made about Frick's mental health. January 3, 1895 Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes of a planned meeting with President Cleveland with Frick also to be present. January 12, 1895 Telegram
 7. Frick writes on making a trip to New York City on Wednesday morning. January 14, 1895 Typescript Copy
 8. Frick writes on getting book value for coal land owned by Rainey. January 14, 1895 Typescript Copy
 9. Frick writes to request that Carnegie reply by first mail so that he can receive it by Sunday. January 16, 1895 Typescript Copy
 10. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to give his views on purchasing gold and silver. January 18, 1895 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Frick writes that he has received Carnegie's letters and addressed the issues contained in them. January 21, 1895 Typescript Copy
 12. Rainey writes on Carnegie speaking with Mr. Rainey's father about a business deal. Attached in a typed letter signed, dated January 28, 1895, in which Carnegie sends his condolences for the senior Rainey's poor health and then writes that he looks forward to concluding the lucrative business arrangement. January 26, 1895 Typed Letter Signed
 13. Carnegie writes of his continued inability to locate the agreement Frick had requested. January 28, 1895 Autographed Letter Signed
 14. Carnegie writes of his continued inability to locate the agreement Frick had requested. January 28, 1895 Typescript Copy
 15. Carnegie writes, "the enclosed explains itself." In a handwritten post-script, he comments that he believes he can purchase Rainey Coke Company for stock in Frick Coke Company. January 28, 1895 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, February 14-December 1895 12
 1. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to ask if Frick knows anything about President Cleveland's property negotiations. February 14, 1895 Telegram
 2. Frick writes that he has no news on President Cleveland. February 14, 1895 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 3. Frick writes on a chat he had with William T. Rainey over the suspect legality of the two companies' agreement. February 14, 1895 Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to urge Frick to go to Cleveland and meet with Rainey. February 15, 1895 Telegram
 5. Frick cables Carnegie to say that he will not go to Cleveland. He later cables that he will go. February 15, 1895 Telescript Copy [Telegram]
 6. In his journal, Frick records the various transfers of notes and stock between himself and Carnegie. February 20, 1895 Telescript Copy
 7. Frick writes on his trip to Europe, business prospects, and ore stockpiles in the Lake Region. July 13, 1895 Typescript
 8. Frick writes on negotiations to purchase property owned by McClure Coke Company. He also writes on negotiations with Mr. Painey and coke prices. October 11, 1895 Typescript Copy
 9. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on getting a car for the whole group of department heads on their trip. October 21, 1895 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Frick writes to advise Carnegie against relying on Rainey as it would weaken the position of the company with railroads. October 25, 1895 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Carnegie writes to Frick about meeting he had with Rainey regarding the management of Mc'Clure. October 25, 1895 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Frick writes of his meeting with Gates and Leishman over the breaking of the rail pool. October 26, 1895 Typescript Copy
 13. Frick writes on art being placed in the museum as well as tickets for the museum's opening. October 26, 1895 Typescript Copy
 14. Frick writes on passing papers with McClure dealing with the purchase of coal land from that company. October 29, 1895 Typescript Copy
 15. Carnegie writes that he stands behind Frick's business dealings. [December] 1895 Autographed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, January 4-April 27, 1896 13
 1. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on one of the furnaces, the Illinois Steel Company's reduction in price, and his upcoming visit to Pittsburgh. January 4, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Frick writes about the coke company's new profit for December 1895 and the year of 1895, also included its shipments for January. January 18, 1896 Typescript Copy
 3. Writing from New York [N.Y.], Carnegie thinks the coke business will be strong for 1896, and mentions Harry Oliver's option on a deposit. January 20, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Frick writes about the Connellsville District, business with the Illinois Steel Company, and of the property sold in the McClure Coke Company agreement. January 24, 1896 Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on Frick's interest in the South West Connellsville Coke property. January 25, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on the transportation of Connellsville coke by railroad. January 25, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Frick writes about the proposed extension of Col. Dick's road to Bessemer and of Mr. McCrea's disagreement with it. Also, Frick mentioned Judge Reed's thoughts on the matter. February 22, 1896 Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to ask when the meeting is. April 1, 1896 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 9. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] telling Frick he will see him next Wednesday and that he hopes to see him Friday. April 1, 1896 Telegram
 10. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] telling Frick that he will see him Wednesday. April 1, 1896 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 11. Frick writes from Philadelphia stating that the construction of the Dick Road is settled. April 26, 1896 Typescript Copy
 12. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] stating that it must be built, but other points can be arranged. April 27, 1896 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 13. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] telling Frick to drop siding matter and that Frick's ideas are sound. April 27, 1896 Telegram
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Correspondence, May 7-November 30, 1896 14
 1. Writing from New York [N.Y.], Carnegie states that he must be in Philadelphia next Monday, and he want Frick to come with him. May 7, 1896 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 2. Frick thinks it would be better if Carnegie went alone, but he would go if Carnegie thought he should. May 7, 1896 Telegram
 3. Carnegie writes from New York [N.Y.], apologizing that Frick will have to make another trip, but that he needs him. May 8, 1896 Telegram
 4. Response to Carnegie's telegram from May 8, Frick doesn't mind the trip, but he thinks it would better for Carnegie to visit with the parties another time, and Frick could advise him. May 8, 1896 Telegram
 5. Writing from New York [N.Y.], Carnegie tells Frick that it would be impossible to reschedule due to travel plans and that Mr. Thomson has already advised him and Frick shouldn't disturb. May 8, 1896 Telegram
 6. Carnegie writes from Kingussie [Scotland] on Mr. Thomson's business dealings, the ore under Frick coal, and Frick's vacation plans. June 27, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes from Kingussie [Scotland] on how he's disappointed to not see Frick in Scotland, on the silver craze, and how he will be glad that Frick will be in Pittsburgh. Carnegie also mentions his sailing adventures and cautions Frick about purchasing pictures. July 28, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Frick writes to Carnegie on the status of Homestead, Edgar Thompson, Duquesne Works, and Lucies since he has returned. Frick thinks that the coke business is currently dull, and mentions letters by Mr. Morse. September 7, 1896 Typescript Copy
 9. Carnegie writes from Kingussie [Scotland] on the progress of a road, Colonel Dick's stay with Carnegie, the presidential election of 1896, and consoles Frick on the Connellsville Coke business. September 18, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Frick writes that Mr. Westinghouse will be conducting business with Prince Hilkoff, a Russian minister of transportation and thinks Carnegie should arrive in Pittsburgh early to be apart of it. October 12, 1896 Typescript Copy
 11. Carnegie writes on the railroad campaign and thinks McKinley will win the presidential election. October 27, 1896 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 12. Frick writes to Carnegie on the proposed alliance with Mr. Rockefeller and on how to deal with Mr. Oliver. November 18, 1896 Typescript Copy
 13. Frick writes to Carnegie on their merger of two railroads and on his conversation with Mr. Thomson about it. November 27, 1896 Typescript Copy
 14. Frick writes on assuming the management of Norrie Mine and leasing half of it. November 30, 1896 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, December 4-31, 1896 15
 1. Carnegie writes from New York [N.Y.] and tells Frick that he doesn't object with the documents from Mr. Oliver. December 4, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes from New York [N.Y.] to ask Frick if he received the eye wash that was sent to Holland House. December 4, 1896 Telegram
 3. Writing from New York [N.Y.], Carnegie thinks that the Gold Clause in the Rockefeller lease should cover the rail rate. December 5, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie cordially greets Frick and wishes he could attend tonight's "concert by household," December 5, 1896 Telegram
 5. Frick writes on Mr. Oliver submitting papers on the Rockefeller business, and responds to Carnegie's December 5th letter by stating that the lease provides for royalty payments in the gold clause. December 9, 1896 Typescript Copy
 6. Frick writes to Carnegie on his conversation with Gates on South West stock, on creating a long term lease with Rockefeller, and on the royalty payments in the Rockefeller lease agreements. December 10, 1896 Typescript Copy
 7. Carnegie writes from New York [N.Y.] on their protection against the gold cause and that they should accept the proposition. He also mentions. Mr. Gates and troubles at Illinois Steel Co. December 11, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 8. [Attached to the December 11 letter] Writing from New York [N.Y.], Carnegie sends Frick a copy of a draft letter to Mr. Thomson that addressed Mr. Thomson's concerns on the railroad merger. [Autograph Letter Signed] Carnegie tells Frick that the part concerning Mr. Roberts was only a suggestion. December 10, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Frick writes to Carnegie on matters related to the stock of Pittsburgh, Shenango, and Lake Erie. December 28, 1896 Typescript Copy
 10. Writing from New York [N.Y.], Carnegie asks Frick why it is necessary to have a trust for the Bessemer Line stock, but thinks if it is, then it should be direct. [Postscript ALS] Carnegie tells Frick of some of Curry's thoughts on the railroad. December 30, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Writing from New York [N.Y.], Carnegie congratulates Frick on his new press agent and thinks that the important businessmen in the company should have their stock interests increased. December 30, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Frick thinks that forming a trust wouldn't be necessary if they had stock in hand and tells Carnegie to be careful in handing out interests. Frick also mentions the non-Bessemer ore market. December 31, 1896 Telescript Copy
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Correspondence, January 27-April 30, 1897 16
 1. Frick writes on him convincing Mr. Leishman into representing the company abroad instead of leaving. January 27, 1897 Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes from New York [N.Y.] telling Frick he'll await him there to discuss propositions for the government. January 30, 1897 Typescript Copy Telegram
 3. Frick writes to Carnegie on Mr. Scranton telling railmakers he's not bound to agreements this year. February 5, 1897 Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie writes from Greenwich [Conn.] on their business in Washington, Mr. Leishman's retirement, and the situation with Scranton. February 7, 1897 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 5. Frick writes to Carnegie on his conversation with Mr. Scranton and that Scranton withdrew from the association because of his board. February 8, 1897 Typescript Copy
 6. Carnegie writes from New York [N.Y.] on Mr. Knox going to Washington D.C. for their proposed amendment and on Pennsylvania Steel Co. reducing their wages. February 15, 1897 Typescript Copy
 7. Carnegie writes to Frick on the ore market. February 20, 1897 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie writes from New York [N.Y.] on the average price received for rails. February 25, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes from New York [N.Y.] on his visit with people from Norrie. February 26, 1897 Telegram
 10. Carnegie writes on shares for The Pittsburgh, Bessemer, and Lake Erie Railroad Company Stock. Also included are some calculations on the shares. February 27, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Carnegie writes from Greenwich [Conn.] on catching a cold, his trip to Harrisburg, and how he thinks Frick handled the ore situation well. March 1, 1897 Typescript Copy Telegram
 12. Carnegie writes from Greenwich [Conn.] on giving proxy votes to managers' substitutes. April 24, 1897 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 13. Frick writes about the proposed Washington amendment, Curry's ore purchase, his visit with George Gould and Mr. Dana, and how Frick would like to see Carnegie's new daughter. April 30, 1897 Typed Letter
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Correspondence, May 8-October 2, 1897 17
 1. Carnegie writes on Bessemer gold bonds and armor orders. May 8, 1897 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes on Bessemer gold bonds and armor orders. May 8, 1897 
 3. Carnegie writes from New York [N.Y.] on the Bessemer Line, stroke ore, and his visit with Mr. Whitney. May 31, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie writes from New York [N.Y.] on extending the Union railroad to the coke region and tells Frick to see Mr. Thomson about it. June 2, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Frick writes on his upcoming trip abroad, increased business, and on ore properties. July 6, 1897 Typescript Copy
 6. Frick writes on how to use the option in the Norrie stock to their advantage and on low monthly results. September 10, 1897 Typescript Copy
 7. Carnegie writes from Kingussie [Scotland] on Mr. Oliver's freight agreement and cautions Frick to act slowly in his arrangements with Scranton and Illinois Steel Companies. September 20, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Carnegie writes from Laggan [Scotland] on leasing their tilden option. September 20, 1897 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 9. Carnegie approves of Frick's actions and thinks H.W. Oliver needs to be watched. September 20, 1897 Typescript Copy [Telegram}
 10. Haskell writes to Frick on either his possible promotion in the South West [Connellsville Coke] Company or his leaving the company. [Included ALS, AC to HCF, 1p.] SCN: Carnegie thinks this man is able and Frick should take him. September 29, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Carnegie thinks Frick's opinion on the Iron Clad agreement is "off," and he goes on to mention the partners' interest. September 29, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Frick writes on the purchase of Norrie, keeping watch over Mr. Oliver, and new orders for Frick Coke Company. October 2, 1897 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, October 3-December 7, 1897 4851
 1. Carnegie writes from Cluny Castle, [Scotland] on the indispensability of Frick. In a handwritten post-script, Carnegie expresses his disinterest in Schwab's doings at Duquesne. October 3, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes from Cluny Castle, [Scotland] on receiving shares from Col. Dick, railroad shipment policies, company policy toward young partners, and his travel itinerary. October 9, 1897 Typescript Copy Typed Letter Signed
 3. Frick writes on taking business in guns and armor from Bethlehem Steel Company. October 22, 1897 Typescript Copy
 4. Frick writes on Mellon's desire to build a railroad to the coke region and on purchasing art for a museum/art gallery. October 27, 1897 Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie writes on the art Frick mentioned in his October 27, 1897 letter as well as his skepticism towards the proposed Mellon railroad line. November 10, 1897 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 6. Carnegie writes from Paris, [France] on details and possibilities to include in the "Iron Clad" to satisfy "H.P." [Phipps]. November 11, 1897 Autographed Letter Signed
 7. Frick writes Carnegie with the Earnings of the Frick Coke Company. November 16, 1897 Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie writes from Cannes, "Great have cabled strongly." November 19, 1897 Telegram
 9. Frick writes on the proposed Mellon railroad, the ironclad, and coal land acquisitions. November 22, 1897 Typescript Copy
 10. Carnegie writes from Cannes on Frick's Art exhibit and on increases to the younger partners. November 31, 1897 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 11. Frick writes on talks over the construction of Mellon's coal railroad line and on the wire rod and nail combination soon to go through. December 2, 1897 Typescript Copy
 12. Carnegie writes from Cannes on Mellon's proposed railroad and on prices and shipping rates to Chicago. December 4, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 13. Carnegie writes from Cannes on rail rates for finished products. December 7, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, January 3-February 8, 1898 2
 1. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on railroad rates, Mr. Odell's report and a lease for building a new railroad. January 3, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on keeping partners' interests increasing slowly and coke shipping rates. In a handwritten post-script, he comments on the health benefits of the Cannes climate. January 13, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Frick writes on railroad rates, wage increases to pacify workers, and the Illinois Steel Company's output for the previous month. January 17, 1898 Typescript Copy
 4. Frick writes on Mellon's proposed railroad and the Pennsylvania Railroad's reception of this idea as well as the Pennsylvania Railroad's dealing with Mr. Gates. January 20, 1898 Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on the interests of Schwab and Peacock within the company. January 28, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes from on board the "Columba" about Mellon's railroad, producing more pig iron, and coke rates. He also writes on the mixer patent payments and Schwab's proposed improvements. February 2, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on owning rail cars if any money was loaned to Bessemer Road. February 5, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] of his approval of Mellon's proposition, though he includes a necessary condition. February 5, 1898 Typescript Copy Telegram
 9. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on the company's superior position to the railroads and counsels Frick to own all he can in relation to the company's operations. February 5, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 10. Frick writes to update Carnegie on Mellon's railroad, production and the "Iron Clad." February 8, 1898 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, February 11-March 30, 1898 3
 1. Frick writes on relieving Mr. Archer as the orchestra director and the search for a new director. February 11, 1898 Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on coke prices, pig iron production, the recent Russian armor contract, and the management structure of Frick Coke Company. February 14, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on the poor financial situation of an un-named company in the contrast to his company. February 23, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Frick writes that he has purchased the Carrie Furnace Co. and will take possession of it May First. February 25, 1898 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 5. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on the Iron Clad and Harry Phipps. In numerous post-scripts, he writes the ideas of other partners on rail prices, extension lines and a gas line. February 26, 1898 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on Schwab's interest in the company. March 7, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on the purchase of Carrie Furnace Company, Frick's land in Connellsville, and the state of Frick Coke Company. He also comments on the orchestra situation. March 7, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on the extensive report on the Frick Coke Company he has received. In a handwritten post-script, he writes that Mrs. Frick would be better if she was at Skibo. March 18, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Frick writes on not selling coal to Illinois Steel Company, errors in the reports sent to Carnegie, and talks with the Pennsylvania Railroad. In a post-script, he comments on his daughter's business sense and wishes Carnegie joy with his daughter. March 19, 1898 Typescript Copy
 10. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on issues surrounding the Bessemer Road and the production potential if war erupts in Cuba. March 23, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on the Bessemer Road, Dick and Harry Cooper Bonds, the potential to take eastern markets, and the pending war in Cuba. March 29, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on the Bessemer Road and other railroad issues, which Frick is asked to handle personally. March 30, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, April 1-May 24, 1898 4
 1. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on the Bessemer Road, land for Frick's family, and the company's gains compared to other companies' losses. In a lengthy post-script he writes on Mrs. Frick's health and the virtues of Cannes. April 1, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on property holdings, the potential war with Spain, and competition with Illinois Steel Company. April 5, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Frick writes on management considerations for the Bessemer Road and a salary reduction for Odell. April 25, 1898 Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie writes from Cannes, [France] on the Conneaut Harbor situation and storing coke there. April 26, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes on optioning the Isabella Furnace Company. May 4, 1898 Telegram
 6. Frick writes on an offer from Gus Painter to buy the finishing mill, money made by Illinois Steel Co. in March, and the war with Spain. May 5, 1898 Typescript Copy
 7. Frick writes on the Isabella Furnaces and the potential to make good profits if it can be optioned. May 14, 1898 Typescript Copy
 8. Frick writes on the price of the Isabella Furnace Company and his plans for lowering the price through bonds. May 20, 1898 Typescript Copy
 9. Carnegie writes from London on the Illinois Steel Company, the consolidation of the Frick Coke Company with the Carnegie Steel Company, and the Bessemer Road situation. May 23, 1898 Autographed Letter Signed
 10. Frick writes on management positions, the Isabella furnaces not being purchased, buying land near Homestead and Frick's planned trip abroad for the year. May 24, 1898 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, June 10-December 27, 1898 5
 1. Frick writes on improving business prospects, consolidation rumors, and the company's current financial situation. He also comments on the company's security in the face of external consolidations. June 10, 1898 Typescript Copy
 2. Frick writes from Pittsburgh, [Pa.] on the invalidity of the current Iron Clad because it lacks Vandevort's signature. June 10, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie writes from Skibo, [Scotland] to suggest Frick expand his Chicago property. June 15, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie writes from Skibo, [Scotland] on ways to get pig iron to the Chicago markets more cheaply. June 20, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes from Skibo, [Scotland] on discussions for the Iron Clad. June 27, 1898 Typescript Copy Typed Letter Signed
 6. Frick writes on getting property near Forbes Street and Bellefield Street in present-day Oakland in Pittsburgh. October 27, 1898 Typescript Copy
 7. Frick writes on the standing of his coke company, the Oliver plant, and the property in Connellsville. November 10, 1898 Typescript Copy
 8. Frick writes on property suitable for a car shop, meetings with the Pennsylvania Railroad, and not permitting Federal Steel to make an arrangement with Mr. Rockefeller. December 5, 1898 Typescript Copy
 9. Frick writes on devising a plan to control the company's growing interests. December 10. 1898 Typescript Copy
 10. Frick writes on changing the company's organization in order to protect itself if a sale of the company was made, though he states that he is not in favor of selling the company. December 27, 1898 Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, December 30, 1898-April 24, 1899 6
 1. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on Pontefract's salary and the scarcity of ore, pig iron, and good coke. In a handwritten side note, Carnegie states that "H.P" [Harry Phipps] believes that capitol could be made. December 30, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on meeting with Frick either in New York or Pittsburgh. December 31, 1898 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 3. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on meeting with Frick and Quire. December 31, 1898 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie writes on prices and company debt. Undated Autographed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on his approval of a proposed agreement with Oliver. January 3, 1899 Telegram
 6. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] with instructions for Frick and his wife to escort the future Duke and Duchess of Devonshire during their trip to Pittsburgh. January 19, 1899 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes on car production, billets, and his will. He notes that he is not anxious to sell. Received January 24, 1899 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie writes on getting the company in a good financial state. January 26, 1899 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 9. Carnegie writes on finished products such as steel cars. He strongly expresses his views on an appropriate agreement with Schoen regarding steel cars. February 11, 1899 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 10. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to ask about Helen Frick. February 17, 1899 Telegram
 11. Carew writes on art that Carnegie might be interested in purchasing and provides descriptions of the works. February 27, 1899 Typescript Copy
 12. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to ask Frick and Phipps to take his money from the company's sale and move it into the Frick Companies. April 24, 1899 Autographed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, May 4-December 1899 7
 1. Carnegie writes from London, [England] to say that it does not matter to him how his option money has been deposited. May 4, 1899 Telegram
 2. Carnegie writes from London, [England] on restructuring the company interests among the partners. May 7, 1899 Telegram
 3. Carnegie writes from Dernoch, [England] to ask about cash instead of bonds. May 22, 1899 Telegram
 4. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to wish Frick "Happy returns." December 19, 1899 Telegram
 5. Carnegie writes of his travel plans and his desire to see Frick. August 20, 1899 Telegram
 6. Frick writes on merging Frick Coke Company and its allied companies with Carnegie Steel Company. November 18, 1899 Typescript Copy
 7. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to say that whatever was told Frick was blown out of proportion or an out and out lie. November 21, 1899 Telegram
 8. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] to explain that Frick acted hastily when he heard the remarks made by Carnegie and that the remarks were not meant to offend. November 21, 1899 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes to try and persuade Frick to agree to fixing coke prices at $1.35 USD per ton. December 1899 Autographed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, Undated 8
 1. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on stock increases. "November 21" Telegram
 2. Carnegie writes from Sorrento, [Italy] on using an incline to feed ingots into the furnace to save fuel. He also writes on rail construction tailoring to bridge spans needed by railroads. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie writes from Rome, [Italy] on tough times for steel companies and asks about Dillan's 400. Undated Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie writes of improvement costs at Edgar Thomson and mentions the end of Frick's Coke strike. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes on various topics regarding the business situation of Illinois Steel Company. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes on traveling to Boston and on purchasing coke properties. "Wednesday Eve" Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 7. Carnegie writes on stockholders' views of company purchases and borrowing money for cash payments. Undated Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie writes on rail quality control. He also mentions putting off merging Frick Coke Company with Carnegie Brothers and Company. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes on ore rates fro Oliver and his anger at Oliver's deception. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 10. Carnegie writes of a trip to Cornell as a trustee of the school. He adds his orders for Frick to run the mills at full. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 11. Carnegie writes on Potter's actions regarding ore and the need to handle the situation better. He also mentions approval votes by Senators Davis and Keyser. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, Undated 9
 1. Carnegie writes on using Frick Coke Company bonds to pay for monthly rail transportation on the Pennsylvania Rail Road. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes to advise Frick against business deals that might threaten railroad companies into producing their own rails. Undated Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 3. Carnegie writes to ask how Lucy's furnace "E" produces so well and what to do to get the other furnaces at Lucy to produce comparably. Undated Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie writes on meeting with the Board of Trustees to discuss a new building and he requests that someone look into acquiring land east of the institute. Undated Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 5. This is a copy of the minutes from a board meeting discussing the Union Iron Mills lease, the Bridge Company's proposed agreement, and the pig iron market. Carnegie adds a note to Frick on steel cars and labor. "En Route/7th" Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 6. Carnegie writes on staying out of trouble by letting rail companies battle each other over shipping percentages. In a handwritten post-script, he adds that a "right of way" should be obtained. Undated Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 7. Carnegie writes his notes on the minutes of a board meeting and asks for more information on sales figures and steel car contracts. "February 24" Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie writes on the company's financial structure in shares, stocks, and bonds. Undated Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 9. Carnegie writes to invite Frick to come up for a visit. Undated Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 10. Carnegie writes from Knebworth, [Scotland] to give his opinions on company by-laws and to advise Frick to keep a free hand for himself when it comes to appointing a successor. Undated Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, Undated 10
 1. Carnegie writes on rail prices, pig iron surpluses and refraining from blowing out any furnaces. Undated Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes on the McClure decision and prices for cars for Lackawanna and Bent. "Saturday" Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie writes on art and on Frick making deeper inquiries in order to get satisfactory results. "16" Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie writes on purchasing land at Munhall and Braddock. He also writes on billet production at Edgar Thomson. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes on the ore needs in Baltimore as well as the other obstacles of that location and how it will lead to the company gaining similar status to Illinois Steel Company on the ore question. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes on Frick's new coke record and general company profits. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes on the potential railroad for Pittsburgh and Western that could reach Braddock from Sharpsburg independently of the Baltimore and Ohio junction. "24" Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 8. Carnegie writes on company policy to reveal the truth and on the power of public opinion. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes on an agreement with the other steel companies, but he advises Frick not to give too much company information or estimates. He also gives general instructions to some of his plant managers. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 10. Carnegie writes below a corresponding newspaper article on rail demand with the building of new lines in the far west and the northwest, which are set to commence. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, Undated 11
 1. Carnegie writes on the financial troubles of Kneeland and his unfinished railroad. He goes on to discuss the railroad plans of the Pennsylvania and Western and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Companies. Undated Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes on business for Frick in Philadelphia and the importance of keeping those things secret for a while. "Saturday" Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 3. Carnegie writes that Edgar Thomson should produce billets. Carnegie goes on to write about the necessary steps to averting a fiscal crisis, including selling pig iron secretly to select "A1" buyers. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie writes from Paris on shipping rates. He mentions that the government is not interested in building or buying an armor plant. He also notes the recent opening of the Bessemer line. November 1, 1897 Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes on the financial troubles of Mr. Morse. In a handwritten post-script he mentions the opening of the library on September 23rd or 30th or any subsequent Saturday. "Tuesday" [March 1889] Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 6. Carnegie writes on ways to avoid loss of profit despite shutting down a mill for maintenance. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes on billet and rail prices as well as production at Edgar Thomson. Undated Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie writes from Cenoa, [Italy] to request a report on Whitworth and to give the name of the hotel where he is staying: Ischotta Hotel. "January 9" Telegram
 9. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] with figures on rails and pig iron. Post-marked January 4, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed
 10. "Coke 509.00, Stack 495.00" with other figures and calculations. Undated Telegram
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Correspondence, Undated 12
 1. Carnegie writes on shipping rates, Frick's areas of responsibility within the company, and on dealing with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. "Likely during 80's" Autographed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes on negotiating firmly with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. Undated Autographed Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie sends his card. Post-marked October 31, 1888 Autographed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, Undated 13
 1. Carnegie writes on a letter leaking out valuable information. [189?] Telegram
 2. Carnegie writes from Alger, [France] that he received nothing and that Frick should wire the steamer "Columbia." [189?] Telegram
 3. A description of land to be leased in Pittsburgh. Undated Autographed Letter Unsigned
 4. Abbott writes that no orders are coming and that prices are "drooping." In a handwritten post-script, Carnegie writes on the coming depression and advises Abbott not to buy anything. Undated Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie writes on being patient in lease negotiations. Undated Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 6. Figures on earnings and worth of Carnegie Brothers and Company and Carnegie Phipps and Company. Undated Autographed Copy Unsigned
 7. Carnegie writes to advise Frick to wait before arranging interests and asks if Frick is all right from his journey. "February 9" Telegram Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie writes on setting aside stock for future partners as well as the value of the companies in general. "27" Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 9. Carnegie writes on reverting to a goal dependency system. Undated Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 10. Carnegie writes to ask Frick to come for a meeting with Mr. Thomson and "Mr. R." Carnegie adds that afterwards he will return with Frick to Pittsburgh. "Friday 8" Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 11. Carnegie writes on ore shipping costs, the new gas line, and making Keystone a department of Carnegie, Phipps, and Company. Also included is a newspaper clipping which deals with Scranton Steel Company's absorption into Lackawanna Steel and Iron Company. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
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Correspondence, Undated 4861
 1. Carnegie writes on measures to keep good managers in the company. He also writes on making Keystone part of Carnegie, Phipps, and Company. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes on costs and the advantages of renting existing works over building new ones. Undated Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 3. Carnegie writes a response to Frick's scathing letter by saying that someone is lying about Carnegie insulting and bearing ill will towards Frick. "Tuesday 21" Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie writes about a trust from Cleveland, which desires to purchase Beaver Falls Works. "Saturday" Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes on ore from Norrie and other mines. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes on production and prices as well as waste. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes on steel markets and then on the advantages of the Frick Coke Company to ship its product. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 8. Carnegie writes on competition and the advantages of producing finished steel products from raw materials. "February 10" Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 9. Carnegie writes from New York, [N.Y.] on visiting Pittsburgh and on his improvements to Skibo Caste in Scotland. "Sunday" Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 10. Carnegie writes on negotiations for loans with the Bank of Scotland. "August 4" Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
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Correspondence, Undated 2
 1. Carnegie writes on developing rail lines to Frick's coke ovens. He also advises Frick to be bold in defending these rail lines to other railroad companies. "November 10" Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes on implementing safe financial measures at Eland. He goes on to detail a deal with Mr. Park and how best to proceed so as to gain advantages in the deal. "Sunday" Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie writes on troubles in shipping as well as the need to stock up on lime and coke for the winter. In a handwritten post-script, Carnegie evaluates the pig iron market. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie writes on rail sales to Oliver. He evaluates Abbott's performance at Beaver Falls Works [Pa.] and discusses a small increase in billet production at Edgar Thomson. He also mentions an injunction is needed on Linden over the presence of a "basic furnace." "16" Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie writes on purchasing Pennsylvania and Western stock to control the company. He also writes on increasing share holdings in other companies as well. Received October 18, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 6. Carnegie writes on fixing coke prices at $1.35 USD per ton as if it is a completed deal. He also belittles Frick. December 1899 Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
  Folder
Correspondence, Undated 3
 1. Carnegie writes on rail production, falling ore rates, and the pig iron market with current production. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed [Photocopy]
 2. Carnegie writes on postponing car contracts for a year to see how the market changes. Undated Typescript Copy
 3. Carnegie writes from Rome, [Italy] to instruct Frick to meet all prices of competitors. He also discusses potential Russian armor contracts. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie writes on laying off "recent tonnage men." He also declares his views on the need for total reorganization at Homestead. Undated Typescript Copy
 5. Carnegie writes on various business strategies in the event of Cleveland winning the Presidential Election. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes on strikebreaking tactics as well as the pig iron market. Undated Typescript Copy Autographed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes on over-employment at Homestead, ore rates and shipping, and on the landscape where he is traveling. Undated Typescript Copy
 8. Carnegie writes on investing in his own company over elsewhere. He writes on going to Rome, as well as labor costs, ore prices, and on distributing dividends appropriately to minor shareholders. Undated Typescript Copy
 9. Carnegie writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] on the ending of the Congressional Inquiry with the company's position well substantiated. Undated Typescript Copy
 10. Carnegie writes from Rannoch, [Scotland] on rejecting a proposition and says that he will be in the office on Monday. Also, on the same page is a copy of a telegram dated August 5, stating that Carnegie is at the office and feeling well. Undated Typescript Copy
 11. Carnegie writes his desire for Mrs. Frick, Miss Childs and the children to join him in Italy. He also mentions strikers wanting to follow Schwab's leadership. Undated Typescript
 12. Carnegie writes to advise Frick to be more open to help from the other partners during the crisis. He also adds tender condolences for the Frick's loss and for Miss Childs' health. [Fall 1892] Typescript Copy
 13. The letter describes Carnegie's failures in the Connellsville Coal endeavors. Undated Autographed Letter Signed
  Folder
Correspondence, Undated 4
 1. Carnegie writes of keeping a low profile to avoid reporters as he plans to meet with Kaiser Wilhelm. Undated Autographed Letter Signed
 2. Carnegie writes to discuss a public art museum and gallery. Undated Autographed Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie writes on campaign contributions to secure political/economic favors. Undated Typescript Copy
 4. Carnegie writes on nickel steel, more responsibility for Mr. Leishman, and the need for careful management in armor production affairs. Undated Autographed Letter Signed
 5. Carnegie writes on the armor business and its potential as well as commenting on the company's good general situation. Undated Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Carnegie writes on the price per ton in the government in the government armor contracts as well as the current poor business and market outlooks. "Thursday 29" Autographed Letter Signed
 7. Carnegie writes of his vacation activities and the contracts on armor. He discusses the "Harvey process" before closing with instructions on dealing with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company. Undated Autographed Letter Signed
 8. Carnegie writes from Cluny Castle, [Scotland] on Leishman and Dillan. He also writes on nickel steel. In a handwritten post-script, he notes a business deal he has made with a friend. "June 28" Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Carnegie writes on dealing with a shipping tax from a railroad company and on keeping cash available for market downturns that appear to be occurring. "Sunday" Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 10. Carnegie writes on shipping rates and dealing with various railroad companies. In a handwritten post-script, Carnegie writes his desire to produce on pig iron and steel. Undated Autographed Letter Signed
  Folder
Correspondence, Undated 5
 1. Carnegie writes on Mr. Childs as well as Mr. Carnegie's various social engagements. In a lengthy post-script, Carnegie writes on ore agreements with Illinois Steel Company and on refusing to enter into a steel trust with Scranton. "April 23" Autographed Letter Signed Typescript Copy
 2. Carnegie writes on railroad shipping rates. Undated Typed Letter Signed
 3. Carnegie writes on the finances of Carnegie Brothers and Company and Carnegie Phipps and Company. He then writes on billet and pig iron markets and shipping rates. "On Special Thursday" Autographed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie writes on the need to focus all attention on Homestead and getting it into good shape, even if it takes a long time before opening. He closes by requesting regular cables from Frick to keep him updated on any developments to the situation. Undated Autographed Letter Signed
 5. Frick writes on the company having a strong case against the Pennsylvania Railroad Company and asks how best to proceed. He also encloses a typed letter to Mr. Roberts, President of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, which deals with financial arrangements involving stocks that have violated agreements resulting in Carnegie's company losing money. Undated Autographed Letter Signed
  Folder
Correspondence (Miscellaneous Outgoing), February 10, 1890-July 17, 1912 6
 1. Frick writes to ask that his correspondence with Carnegie be examined for information on armor manufacturing. Undated Autographed Letter Signed
 2. Frick writes to announce that he closed for the Compound Armor Patent. February 10, 1890 Typescript Copy
 3. Frick writes to say that he will check the validity of the Lauth Patents. February 12, 1890 Typescript Copy
 4. Frick writes to say that Abbott will write to Carnegie on the armor plate. June 26, 1890 Typescript Copy
 5. Frick writes on Bethlehem Steel Company's armor production government contracts. July 3, 1890 Typescript Copy
 6. Frick writes on considering the Naval Secretary's contract and waiting until Carnegie's return to make a final decision. July 15, 1890 Typescript Copy
 7. Frick writes to say that the company will get more government contracts if it waits until October. July 17, 1890 Typescript Copy
 8. Frick writes that he would prefer that armor negotiations be deferred until Carnegie's October return. July 24, 1890 Typescript Copy
 9. Frick writes that Abbott will be able to oversee both the armor and the beam mills. April 14, 1891 Typescript Copy
 10. Frick writes to say that all will assist to quickly complete the construction of the armor mill. April 16, 1891 Typescript Copy
 11. Frick writes to express Lauder's views on rolling versus forging armor. April 22, 1891 Typescript Copy
 12. Frick writes to say that Abbott will write more fully on Secretary Folger's visit to the mill and his favorable impressions. June 22, 1891 Typescript Copy
 13. Frick writes on Secretary Folger's recent visit and Folger's satisfaction with armor progress. September 4, 1891 Typescript Copy
 14. Frick writes on improvements at Homestead under Abbott. September 7, 1891 Typescript Copy
 15. Frick writes on purchasing Sparrow's Point works and on working with other steel companies in order to get better deals from government. September 9, 1891 Typescript Copy
 16. Frick writes on the quality of steel requested for government armor and, if necessary, purchasing tools for the finishing process. September 15, 1891 Typescript Copy
 17. Frick writes on a reply sent to the government meant to protect the company's interests regarding nickel. September 21, 1891 Typescript Copy
 18. Frick writes to report successful armor tests. November 3, 1891 Typescript Copy
 19. The letter notes the enclosure of Knox's opinion on the armor contract. September 22, 1891 Typescript Copy
 20. "This opinion found in paper box file marked 'Armor,' which contains various reports, statements, etc." Undated Typescript Copy
 21. Frick writes on setting up a meeting with Mr. Linderman and Davenport at the New York offices as well as trying to get a man from the Carbon Iron Company. November 21, 1891 Typescript Copy
 22. Frick writes on hearing nothing from Secretary Tracy but that the contents of his last letter to the Secretary is fortunate in light of recent developments. November 27, 1891 Typescript Copy
 23. Frick writes that there is nothing new with armor and that Abbott should avoid the Secretary. December 1, 1891 Typescript Copy
 24. Frick writes on working with other steel companies to get the best deal possible on armor. December 4, 1891 Typescript Copy
 25. Frick writes on government armor demands in tonnage, December 9, 1891 Typescript Copy
 26. Frick writes that Abbott has the armor matter in good shape. December 12, 1891 Typescript Copy
 27. Frick writes on armor orders and plates accepted by Captain Couden. December 15, 1891 Typescript Copy
 28. Frick writes on Abbott meeting with Carnegie on a fixed price for nickel. December 21, 1891 Typescript Copy
 29. Frick writes on Abbott's trip to Washington and that the government wants armor for the ship Monteray as quickly as possible. December 29, 1891 Typescript Copy
 30. Frick writes that the completion of an armor contract can be postponed. He also gives general information on company progress. August 29, 1890 Typescript Copy
 31. Frick writes on the armor contract and on the armor mill being almost complete. July 15, 1891 Typescript Copy
 32. Frick writes on successful tests of plates. He adds that he is waiting on the test results for "Harveyized" plates before proceeding with production. August 21, 1891 Typescript Copy
 33. Frick writes on running full through November and the rolling of two "Harveyized" plates. September 28, 1891 Typescript Copy
 34. Frick writes his hope that Secretary Tracy concerns will be alleviated through Carnegie's interviews. December 26, 1891 Typescript Copy
 35. Frick writes to say that the armor question is settled and the coming year's business is promising. January 6, 1892 Typescript Copy
 36. Frick writes that Secretary Tracy should be invited to Homestead and that the company should endeavor to quickly answer his concerns so that armor production can continue. January 11, 1892 Typescript Copy
 37. Frick writes on armor production falling short for January as well as being unsure of where to send what has been produced. In a post-script, Frick outlines the steps that have been taken to find out where the armor should be sent. January 29, 1892 Typescript Copy
 38. Frick writes on oversights caused by attention to the armor situation as well as the expected armor production capacity. In a post-script, Frick suggests that more armor finishing tools be placed at Homestead. February 5, 1892 Typescript Copy
 39. The letter updates Frick on information regarding armor gathered at his request. January 10, 1911 Typescript Copy
 40. McElroy writes on the research results for armor. January 12, 1911 Typescript Copy
 41. This letter documents further finds of armor letters but concludes by saying that Frick has all he needs. January 13, 1911 Typescript Copy
 42. A listing of the letters sent to Frick, including subject, date and sender information. January 10, 1911 Typescript Copy
 43. Letter to Carnegie commissioned by Frick requesting a public retraction of alleged false statements he made involving Frick and Henry Phipps, Jr. before the Stanley Committee, which made an antitrust investigation of United States Steel. Frick is concerned that, given Carnegie's reputation as a philanthropist, his false statements will be deemed truthful forever as part of the public archives. Frick also states that he is willing to appeal to the Courts regarding Carnegie's perjury. July 17, 1912 Typescript Copy

Section: Letterpress Copybooks, 1894-1895, 1899 

Scope and Content Notes

The letterpress copybooks contain copies of outgoing correspondence from Henry Clay Frick. It should be noted that Letterpress Copybook No. 2 is housed at the Archives Service Center while the General Letterpress Books, Volumes 1-19, belong to the Henry Clay Frick Papers at the Archives of The Frick Collection in New York City. Both sets are digitized and presented together online in the finding aid. The number by each item refers to the page in the letterpress copybook where the letter can be found. The Archives Service Center has photocopies.

A letterpress copybook was made directly from the originals using a transfer process. A letter freshly written in special copying ink was placed on a dampened page while the rest of the pages were protected by oilcloths. The copybook was then closed and the mechanical press screwed down tightly. The pressure and moisture caused an impression of the letter to be retained on the underside of the tissue sheet. This impression could then be read through the top of the thin tissue paper.

The numbering beside each item below refers to the page number in the copybook where the letter can be found.

Related Material

Additional letterpress copybooks that contain outgoing correspondence from Henry Clay Frick to Andrew Carnegie can also be found in Series II. Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited, 1867-1894 and Series IV. Carnegie Steel Company, 1892-1900. Abstracts and digitized contents are available.

  BoxVolume
Letterpress Copybook No. 2, September 17, 1894-February 15, 1895 4871
 1. Frick writes on costume confess cloth and the third net after deductions. September 17, 1894 Typescript Copy
 2. Frick writes on bidding for an armor contract with the Russian government and on the arrival of the Russian's specifications so they can quote a price. September 19, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 4. Frick writes on his skepticism about moving the Fox Company to Pittsburgh and Mr. P's [Phipps] desire to have furnaces and rod mills at Duquesne. September 3, 1894 Typed Letter [Copy]
 6. Frick defends criticisms of Mr. Gayley's management. September 20, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 7. Frick encloses information and specifications made by Russia on their armor contract. [Note: information not included] September 21, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 8. Frick thinks they should begin construction on a blast furnace at Duquesne, tells Carnegie that [Patrick R.] Dillion is leaving the company, and enclosed Schwab's view of the Russian armor contract. [Note: letter not included] September 25, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 11. Frick writes on the necessity of cutting wages at Homestead for the coming year, and possibly at Beaver Falls [Pa.], too. September 28, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 13. Frick writes on his previous letter sent to Carnegie about the Russian armor contract [September 19th], on handling the matter discreetly, and on Hunsiker's visit to Carnegie on October 20th. October 1, 1894 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 14. Frick includes his Oct.1 telegram message, and he writes on Mellon involvement in the Russian contract. October 1, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 16. Frick gave Carnegie's coke question to Mr. Walker and was given a response. Frick will talk about the matter when Carnegie returns in November. October 1, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 18. Frick encloses Summary of Profit and Loss and Disposition of Earnings for past eight months. October 2, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 19. Frick thinks Mr. Gayley should be replaced as manager of Edgar Thomson because he isn't energetic enough. Mr. Gayley is willing to have an assistant. October 3, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 21. Frick thinks that Henry G. Morse, President of Edge Moor Bridge Company, would be valuable to the company, and could be used at [Keystone Bridge Company]. October 8, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 22. Frick wired Brassy. Mortwago here today. Slumber. [attached to previous correspondence]. October 8, 1894 
 23. Frick writes that he gave Mr. Elkins $2,500 because he could become a political asset. October 11, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 24. Frick writes that [Millard] Hunsiker visited today. October 13, 1894 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 24. Frick writes that they have not decided what their bid to the Russians should be [attached to previous correspondence]. October 15, 1894 
 25. This telegram is coded; Frick writes on materials. October 17, 1894 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 25. Frick writes on renewing their present rail agreement [attached to previous correspondence]. October 20, 1894 
 26. Writing from New York, [N.Y.], Frick writes that Stone advised Lieut. Meigs to go over with other parties, and that Frick cabled Hunsiker. October 26, 1894 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 26. Writing from New York, [N.Y.], Frick writes that meeting was harmonious, but outlook isn't bright [attached to previous correspondence]. October 26, 1894 
 28. Frick urged by Mr. Whitney and Mr. Smith to subscribe to the Committee of Seventy. November 2, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 29. Frick includes the October report on Homestead and Beaver Falls [Pa.] and is glad that Carnegie is not as anxious about pursuing the Fox [Company] matter. November 2, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 32. Frick encloses memorandum on Duquesne costs [not included] and writes on Mr. Gayley and his visit to the Carrie furnaces. November 6, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 34. Frick isn't as favorable on the purchase of Carrie furnaces, unless it's for a lower price. November 7, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 35. Frick thinks it would be absurd to show "that letter as to aim for mechanical perfection at the works". November 22, 1894 Typed Letter [Copy]
 35. Frick wires Hunsiker's telegram message to Carnegie, that a technical board is strongly recommending their bid [attached to previous correspondence]. November 24, 1894 
 36. Frick repeats his previous telegram message and reports on a fire at Beaver Falls [Pa.]. November 24, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 37. Frick encloses an article from Mr. Gayley on the advantages of mixers, and Frick thinks it would be desirable to have a new mixer at Edgar Thomson. November 26, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 38. Frick will recommend that Mr. Gayley receive new engines and writes about his interview with Pollok & Mauro. November 28, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 40. Frick includes a list of improvements needed to be made in the coming year at various works. November 30, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 42. Frick gave $1,000 to a canal survey and thinks Carnegie should contribute, too, so that they don't show bias towards railroads. December 1, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 43. Frick writes on Mr. Morse's proposition on girder rails, his upcoming trip to New York, and his meeting with Mr. Henry Wick, President of Ohio Steel Company. December 6, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 47. Frick writes on meeting with Carnegie about editorials in the New York Herald and World, and on the Quay amendment and plate testing. December 10, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 50. Frick encloses letters from Schwab on reducing wages at Homestead, and on board approval for Schwab's proposal. December 12, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 51. Frick writes an address to Carnegie. December 17, 1894 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 51. Frick had an interview with Senator Quay, and the Senator will try to have his amendment passed [attached to previous correspondence]. December 17, 1894 
 52. Gayley, Schwab, and Morrison write to Frick on their position that Edgar Thomson Works would be ideal to manufacture girder rails. December 15, 1894 Typed Letter [Copy]
 54. Frick writes on Mr. Linderman, the Bethlehem Iron Company, and the Russian armor contracts. December 18, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 55. Frick writes on leaving the company and for Carnegie to find his successor. December 17, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed [Copy]
 58. Frick writes on Frick Coke Company bonds. December 19, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 59. Frick encloses a letter from Mr. Knox to Carnegie, and advises him to have a conference with Mr. Knox on the armor plate matter. December 20, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 61. In letter enclosed by Frick, Knox states that Carnegie should not worry about errors in a congressional report because they will be changed, and it should not jeopardize future government contracts. December 20, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 64. Frick responds to Carnegie's December 18th letter, and Frick sees no reason to recall his retirement and will advise his successor. December 20, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed [Copy]
 66. Frick writes that wage reductions will not create any resistance and thinks that reductions should also be made at [Keystone Bridge Company]. December 20, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 68. Frick writes that the Secretary will see them tomorrow at 10:00. December 21, 1894 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 68. Frick tells Carnegie thanks [attached to previous correspondence]. December 21, 1894 
 69. Frick tells Carnegie that he received his letter. December 24, 1894 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 69. Frick writes [in his own hand] on his retirement and on Carnegie buying his interest [attached to previous correspondence]. December 24, 1894 
 70. Frick writes on committee hearings and Secretary Herbert's testimony. December 24, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 72. Frick writes on Mr. Rainey and his relation to the Frick Coke Company. December 28, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 74. Frick writes on meeting with Carnegie to discuss future arrangements [presumably his retirement]. December 28, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 75. Frick includes a letter from their Freight Agent, Mr. George R. McCagus, and writes on rail rates. December 28, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 76. McCagus to Frick who does a transportation comparison on manufacturing pig iron and shipping steel rails from Bessemer, Pa, Lorain, Ohio, and Youngstown, Ohio. December 27, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 81. Frick writes on Hunsiker's telegram about a possible Swedish contract, and on the company's relations with Bethlehem on this deal. December 28, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 83. Frick wires Carnegie telling him that Secretary [of the Navy] Herbert will wire Carnegie today. December 29, 1894 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 84. Frick writes that he is glad Carnegie did not talk to reporters and disagrees with him on writing Secretary [of the Navy Hilary Abner] Herbert. December 29, 1894 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 85. Frick seems upset that Carnegie has excluded him from negotiations with Mr. Rainey on matters related to Frick Coke Company. December 30, 1894 Typed Letter [Copy]
 86. Frick wires Carnegie telling him that hasn't received anything [attached to previous correspondence]. December 31, 1894 
 87. Frick wires Carnegie telling him he received a letter and that it refers to newspaper interviews, which he thinks should be avoided. January 1, 1895 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 88. Frick states that he enclosed the secretary's letter and a copy of Captain Sampson's letter. January 1, 1895 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 89. Frick tells Carnegie to stop writing "nonsensical talk" about him, includes examples, and asks Carnegie to buy his interest. January 1, 1895 Autographed Letter Signed [Copy]
 94. Frick writes on Board actions, sends a clipping from the Connellsville Courier, and writes on Mr. Rainey's January shipments. January 1, 1895 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 95. Frick writes that Mr. Curry wants to give over 1/2 of 1% to be out of debt to the Association and the Board approved it. Also, Frick talked with Mr. Leishman on increasing his interest. January 11, 1895 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 96. Frick thanks Carnegie for his invitation, but he won't be in Philadelphia until Wednesday. January 14, 1895 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 97. Frick writes on coal acreage and Frick Coke Company affairs. January 14, 1895 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 98. Frick asks Carnegie to return something by first mail so he can receive it Sunday and if Carnegie has been able to get his hands on the missing agreement. January 16, 1895 Autographed Letter Signed [Copy]
 99. Frick writes that Carnegie's letters have been received, and asks Carnegie to search for the missing agreement. January 21, 1895 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 100. Frick wires Carnegie telling him that he has heard no news about him. February 14, 1895 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
 101. Frick writes on his meeting with Mr. Rainey at the Duquesne Club. February 14, 1895 Typed Letter Signed [Copy]
 102. Frick wires Carnegie and tells him that he won't be going to Cleveland [attached to previous correspondence]. February 15, 1895 
 103. Frick wires Carnegie, telling him that he will go tonight. February 15, 1895 Typescript Copy [Telegram]
  Volume
Letterpress Copybook, May 1899-June 1899 2

This second volume mostly pertains to matters regarding a buyout option that Frick, Henry Phipps, and William H. Moore created for Carnegie; there are no abstracts provided. (More records pertaining to this topic can be found in the Carnegie Steel Company, Limited Series.)

Section: General Letterpress Books, 1881-1901 

Scope and Content Notes

The remaining correspondence in this subseries contains digitized images of the original letters by Frick and Carnegie held within the Henry Clay Frick Papers at the Archives of The Frick Collection in New York City. The material includes 19 volumes of letterpress copybooks. The Archives Service Center has photocopies (see Box 710).

Although this correspondence relates to business matters regarding the two men, they are included in the letterpress copybooks containing personal correspondence of Frick and, therefore, are not part of the collection housed at the Archives Service Center. The numbering beside each item below refers to the page number in the copybook where the letter can be found.

Note that the copybooks contain general correspondence between Frick and several individuals, but only the correspondence between Frick and Carnegie specifically was digitized and presented online in the finding aid.

Related Material

Additional letterpress copybooks that contain outgoing correspondence from Henry Clay Frick to Andrew Carnegie can also be found in Series II. Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited, 1867-1894 and Series IV. Carnegie Steel Company, 1892-1900. Abstracts and digitized contents are available.

  Volume
General Letterpress Book, March 12, 1881-January 26, 1885 1
 251. Frick writes Carnegie to enclose money entrusted to him by Ferguson for Pennsylvania Railroad bonds. March 8, 1883 Autographed Letter Signed
 303. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss the amount of ovens in the Connellsville region and to inform Carnegie he did August 13, 1883 Autographed Letter Signed
 330. Frick writes Carnegie to extend some advice as to what he should do regarding the Frick Coal Company. November 19, 1883 Autographed Letter Signed
 457. Frick writes Carnegie to extend some advice as to what he should do regarding the Frick Coal Company. December 16, 1884 Typed Letter Signed
  Volume
General Letterpress Book, January 28, 1885-September 23, 1886 2
 181. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him about his letter to mr. Morgan and Mr. Wilson. September 30, 1885 Autographed Letter Signed
 427. Frick dictates a letter to Carnegie regarding a Mr. Lockhart, who is a Pittsburgh architect. July 26, 1886 Typed Letter Signed
  Volume
General Letterpress Book, September 23, 1886-October 13, 1887 3
 15. Frick writes to Carnegie about a subscription for Mr. Bullitt and coke production, which is seeing a high output. September 30, 1886 Typed Letter Signed
 338. Frick writes to the Carnegie Company about a business proposition. June 7, 1887 Typed Letter Signed
  Volume
General Letterpress Book, October 15, 1887-June 12, 1889 4
 105. Frick writes that he sent Mr. [George] Shiras a copy of Mr. Morgan's letter to ask him his opinion on it. January 16, 1888 Autographed Letter Signed
 221. Frick writes of a settlement between him and the recipient of the letter. April 19, 1888 Autographed Letter Signed
 221. Frick writes to tell Carnegie about an endorement made by Mr. Walker. [attached to previous correspondence] April 20, 1888 
 225. Frick writes to enclose the figures for the amount of coke sold and moved. April 30, 1888 Autographed Letter Signed
 237. Writes that Mr. Frick is in Chicago [Ill.] and has repeated Carnegie's message to him. May 7, 1888 Autographed Letter Signed
 237. Mr. Carnegie has wired Frick. [attached to previous correspondence] May 7, 1888 
 274. Frick writes Carnegie to explain the unfolding of a deal Mr. Thomson facilitated with Mr. Jones. July 26, 1888 Autographed Letter Signed
 283. Frick writes to Carnegie about his plan to stabilize the price of ore. August 2, 1888 Typed Letter Signed
 283. Frick scribbles a note to Carnegie updated him on the status of the price stabilization, which was a success. [attached to previous correspondence] August 2, 1888 
 293. Frick writes to Carnegie to tell him Mr. Thomson has sailed and he has a meeting this week with Roberts. August 7, 1888 Typed Letter Signed
 293. An individual writes to Frick to tell him that Union bought coke, update him on Lynch's condition, inform him all is well at the residence, and that the Phildelphia party has not sent word yet. [attached to previous correspondence] August 8, 1888 
 302. Frick writes that his brother has cancelled all of his engagements for the week due to an illness. August 13, 1888 Autographed Letter Signed
 302. Frick writes on Roberts being sick and settling with his brothers and sisters for their interest in his mother's estate. [attached to previous correspondence] August 14, 1888 
 338. Frick writes to Carnegie to ask him what information he has received from Mr. Roberts. November 10, 1888 Typed Letter Signed
 339. Frick informs Carnegie that he has forwarded a telegram anonymously for Carnegie. November 14, 1888 Telegram
 350. Frick wires Carnegie to tell him there is no update from the Philsdelphia group; he has asked again for a response. December 10, 1888 Telegram
 369. Frick updates Carnegie on the status of multiple people's whereabouts. January 14, 1889 Telegram
 373. Frick Writes Carnegie to tell him the South Penn Reorganization Papers have been signed. January 14, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 392. Frick wires Carnegie to tell him Walker drew for Phipps money yesterday. Ferbuary 2, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 387. Frick wires Carnegie to inform him Mr. Chalfant has been informed and is satisfied. January 31, 1889 Telegram
 499. Frick write to Carnegie alluding to developments in the Basic matter and asking what he wants to do about the selling of rails to the Pennsylvania Railroad. February 18, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 496. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss the agreement that took place between Mr. Townsend and Mr. Roberts regarding the price of rails. He also mentions holding off on South Penn and updates Carnegie regarding the Chicago group. February 22, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 491. Frick writes Carnegie about an agreement regarding a right-of-way and the McKinney land. February 23, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 494 Frick writes to Carnegie that Mr. Chipley feels iron prices are too high and seeks to lower them and that pig metal interest is indeed on the rise. February 23, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 489. Frick updates Carnegie on a P. R. R. (Pennsylvania Railroad) question, notes that there has been a 'spurt' of higher requests for pig iron, and asks for him to give his opinion on a prospective location for a new building in downtown Pittsburgh. February 27, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 487. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him that Mr. MacLeod wanted rails and that Mr. Parke needs Carnegie to perform a favor for him which he will soon receive a letter about. March 7, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 415. Frick tells Carnegie to be harsher with Moore and be on the lookout for Schoonmaker, who is attempting to make a deal with a group in Chicago that Carnegie and Frick are interested in. March 13, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 422. Frick wires Carnegie that he needs to consult him on an urgent coke matter. March 20, 1888 Telegram
 424. Frick writes Carnegie that he can get nothing off. March 22, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 433. Frick wires Carnegie that he did not come home this morning but expects to close. March 28, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 434. Frick writes to Carnegie that all papers have been executed and delivered. March 29, 1889 Telegram
 457. Frick writes to inform Carnegie that he has settles with the Callorys'. April 30, 1889 Telegram
 467. Frick writes to ask Carnegie for a copy of his Leisenring letter. May 13, 1889 Telegram
 470. Frick writes Carnegie to give him pointers on a written item, asking him to strike a particular sentence. May 14, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 394. Frick writes Carnegie to offer comments on a letter drafted by Carnegie to Mr. Roberts. Undated Autographed Letter Signed
  Volume
General Letterpress Book, June 12, 1889-September 2, 1890 5
 5. Frick writes on the discrepancy in ore rates, the demand for rails, the closing on Pittsburgh & Western agreements, Mr. Moore's forced resignation, and the conditions at Allegheny Bessemer. June 13, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 500 Frick writes Carnegie to mention the progress on a furnace, update him on the status of the competitors, and to express enjoyment at learning the steel trade, which he feels can be produced more efficiently. July 25, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 499. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him Penn has given out contracts for 5,000 cars and to inform him about a visit to prospective property. July 27, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 69. Frick writes on a coke strike [Schoonmaker, McClure, and South West Coal & Coke Co.] and the settlement terms. August 9, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 78. Frick wires Carnegie on an editor being anxious to sell Eland. August 20, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 84 Frick writes to inform Carnegie of the actions of the McClure party and business matter. August 30, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 92. Frick wires Carnegie to ask for the address of a letter. September 5, 1889 Telegram
 493. Frick writes Carnegie about a conversation he had with Mr. Newell regarding the cost of rails for next year. Mr. Newell stated that Carnegie told him rails had been ordered for next year and Frick feels he was misquoted seeing as the information Mr. Newell states he heard is untrue. September 5, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 120. Frick write to inform Carnegie about business matters and a Captain, who has suffered a concussion. September 28, 1889 Telegram
 139. Frick informs Carnegie that there have been fifty-nine hundred tons of rails this week. October 12. 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 145. Frick writes Carnegie about busines mattes pertaining to acquisitions, stocks, and employees. October 21, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 171. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him about Sith's pig to rails cost and update him on a discussion Frick had with Park about acquisition of Park's company. November 15, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 174. Frick writes Carnegie that Park visited him and that rail production is high. November 16, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 175. Frick writes Carnegie to relay a telegraph message abour the price of properties. November 16, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 175. Frick telegraphs Carnegie to inform him he has arrived. [attached to previous correspondence] November 20, 1889 
 179. Frick writes Carnegie to update him on cenversations he has had with business associates, update him on the rising price of materials, and to mention that they should send Hurst to Chili and someone else to England. November 21, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 199. Frick writes Carnegie to tell him he has had a letter from Mr. Morse and was informed that Carnegie wrote to Mr. Potter. December 4, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 201. Frick telegraphs Carnegie to tell hm all is well and there will be ten payments a year. December 6, 1889 Telegram
 202. Frick writes Carnegie to restate his telegraph from earlier and indicate that he would like to buy the coke property and let it sit. December 6, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 203. Frick writes Carnegie about an enclosed copy of most of the 1890 rail delivery statements. He also discusses production levels and tarvel plans. December 7, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 206. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him that he has received his telegramand to discuss two possible acquisitions. December 9, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 210. Frick wires Carnegie to inform him that the Norrie matter was a failure. December 11, 1889 Telegram
 217. Frick wires Carnegie to inform him that the Gazette will publish the speech in full tomorrow. December 16, 1889. Telegram
 221. Frick writes Carnegie to update him on matters of business, adding a handwritten post script updating him on the price of rails. December 17, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 227. Frick writes Carnegie to tell him they should be able to start using 'G', a steel works, soon and to tell him Mr. Peacock has been hired as assistant purchasing agent and Mr. Clemson is settling in as superintendent of the mining department. December 21, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 232. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss prices and competition, particularly the Coke Company of Connellsville. December 26, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 241. Frick writes Carnegie to tell him they have divided up the money relating to Lauder as Carnegie recommended and informs Carnegie that they have purchased good property, but the proposed location for the ovens is bad. Dcember 28, 1889 Typed Letter Signed
 243. Frick wires Carnegie to tell him he started up in good shape at Edgar Thompsons. December 30, 1889 Telegram
 248. Frick wires Carnegie to extend sympathies that he is indisposed and tells him all is well at Bessemer. January 2, 1890 Telegram
 250. Frick writes Carnegie to express his happiness at Carnegie regaining health and informs him that their meetings have been pushed back and the 'G' furnace will be ready to begin firing in February. January 2, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 260. Frick writes Carnegie to say he hopes he gets better soon and when he knows what train he is coming on to notify him. January 6, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 261. Frick wires Carnegie telling him a plant ran out of gas and there were twelve hundred and eight tons yesterday. [attached to previous correspondence] January 9, 1890 
 262. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss railroad rates and to inform him that Carnegie had the gas shut off to the Philadelphia Company in Mckeesport at one and by two Allegheny Bessemer had closed. January 9, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 265. Frick writes Carnegie on the status of multiple business matters indicating that Carnegie asking for a survey was unwise seeing as affiliated parties now know who is interested in the property. January 13, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 289. Frick wires Carnegie that a satisfactory agreement was made last night. February 7, 1890 Telegram
 293. Frick writes Carnegie to update him on the financial situation of the Frick Coke Company, the Carnegie Phipps & Company, and the Carnegie Brothers & Company. February 10, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed
 296. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss a loss on investment and the current figures on cars shipped. February 12, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 300. Frick writes Carnegie to update him on future business ventures. February 13, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 302. Frick writes on accepting a rail order from McCracken & Semple, the current weak market, and on his visit to Bessemer. February 17, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 309. Frick writes Carnegie to tell him the pipe furninshing company is wiling to cancel the order. February 24, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 311. Frick wires Carnegie to tell him the furnace was lit. February 28, 1890 Telegram
 312. Frick writes Carnegie to tell him things are going well at Bessemer and that Mr. Miller and Mr. Scott have found th perfect property for a library in the east end. February 28, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 314. Frick encloses a note for his own order. March 1, 1890 Telegram
 321. Frick writes Carnegie to tell him he will not be seeing him this week and that the railroad east is having problems accomodating their loads which may mean a new outlet is needed. March 5, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 322. Frick writes Carnegie about a property that may be worth buying just south of Homestead. March 6, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 325. Frick writes carnegie about the status of machinery in both their facilities and Illinois Steek Company facilities in Chicago. March 19, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 330. Frick wires Carnegie to inform him he will be in New York on Wednesday and wants to know if he can expect Carnegie. March 22, 1890 Telegram
 341. Frick writes Carnegie about a business deal that depends on the placement of the B & O railroad, he also encloses a short update about the business. April 1, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 349. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him about productivity within the company. April 3, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 350. Frick writes Carnegie to update him as to the status of their furnaces and coke production as well as to notify Carnegie of a prospective gas property. April 4, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 363. Frick writes Carnegie to notify him where he will be staying over the next few days. April 24, 1890 Telegram
 377. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him of a resignation and business affairs. May 14, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 385. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him of a deal he discussed with Mr. Thompson and notify him that a key member of the administration was ill with headaches and would be taking a vacation. May 27, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 391. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss pig iron, rails, and the progress of the gas line. June 4, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed
 396. Frick writes Carnegie about the status of the mills and the progress of the gas line, noting that he does not think he will be able to go abroad this year. June 12, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 406. Frick writes Carnegie to tell him they are having difficulty pleasing their customers and are having to turn away rail orders because they can't deliver them. He also mentions that May's statement was disappointing and that the Penn & Westmoreland miners are on strike. June 26, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 427. Frick writes Carnegie to update him on business, such as them taking on a government contract Bethlehem cannot fulfill, having a shortage of cars, and the resignation of the president of the Keystone Bridge Company. July 3, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 435. Frick writes Carnegie to disclose what he saw on a trip to visit multiple mines, none of which he was overly impressed with. Frick does state that the future price of ore looks favorable. July 15, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 446. Frick writes on rail orders and Frick Coke Co.'s June results. Also, Frick advises against making a contract with the government on a small armor order. July 17, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 451. Frick reports on the following coke companies: Pittsburgh & Western, Semple & McCracken, and Frick Coke Co. July 24, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 456. Frick writes Carnegie about 'old reliable' and mentions he will have Mr. Childs submit a written statement. July 25, 1890 Autographed Letter Signed
 457. Frick writes to Carnegie to inform him of a bid that he had placed on a property that he felt should have been sufficient, but appears to have been outbid; he feels he was deceived by a the Boss. July 28, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 462. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him here has been no news on the farm bid and that he does not think they should ship any more rails to the Pittsburgh and Western Company unless they are compensated in something other than stock. July 29, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 471. Frick writes Carnegie a description of a trip he had to visit the Allegheny bessemer plant, which was not impressive, and the current status of the company mines, gas line, and prospective land. August 19, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
  Volume
General Letterpress Book, September 2, 1890-July 21, 1891 6
 4. Frick writes on the the excellent demands, the status on the furnaces, the completion of the gas line to Amity [Homestead], coke business, and not having received the deed for the Poor Farm yet. September 9, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 41. Frick wires Carnegie that he received Carnegie's telegram and that the points addressed will be watched. October 30, 1890 Telegram
 44. Frick writes on his meeting with Park and [Philander] Knox about their differences on an agreement. October 30, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 46. Frick writes on [Philander] Knox finishing the agreement and Park's satisfaction with it, but Park will still be sending it to his lawyer, Mr. Watson, for reviewal. Frick will be sending Carnegie a copy it. October 31, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 47. Frick wires Carnegie on Park's agreement to the plan. November 4, 1890 Telegram
 52. Frick wires Carnegie on how nothing was new and that the agreement has been submitted to him and will be signed. November 6, 1890 Telegram
 55. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him of the amount of unmade rails, and informs Carnegie that he and some associates have sold off as many resources as possible except pig iron, which will ensure their competitive edge in the rails industry. November 13, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 59. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message. November 19, 1890 Telegram
 59. Frick wires Carnegie that options are in good enough shape to close if Carnegie approves. Frick will visit him on Saturday. [attached to previous correspondence] November 20, 1890 
 62. Frick write Carnegie to respond to his comment about payment and monetary investments as well as inform him on their dealings in Ohio and the funding of the Central Bank of Pittsburgh. November 25, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 66. Frick wires Carnegie his response, "Under the circumstances, yes; although it will be giving away an opportunity for another Youghiogheny Northern." November 28, 1890 Telegram
 67. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss the possibility of opening up a new railroad line that would connect them to ovens which currently are only accessible through the Pennsylvania Railroad. He mentions the possibility of immense profit from this endeavor, but resigns to not profit for diplomatic reasons. November 28, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 74. Frick writes Carnegie that he will not let up on Vanderbilt or Roberts and details an upcoming business trip. December 8, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 77. Frick wires Carnegie on his arrival to Philadelphia tomorrow. He would like to meet with Carnegie and Mr. Phipps tomorrow about the Pittsburgh & Western matter. December 10, 1890 Telegram
 87. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss the projected rail production and how that affects contracts and the desire to be free of stock. December 20, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 90. Frick writes Carnegie to propose the hiring of Mr. E. H. Utley for the positions of General Agent for the Carnegie brothers and Co. and to discuss expanding the office space of the Frick and Carnegie Companies. December 22, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 94. Frick wires Carnegie that the party agrees to give 200, but the rate is too high. Frick thinks the mill will start on the 29th. December 23, 1890 Telegram
 97. Frick writes on selling all of their pig iron and starting the mill on the 29th. December 23, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 103. Frick asks Carnegie if he received and forwarded the Eno letter yesterday. Also reports on the weather. December 26, 1890 Telegram
 108. Frick writes on Mr. [Philander] Knox asking Frick if he would recommend Mr. [James] Reed for a judicial appointment. December 27, 1890  Typed Letter Signed
 109. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss a monetary arrangement with Mr. Oliver over the Pittsburgh & Western, as well as to inform Carnegie of a fire that occurred at the United Coal and Coke Company works. December 27, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 112. Frick thinks Carnegie should subscribe individually for 25,000 to Brake's paper. December 29, 1890 Telegram
 119. Frick writes to Carnegie to discuss a piece of property that is being developed and to discuss the breakdown of common stock. December 29, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 121. Frick writes that he'll make a subscription for Carnegie; however, Frick will not be making his own subscription. December 29, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 124. Frick writes on his conversation with Mr. Thomas M. King and how King thinks that Pittsburgh & Western's debt is a stumbling block in negotiations with his company. December 30, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 125. Frick writes Carnegie about an impending strike and how he thinks it should be handled, which he has left to a Mr. Gayley to oversee. December 30, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 128. Frick writes on the balance sheets for October, November, and December. December 31, 1890  Typed Letter Signed
 129. Frick reports on the interest of Carnegie Brothers & Co.'s invested partners. December 31, 1890 Typed Letter Signed
 131. Frick wires Carnegie on the furnaces being practically banked this morning. January 1, 1891 Telegram
 132. Frick writes on a strike at Bessemer. January 2, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 142. Frick asks Carnegie to look over statements on stock comparisons of finished products and materials for use on hand for Jan. 1889, Oct. 1890, and Dec. 1890. [Statements included] January 7, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 148. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him that Frick feels it is in their interest to drop the Pittsburgh and Western railroad in favor of the B & O due to pricing. January 10, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 151. Frick states that he is unable to go East before tomorrow evening. Also, consolidation between Lackawanna [Iron and Steel Company] and Scranton [Iron and Steel] signed. January 12, 1891 Telegram
 154. Frick wants to get Allegheny Bessemer Steel Organization into better shape and wants to release Messrs, Slagle, and [Frank] Doubleday. [Statement of outstanding bills for Pittsburgh & Western at 11/1/90 included.] January 12, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 183. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him that he is aware of what Carnegie feels should be done about the Pittsburgh and Western railroad, discussing other issues that have since cropped up and mentioning how things are going where he is. January 19, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 191. Frick wires Carnegie and sends congratuations. January 22, 1891 Telegram
 196. Frick writes that he is glad Carnegie disposed of their stock in Pittsburgh & Western and that they are storing as much coke as possible at Edgar Thomson. January 22, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 201. Frick writes Carnegie to extend his comfort with the deal to be signed regarding the Pittsburgh and Western railroad. January 23, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 203. Frick writes Carnegie entrusting him with information regarding the property holdings of the Frick Coke Company, their earnings for 1890, and comments on a book compiled by Mr. Childs. January 24, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 208. Frick received Carnegie's telegram. He thinks their company should make a liberal subscription and to see it distributed properly. Also, 125 men were accidently killed in the mines. January 28, 1891 Telegram
 215. Frick asks if Carnegie could arrive next Tuesday and is delighted that papers are signed. January 31, 1891 Telegram
 219. Frick would like Carnegie to telegraph his thoughts on what they should say to Mr. Gould. Also, an order from Richmond & Danville was received, and Frick thinks [Thomas] Morrison will be a good manager for Duquesne. January 31, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 227. Frick writes Carnegie that he will attend a rail maker's meeting in New York City on Wednesday and lists issues he will discuss with Carnegie in person. February 2, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 230. Frick wires Carnegie saying that important matters are keeping him here, but [John] Leishman will attend meeting instead. February 3, 1891 Telegram
 231. Frick thinks [Henry] Oliver's case is desperate, but they should give him the $50,000 despite it. February 3, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 236. Frick writes on the status of discussions with the Knights of Labor involving Frick Coke Company and McClure Coke Company. February 4, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 239. Frick writes that Mr. [Henry] Oliver wants an answer to his letter, and Semple would like them to make him an offer on 4,500 shares of the Common Stock. February 4, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 241. Frick writes that T.M. King is please with the recent deals and was discussing possible locations for the main station. Nothing new to report on the coke situation, except McClure Coke Company is voluntarily closing down. Also, Mr. Scott's friends is willing to buy bonds on certain conditions. February 5, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 242. Frick wires Carnegie that he arrived on time and will be waiting for the letter. February 9, 1891 Telegram
 245. Frick wires Carnegie describing the steel output for Duquesne Works for February 9, 1891. February 10, 1891 Telegram
 245. Frick wires Carnegie that he did not receive a letter from him this morning. [attached to previous correspondence] February 10, 1891 
 247. Frick wires Carnegie that [James] Reed was appointed as a judge, and that Carnegie should congratulate the President on the appointment. Frick would also like for Carnegie to express the Homestead book. February 10, 1891 Telegram
 296. Frick writes Carnegie to describe an issue he wishes to discuss which is the management of the Keystone Bridge Company, he also mentions multiple small pieces of business. March 11, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 300. Frick writes that Messrs. [Daniel] Clemson, and [James] Gayley returned from their trip through the ore regions, and Gayley has new thoughts on Norrie ore. Mr. Clarke was in the their New York [N.Y.] office today discussing the New York Central order, and they closed with Louisville & Nashville today. Also, their drafting department was destroyed due to a fire that burned down the Weldin Block. March 12, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 306. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him of the gas line and projects how profitable it will be, saving them money in the long run. March 14, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 308. Frick wires Carnegie that [Henry] Oliver is home, papers are signed, and Mr. Morgan has almost consented. March 16, 1891 Telegram
 309. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss the closing of a contract with the B & O, asking if the common stock will be taken by Carnegie. March 16, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 313. Frick writes Carnegie that the B & O contract is closed and asks for an immediate wire consenting or denying the acquiring of common stock. March 16, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 316. Frick writes on his conversation with Mr. [Henry] Oliver on his bonds, and will not feel badly if Carnegie refuses him. March 20, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 318. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him business is slow and mentions adjusting wages for the workers, he also asks Carnegie to not visit until April seeing as he wants all of his people home when Carnegie comes and the labor issue should be resolved by then. March 20, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 321. Frick wires Carnegie telling him that there was a small start at several of the mills this morning. March 26, 1891 Telegram
 322. Frick writes Carnegie to reopen a conversation between them regarding Carnegie selling Frick something, presumably stock. March 26, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 323. Frick writes that he gave Mr. Lynch discretionary power to start the works when he thought best. There is enough coke at Edgar Thomson to run until the middle of April, and there are some rail orders that are pressing them. March 26, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 329. Frick writes that he doesn't think they should be in a hurry to make a contract for ore, the Bank of Pittsburgh is offering money at a reduced price, high sulpher iron was shipped to Duquesne, and Frick will wire him when the coke strike ends. March 26, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 331. Frick wires Carnegie that the situation wasn't good this morning. [attached to previous correspondence] March 30, 1891 
 332. Frick wires Carnegie that the situation was more favorable today. They have the sentiment of the press and people, and the Fayette County judge granted a preliminary injuction. March 31, 1891 Telegram
 332. Frick wires Carnegie that the Governor ordered the Tenth Regiment Pennsylvania Militia to the Coke Region. Eleven people killed and 46 wounded. [attached to the previous correspondence] April 2, 1891 
 334. Frick wires Carnegie that all is quiet in the Region, and that Jimtown and Adelaide are working with increased forces. April 3, 1891 Telegram
 335. Frick refutes Mr. Watchorn's [Ex-Secretary of the Miners Union] interview in the Pittsburgh Post. not dated Typed Letter Signed
 339. Frick writes on Mr. Watchorn's [Ex-Secretary of the Miners Union] interview in the Pittsburgh Post and his request to inclose his statement in tomorrow's paper. April 3, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 340. Frick wires Carnegie that he is glad about Carnegie's upcoming visit, and the Coke Region is still quiet. April 4, 1891 Telegram
 345. Frick writes on the authorization to transfer from his credit all dividends declared upon the capital of Carnegie Brothers & Co. April 11, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 346. Frick writes on the authorization to transfer from his credit all dividends declared upon of the capital of Carnegie Brothers & Co. April 11, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 347. Frick writes that the Company held its own this morning, and writes on the status of Adelaide, Kyle, Morewood, and McClure [Coke Company]. April 13, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 349. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him of a business meeting and to tell him that business is picking up. April 14, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 354. Frick writes that Frick Coke Co. shipped 90 cars, and the gain in the Coke Region wasn't as much as he had expected. April 15, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 356. Frick writes that the Frick Coke Co. continued to make gains, and includes his conversation with M. A. Hanna [President of the Chapin Mining Company]. April 16, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 358. Frick received Carnegie's note from yesterday about selling his interest, and Frick sent it to [Francis] Lovejoy to prepare the papers. April 16, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 359. Frick wires Carnegie that there was no gain this morning over yesterday, but the company still held its own. April 17, 1891 Telegram
 363. Frick writes Carnegie about the situation at Leisenring no. 2 where Pinkerton men have been called in to protect the men who do desire to work, he also mentions that business in general is picking up more. April 20, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 365. Frick writes Carnegie to note that the Pinkerton men have arrives and a group of Itaian workers were sent to the works shortly thereafter which, along with the native men who do want to work, should be enough to run Leisenring no. 2 at full capacity before long. April 21, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 367. Frick writes that he thinks they are going to win before too long. He also mentions an ore purchase and a letter from Mr. [George] Lauder. April 22, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 370. Frick writes that the company held their own today. A riot at Adelaide caused them to have fewer men; however, Frick thinks things will work out for the company. April 23, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 371. Frick wires Carnegie that things are improving. [attached to previous correspondence] April 24, 1891 
 372. Frick wires Carnegie that things are still slowly improving. April 25, 1891 Telegram
 374. Frick wires Carnegie that he'll see him tomorrow and that the situation looks better. April 25, 1891 Telegram
 379. Frick wires Carnegie that there has been slight improvement. April 27, 1891 Telegram
 380. Frick writes that there has been slight improvement. They have gained almost all of the works, except a few men at Adelaide. There were complaints from workers that pay was low. April 27, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 385. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him that he has sent a group of men up to Adelaide who understand the circumstance and forsees the possibility of a profitable year if the coke strike is put down. April 28, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 387. Frick wires Carnegie that things look well today. April 29, 1891 Telegram
 392. Frick writes that they sent more men into the Coke Region, and his found things in good shape during his visit to Bessemer. April 29, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 394. Frick wires Carnegie that they gained a few men this morning at several places. May 4, 1891 Telegram
 402. Frick writes on the status of the blooming mill, rail mill, and furnaces. May 7, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 404. Frick wires Carenegie that it was a good day, and he included the rail and billet count.[attached to previous correspondence] May 7, 1891 
 417. Frick writes Carnegie to tell him that significant improvements have occurred since he left including the impending end of the strike and a boom in business. May 21, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 432. Frick writes on the coke strike ending in their favor and on the status of Carnegie Brothers & Co. Ltd.'s business. June 4, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 440. Frick has returned and has retained the papers that were needed. June 8, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 441. Frick received Carnegie's telegram, and he thinks that the McClure property is less desirable because of the bad financial status of the partners. Frick also writes on the Pittsburgh & Western bonds and practices at Homestead. June 10, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 451. Frick writes on including statements and memorandums on financial results, the hot weather affecting Edgar Thomson, and business with McClure associations. June 22, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 468. Frick writes on the amount of rail tonnage and coke produced and on settling with Mr. [Henry] Oliver over the Pittsburgh & Western bonds. June 30, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 476. Frick writes Carnegie to give a detailed explanation about the strike at Duquesne and explains that they will pay all of the men in full then tell them they will open on a specified day, any open positions will be filled by new employees. Frick feel confident that this strike will not be detrimental to the business. July 7, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 483. Frick writes on including a letter from Mr. [Francis] Lovejoy on his stock accounts, and on the discrepancy on promising Mr. [George] Lauder one percent. July 9, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 488. Frick writes on his conversation with Henry Oliver on his inability to take and pay for his share of the Pittsburgh & Western bonds. July 13, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 492. Frick writes on Mr. Nimick's [Nimick & Company] troubling financial situation and his business relations with Mr. Henry Oliver. July 14, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 495. Frick writes Carnegie that after paying the workers he and his associates received letters from the men saying they were ready to work when the works were ready to begin again, he also noted that many men had contacts who neded work that could fill any open positions. July 14, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
  Volume
General Letterpress Book, July 23, 1891-August 16, 1892 7
 4. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message. August 18, 1891 Telegram
 8. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss the price of Pennsylvania and Western preferred, noting their earnings for the year so far, and mentioning a new contract with the Pennsylvania Company. August 19, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 110. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him of a meeting Frick had with Mr. Linderman and to discuss the memorandum with Mr. Abbott. November 21, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 114. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him Frick will be selling Union Supply Company stock to the current shareholders, Carnegie is one, based on the proportion of the company the stock holders own in return for payment of the stock. November 23, 1891 Typed Letter Signed
 173. Frick wires Carnegie saying that he has wired the gentleman, but he thinks Carnegie's letter is sufficient. December 19, 1891 Telegram
 461. Frick writes Carnegie that Mr. Singer and his family are sailing on the City of Paris and, if an invitation is extended, they would be happy to go to Carnegie's place. July 19, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
  Volume
General Letterpress Book, August 16, 1892-July 27, 1893 8

No pages containing Frick-Carnegie correspondence.

  Volume
General Letterpress Book, July 29, 1893-November 16, 1894 9

No pages containing Frick-Carnegie correspondence.

  Volume
General Letterpress Book, November 17, 1894-October 18, 1895 10
 476. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss the buying of the McClure Coke Company with the possibility of Mr. Donnelly gaining stock in the Frick Coke Company at the same price and up to the same amount as that which he may sell. October 11, 1895 Typed Letter Signed
  Volume
General Letterpress Book, October 19, 1895-May 19, 1896 11
 7. Carnegie writes on the finalized agreement of the McClure Coke Company purchase. Frick hopes the deal will be kept quiet until the matters that are pending are closed. October 21, 1895 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Frick writes on railroad transportation for November 4th, and asks if he has any acquaintances that should be invited to a dinner given for Mr. and Mrs. Smith. October 25, 1895 Telegram
 16. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss Rainey taking control of the McClure Coke Company which has just been acquired by Frick and Carnegie. October 25, 1895 Typed Letter Signed
 19. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him that Mr. Leishman was permitted to renew an arrangement with the rail makers for 1896. October 26, 1895 Typed Letter Signed
 21. Frick writes Carnegie about a gallery opening in Pittsburgh and mentions his desire for railroad companies to provide special rates for the country people who may want to come. October 26, 1895 Telegram
 37. Frick writes Carnegie to tell him they have bought the Fairchance Coke Works and all of Cochran's coke for 1896 as well as to mention that once Rainey has proven himself to be on their side there is no reason why an amicable relationship cannot exist. October 29, 1895 Typed Letter Signed
 132. Frick writes on coke being tested that is less superior than Connellsville Coke, and mentions they permitted the option to expire in relation to Mr. J.V. Thompson's property in Connellsville. December 4, 1895 Typed Letter Signed
 229. Frick writes Carnegie a summary of the earnings for 1895 and explains why the amounts are thus and what future plans are in place to increase profit. January 18, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 242. Frick writes Carnegie to ask him for advise about a business disagreement between Donnelly and Snyder, the sellers, and a coke company regarding the price of land and the available coal underneath the property. January 24, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 278. Frick writes on Col. Dick's project and thinks they should construct their own road from the Coke Region to Bessemer and Duquesne. February 6, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 295. Frick wires Carnegie that Knight advances their Western Senator on fair security with gurantee conduct and will return in four months. February 15, 1896 Telegram
 308. Frick writes Carnegie about a discussion he has with Mr. McCrea regarding the excessive railroad rates and a roadway that had been proposed which would alleviate the extra charge. February 22, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 369. Frick writes on a meeting to be held on April 8th that will include Messrs. Thomson, [James] McCrea, Judge Reed, and Mr. Grammer. Frick asks if Carnegie has any suggestions on who else should be present. March 31, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 403. Frick writes on Mr. Thomson and him meeting Carnegie in Philadelphia. April 20, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 431. Frick writes on Mr. T. asking Carnegie for a fix hour interview tomorrow, and Frick will be in Philadelpha tomorrow. April 27, 1896 Telegram
 432. Frick writes on the building of Dick Road being settled and Carnegie's proposal will be considered. April 28, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 434. Frick writes that he inclosed a copy of Mr. [Philander] Knox's letter from the 27th. April 29, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 440. Frick writes on their differences on building the Coke road. April 20, 1896 Autographed Letter Signed
 444. Frick writes on Mr. Miller rendering his decisoin in the dispute between Frick Coke Company, Donnelly, and Snyder. April 30, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 451. Frick sends Carnegie a copy of the agreement between Carnegie Steel Co., Ltd., Union Railroad Co., and the Pittsburgh, Shenango, & Lake Erie Railroad Co.. May 4, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 454. Frick doesn't think Bacon's amendment will become law. May 4, 1896 Telegram
 454. Frick thinks Carnegie should call Judge Reed today. [attached to previous correspondence] May 5, 1896 
 463. Frick thinks Carnegie should see the parties on his return from here. May 8, 1896 Telegram
 463. Frick will meet Carnegie on Monday in Phildelphia. [attached to previous correspondence] May 8, 1896 
 470. Frick will join Carnegie on Limited Jersey City on Monday morning. May 9, 1896 Telegram
  Volume
General Letterpress Book, May 19-December 10, 1896 12
 3. Frick writes on his communication with Mr. Charles Stewart Smith on investing in Butler & Pittsburg for his friend, J. Edward Simmons [President Fourth National Bank]. May 19, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 34. Frick writes on railroads being disappointed that P.R.R. did not succeed in stopping Butler & Pittsburgh Road. Also, Illinois Steel Co. canceled their coke order, and the coke orders have been disappointing. June 2, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 37. Frick writes on Pennsylvania Railroad's execution of their agreement made with Mr. Carnegie and on Frick's conferences with Mr. Joyce, Mr. Chipley, and Mr. Thomson. June 1, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 60. Frick writes on Frick Coke Co. and allied companies showing profit for the first five months this year. Also, he advised the Judge [Reed] and Mr. [Philander] Knox to dispose of their Pittsburgh & Shenango Stock. June 11, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 138. Frick writes on his upcoming vacation, the depressing business outlook, the contract for building Butler & Pittsburgh being awarded to McDonald, and calling on Mr. Lockhart. July 13, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 147. Frick writes on Judge [James] Reed securing a copy of an agreement between Conneaut Terminal Railroad Co., Pittsburgh Shenango & Lake Erie Railroad Co., and the Pittsburgh & Conneaut Dock Co. July 14, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 158. Frick congratulates Carnegie on the condition of the firm's affairs. August 24, 1896 Telegram
 199. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss future business plans, the possible election of McKinley, and the slow pace of business. September 7, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 257. Frick writes, "Arranges to have conduct cloud loaned to Dick sixty day collateral note on his confess shares Shenango." September 28, 1896 Telegram
 301. Frick writes Carnegie to describe Prince Hilkoff's visit to Homestead and the Westinghouse works. Prince Hilkoff is the Imperial Minister of Railways and Communication of Russia. October 12, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 350. Frick writes on the lease of Mahoning Ore Co., and he thinks Mr. [John] Leishman, Mr. [Henry] Curry, and Mr. [Henry] Oliver should meet with Mr. Rockefeller's representative this week. October 26, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 358. Frick writes on knowing the financial situation of Shenango soon. October 28, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 392. Frick writes on selling Carnegie's New York & Cleveland Gas Coal Co. Stock. November 17, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 397. Frick writes Carnegie about a possible alliance with Rockefeller. November 18, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 424. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him that the Carnegie Steel Company owns the majority of the stock of the new road that is to be built and explains the effects the new road will have on railroad rates. November 27, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 427. Frick writes Carnegie about the possibility to lease half of the Norrie mine which, with the agreement that was signed with Rockefeller, would provide more than enough ore for Frick and Carnegie. November 30, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 441. Frick thanks Carnegie, and writes that the bottle was received. December 4, 1896 Telegram
 441. Frick includes who received first, second, first medal, second medal, and third medal. [attached to previous correspondence] December 4, 1896 
 444. Frick writes on the eye wash bottle being received at Holland House yesterday, and on wiring Carnegie the Board's decision. December 4, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 454. Frick writes on the Rockefeller papers not being received yet and on Judge Reed holding 30,000 shares of Shenango Stock that was turned over by Dick and Huldekoper. Also, Frick visited [John] Pontefract at Dr. Sutton's hospital. December 7, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 457. Frick writes on his promise to Mr. Thomson to write him of the extension of the Union Railway Co. to Allegheny River. December 7, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 471. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss the gold clause and how that affects the cost of ore. December 9, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
  Volume
General Letterpress Book, December 10, 1896-May 4, 1897 13
 4. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss a discourse between himself and Gates over the downfall of the Illinois Steel Company and the possibility of leasing the company. December 10, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 25. Carnegie should write in regard to their friend promptly because the Senator thinks there is a good chance. December 16, 1896 Telegram
 25. Frick writes that the portrait request is before the President Elect this morning, and Frick thinks Carnegie should telegraph him and urge him to grant it. [attached to previous correspondence] December 16, 1896 
 34. Frick writes on selecting Mr. [Philander] Knox for the position because the President Elect would grant any favor of Carnegie's. December 16, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 36. Frick informs Carnegie that Mr. [Philander] Knox is advised by Presedent Elect that he grants his request as to portait. December 17, 1896 Telegram
 41. Frick writes on sending Senator [Matthew] Quay an Act that they would like to have passed regarding the Union Railroad bridge. December 17, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 42. [Frank] Thomson addresses misunderstandings about his meeting with Frick and Carnegie in Philadelphia. December 16, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 53. Frick thinks Carnegie's letter to the President-Elect regarding Mr. [Philander] Knox is a gem, and includes his conversation with Col. Schoonmaker. December 21, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 94. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss stock options and actions to be taken in relation to a declaration of trust between the Carnegie Steel Company and other entities. December 28, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 103. Frick writes on the employment of Mr. McSwiggan from "The Post," who will help slant headlines and content in their favor. December 29, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 104. Frick writes on Mr. [Henry] Curry buying back his one-half percent that he previously sold. Frick includes memorandum on the individual ownership of company interest. December 29, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 116. Frick writes on Mr. [Henry] Curry buying back his one-half percent that he previously sold. Frick includes memorandum on the individual ownership of company interest. December 29, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 117. Carnegie writes Frick to discuss a new hire and the breakdown of stock options given to employees. December 30, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 119. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss Union Railway Company bonds as well as ore and transportation costs. December 31, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 175. Frick writes on the current poor finances of Illinois Steel due to bank troubles in Chicago, [Ill.]. January 12, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 216. Frick writes on Mr. Leishman wanting to leave the company; Frick suggested he go to England and represent the company abroad. January 27, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 221. Frick writes on his conversation with Mr. [John] Leishman, and Frick thinks Leishman should bring Mr. [Philander] Knox with him for his presentation to the Naval Committee next Tuesday. January 28, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 227. Frick encloses a memorandum from Mr. [John] Leishman, copies of letters from Lieutenant Stone to Mr. Phipps, and a copy of Senator Chandler's Report. Also, Mr. [A.M.] Moreland is working on an analyzation of Secretary's Report. January 29, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 228. [Joseph] Wharton and [Robert] Linderman will call at Carnegie's house on Monday, but Frick will arrive earlier. Also, the President is better this morning, but will not be going to Washington on Tuesday. January 30, 1897 Telegram
 241. Frick wires Carnegie that the Committee didn't discuss price limits. February 4, 1897 Telegram
 244. Frick writes Carnegie to outline an issue being raised by Mr. Scranton who made a price agreement regarding New England roads, but it selling at the same price to non-New England entities. February 5, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 260. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him that Mr. Scranton was told to withdraw from the association, which dissolved the rail pool. February 6, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 263. Gates has postponed action until tomorrow. Frick includes his reply by stating that he will not stand Gate's disregard for their exisiting agreement. February 9, 1897 Telegram
 286. Frick writes on his meeting with Mr. Mather and on whether there should be an Ore Association and what their prices should be. February 16, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 290. Frick doesn’t think there is any danger of anyone buying control of New York & Cleveland stock. February 16, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 295. Frick writes on value of Norrie and Chandler ores and on Mr. Mather having Hanna, Oglebay, and others to agree to a meeting of Ore men. February 17, 1897 Typed letter Signed
 308. Frick wires Carnegie telling him that he'll see him around noon tomorrow at 51st St. February 18, 1897 Telegram
 328. Frick writes on his conversation with Mr. Mather, and he gathers that it is unlikely for the association to last long. February 24, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 341. Frick would like a detailed statement of tonnage furnished by the Sales Department. February 26, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 344. Frick doesn't think it would be a good idea to go outside of Pickends, Mather & Co. for Norrie ore. Frick also writes on Mr. Schoonmaker's meeting with Mr. H.H. Rogers, and General Alger thinking they should buy "Volunteer" ore. February 26, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 346. Frick asks if Carnegie will be in New York, [N.Y.] on Monday. February 27, 1897 Telegram
 352. Frick writes that Mr. [Alexander] Peacock showed him a contract on a railroad in Canada for Lake Erie & Detroit River Railway Co. for 5400 tons. February 27, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 353 Frick writes on his talk with Mr. Mather about ore prices prior to Mather's meeting with the Ore Association. February 27, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 355. Frick writes on his trip to Palm Beach, [Fla.] via Washinton [D.C.] and asks Carnegie to join his party. February 27, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 357. Frick has written Carnegie today. February 27, 1897 Telegram
  Volume
General Letterpress Book, May 4-November 30, 1897 14
 14. Frick asks Carnegie if he would favor selling bonds of P., B. & L.E. Road at par and accrued interest. Frick also comments on business running smoothly and on Messrs. [John] Leishman and [Robert] Linderman not accomplishing much abroad. May 7, 1897 Typer letter Signed
 30. Frick thanks Carnegie for his telegram in regard to Helen [Frick] and writes on there being greater ease in the money market. May 13, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 189. Frick writes Carnegie to tell him Mrs. Frick said she doubted Mrs. Carnegie would be seeing anyone for sometime and details the Frick family travel plans while noting the possibility of a favorable ore lease from Rockefeller. July 6, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 261. Frick writes Carnegie about possibly leveraging Norrie stock for leasing, which Frick feels is a better option than buying. He also includes profit information but notes the numbers are low because the prices are low. September 10, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 281. Frick wires Carnegie a message on the Oliver Mining Co. September 20, 1897 Cablegram
 310. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him Dr. Hulst will be taking control of their ore interests and asks Carnegie to be present for the founder's day celebration which, he hints, may also be attended by President McKinley. October 2, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 378. Frick updates Carnegie on the status of Bessemer Road, Dick's claim, the rail pool, and the Iron Clad Agreement. October 21, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 387. Frick writes Carnegie to propose that they sell a plant to the government so the government can have a second world-class armor plant available should they need it. October 22, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 408. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss a possible business agreement with Mellon over a roadway and to discuss the upcoming art gallery opening. October 27, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 454. Frick writes Carnegie to outline earnings. November, 1897 Autographed Letter Signed
 469. Frick writes that Woodrock is seriously considering appointing Weibel in his Cabinet. November 18, 1897 Cablegram
 475. Frick writes Carnegie to explain that Mellon could build the proposed roadway cheaper than anyone else and would be willing to lease or sell it to the Union Railroad. November 22, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 484. Mrs. Frick, Helen, and Childs wish Carnegie many and happy returns of the day. November 24, 1897 Cablegram
  Volume
General Letterpress Book, November 30, 1897-April 29, 1898 15
 1. Frick writes on enclosing letters from Judge [James] Reed and Mr. House and on including maps of the Union Railroad extension and a line to the Coke Region. Also, Carnegie should expect a proposition from Mr. Mellon soon. November 30, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss a conversation he had with Mr. Thomson over the need to build a road that Frick and Carnegie own, which made Thomson ask if his company could get a guaranteed price for transportation which Frick rejected. December 2, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 13. Frick replies to Carnegie's note from the 21st regarding interests to be distributed at the first of the year. December 4, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 35. Frick writes on Mr. Morrison complaining that he has been getting too large of a proportion of Youghiogheny and Lartmer Coke. Frick includes the net profit for Frick Coke and Allied Companies for November and hopes he can convince Mr. Phipps to sign the "Iron Clad." Frick encloses a memorandum on cash dividends paid to Mr. Andrew Carnegie by H.C. Frick Coke Co. and allied companies during year 1897. December 13, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 47. Frick wires Carnegie on Vandevort dying yesterday due to a pulmonary hemorrhage. December 17, 1897 Cablegram
 52. Frick writes on the Heads of Operating Department giving a dinner to Mr. [Charles] Schwab, and Frick encloses a letter from [J.T.] Odell to Judge [James] Reed. December 20, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 97. Frick writes on interests of the company's partners. January 3, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 139. Frick writes on Mellon prefering to build 18 miles under contract with their railroads, meeting with Mr. Phipps on the "Iron Clad," thinking they should purchase the Carrie Furnace plant, and on Mr. Morrison's furnace report being discouraging. January 10, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 159. Frick wires Carnegie on their argument being finished tomorrow and their side looking favorable. January 13, 1898 Cablegram
 184. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss favorable railroad costs and the steps that need to be taken to avoid any labor issues, this was prompted by the superintendent of Duquesne informing Frick he heard disgruntled talks from men who were overworked from the increased business. January 17, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 199. Frick writes Carnegie to inform him that Mellon and the B & O railroad have made propositionsand that Frick has sent a letter to the secretary of the Navy and intends to appeal to the president regarding a settlement with Schneider's people. January 20, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 274. Frick writes Carnegie to tell him the deal with Mellon should be closed soon and to inform him there has been a shortage of rails and pig iron. February 8, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 289. Frick writes on them having more stock of material on hand than the Illinois Steel Co., the Foundry Coke trade increasing, and railroad business on the P.R.R. falling off. February 10, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 294. Frick writes on a dispute on Schwab and Peacock's interest. February 11, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 296. Frick writes Carnegie to mention the discrepency regarding the shares Peacock and Schwab have given their recently appointed positions as Vice-President and President respectively. January 28, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 297. Frick writes on understanding the desire to replace Mr. Archer and find a new director for the symphony orchestra. February 11, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 311. Frick wires Carnegie that the January figures are late, but business is healthy. February 18, 1898 Cablegram
 314. Frick encloses the Frick Coke Company statement for 1897, and writes on P.,B. & L. E. needing money to finish building and on its floating debt. Also, Frick isn't looking for a buyer for the coal property near Uniontown that he owns. February 19, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 323. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message. February 21, 1898 Cablegram
 323. The Carrie Furance Company is considering building a mill, and now has less disposition to sell. Frick thinks they can buy it for $750,000 and will know by Friday. [This is the translation to the previously coded message] [attached to previous correspondence] February 21, 1898 
 336. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message with 'possession May first' discernable. February 25, 1898 Cablegram
 338. Frick writes on purchasing Carrie Furnances and on Mr. Bakewell informing him that the decision in the Mixer case doesn't look promising for them. February 25, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 342. Frick writes on the Sixteenth Annual Report of H.C. Frick Coke Company and Allied Companies, the higher prices for coke being obtained by an understanding with all operators in the Region, and on Mr. Fownes asking to be paid in gold for the Carrie Furnaces purchase. February 26, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 352. Frick includes corrections to the Sixteenth Annual Report of H.C. Frick Coke Company and Allied Companies. March 1, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 380. Frick includes statement showing earnings of Union Supply Company, Limited, for six months, and a statement showing net earnings of Frick Coke Company for January and February of 1898. Also, Frick writes on the indebtedness of P.,B. & L. E. Railroad. March 12, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 398. Frick writes on the Carrie Furnace plant being worth all that they pay for it and his regrets on Annual Report of Frick Coke Co. not as he would have liked. March 19, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 410. Frick writes that he inclosed a copy of Mr. Walker's letter, and thinks they can afford to invest their Extinguishment Fund. March 22, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 422. Frick writes that indications for Tilden are better than expected and mentions business they have with John Pitcairn and Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company. March 24, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 443. Frick writes on the Bessemer Road debt and the "Maine" being blown up in Cuba. April 4, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 462. Frick writes on rate reductions, the the course of action for the debt of Bessemer Road, and confirms the corrections to the Frick Coke Company Annual Report. April 19, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 476. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message. April 23, 1898 Cablegram
 476. Frick wires Carnegie that he has purchased Conneaut. [Translation to the previously coded message.] [attached to previous correspondence] April 23, 1898 
 477. Frick writes Carnegie about the need to replace Dick with Grammer as President for the road in the Bessemer Railroad matter, he also wishes to keep the Judge Reed on as chairman seeing as he is well-liked. April 28, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 494. Frick writes on the proposed consolidation between Illinois Steel Co., Cambria Iron, Lackawanna, Minnesota Iron Co., and the American Steel & Wire Co., and also on possible land acquisition near Homestead. April 28, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
  Volume
General Letterpress Book, April 10, 1898-February 16, 1899 16
 12. Frick writes Carnegie to tel him Gus Painter is anxious to sell, but at a higher price than he finds reasonable. May 6, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 20. Frick writes on his interview with [John W.] Gates, who thinks they should be the owners of Illinois Steel Co., the poor showing of the Sales Department, and encloses a memorandum on reduction of indebtedness. May 7, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 28. Frick writes on his conversation with Judge [James] Reed, and thinks that it would be better if Reed were Chairman of Board and have someone familiar with railroad negotations as President. May 9, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 31. Frick writes on ore rates for the Pennsylvania Railroad and on the Illinois Steel Company giving the Baltimore & Ohio all their coke business from the Connellsville Region. May 10, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 43. Frick thinks the time for Carnegie Steel Company to own all the stock in H.C. Frick Coke Company has arrived, and writes on the indebtedness in Coke Company Stock, and on future consolidation in the coke properties. May 12, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 38. Frick wires Carnegie a coded telegram. May 12, 1898 Cablegram
 38. Frick wires Carnegie that orders are coming in freely and that everything is running smoothly. [Translation to the previously coded message.] [attached to previous correspondence] May 12, 1898 
 52. Frick writes to Carnegie to describe the state of the Isabella Furnaces and to mention a piece of artwork he recently bought which is to be exhibited. May 14, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 76. Frick writes Carnegie to discuss the situation regarding the possible buying of a property from Painter. May 20, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 85. Frick writes Carnegie reporting how some of the mines are doing, indicating that there is land that he wants to buy, and that he does not wish to travel abroad this year. May 24, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 113. Frick thinks it would be unwise to buy Isabella Furnaces and writes on his purchase of 300 acres near Chicago, [Ill.]. June 2, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 137. Frick writes Carnegie about a possible merger between multiple companies and the viability of Chicago or Pittsburgh as a manufactoring center. June 10, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 141. Frick writes Carnegie informing him that the Iron Clad Agreement was never valid and introduces a similar document that should be signed by all interested parties. June 10, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 160. Frick writes on visiting the Carrie Furnances and Homestead and on traveling on their new road from Homestead to Duquesne. Frick also includes the agreement to have the Association take over Frick Coke Company Stock. June 16, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 174. Frick writes on Nickel Plate's authority to make any rate to Chicago, [Ill.] that they desire, and writes on their rates with the B.& O. and P.R.R.. June 17, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 183. Frick writes on his upcoming European vacation. June 18, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 413. Frick writes Carnegie about a Mr. Herriott who owns property on Bellefield that Carnegie is interested in. October 27, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 414. Frick comments on the article, "New Ovens, Connellsville and Lorain, Illinois Steel Company" in the New York Evening Post, and writes on Illinois Steel Company desiring a property exchange with them. October 27, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 439. Frick writes Carnegie about property and enclosed a statement of the Frick Coke Company affairs. November 10, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 478. Frick writes on the propery value for Connellsville properties and that everything is in good shape. November 21, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 503. Frick writes Carnegie about a proposed car shop location and possible ways to keep Mr. Rockafeller and Federal Steel from coming to an agreement. December 5, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 517. Frick writes Carnegie that demand is heavy and enclosed a document detailing a merger in which the Carnegie Company is in control. December 10, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 539. Frick writes to Carnegie on there being a mistake as to the friction over the coke question extending beyond yourself and Mr. [George] lauder. December 17, 1898 Cablegram
 553. Frick responds to a letter from Carnegie from December 24th in regards to making some financial changes in the company. Frick speaks of forming a new company and purchasing Money Mortgage Bonds. These would be split between the Steel and Coke companies. December 27, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 557. Frick writes on accepting Mr. [John] Pontefract's resignation as Supply Agent and encloses Pontefract's account at November 30, 1898. December 29, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 562. Frick writes on the time it would take to start a new company and suggests a meeting between several people about it. December 30, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 568. Frick encloses an agreement made by Mr. [Philander] Knox on the merging of Carnegie Steel Company, Limited and the H.C. Frick Coke Company. January 2, 1899 Typed Letter Signed
 610. Frick wires Carnegie on the Attorney General deciding the Nickel case in their favor. January 18, 1899 Telegram
 632. Frick writes on an order for 2,000 cars and includes results for Frick Coke Company and Allied Companies for 1898. January 24, 1899 Typed Letter Signed
 678. Frick writes on acquiring Keystone [Bridge Works] and deciding to abandon building cars. Frick includes Keystone Bridge Works earnings. February 7, 1899 Typed Letter Signed
 687. Frick wires Carnegie on Helen Frick's improved health and on Morrison and [James] Gayley being elected. February 14, 1899 Telegram
 694. Frick received Carnegie's letter from February 11th, and he writes that Negaunse closed. February 15, 1899 Telegram
  Volume
General Letterpress Book, February 16-December 1, 1899 17
 3. Frick asks if his letter will reach Carnegie in New York tomorrow. February 16, 1899 Telegram
 3. Frick wires Carnegie on a mail delivery to the New York, [N.Y.] office. [attached to previous correspondence] February 16, 1899 
 4. Frick writes on purchasing pig iron and being told by Mr. [Alexander] Peacock that they were 60,000 tons over-sold on billets. February 16, 1899 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Frick wires Carnegie on the Schoen contract being executed. February 17, 1899 Telegram
 70. Frick wires Carnegie on the St. Louis arriving on Saturday. March 15, 1899 Cablegram
 75. Frick writes on a proposition to buy pig iron from Valley Pig Iron Association. March 18, 1899 Typed Letter Signed
 82. Frick writes on buying 30,000 tons of pig iron from Valley Pig Iron Association. March 20, 1899 Telegram
 180. Asks to cable Finley from the Iron Trade Review in Cleveland, [Ohio] to ask that he publish only a portion of an article that gives his views of 1899. May 1, 1899 Telegram
 187. Frick will not be able to report until Thursday; however, things are progressing favorably. May 2, 1899 Telegram
 187. Frick wires Carnegie on the option money being deposited and on Carnegie's partners needing him for aid. [attached to prevous correspondence] May 4, 1899 
 187. Frick wires Carnegie on subscriptions being received at First National Bank. [attached to previous correspondence] May 5, 1899 
 188. Frick wires Carnegie a coded message. May 6, 1899 Telegram
 188. Frick wires Carnegie on underwriting, George Lauder refusing to accommodate, and Frick asks Carnegie if he could aid P.C. Knox. [Translation to previously coded telegram.] [attached to previous correspondence] May 6, 1899 
 231. Frick writes on Moore's plan not being made public and on the selling of stock. May 20, 1899 Telegram
 231. Frick wires Carnegie on suceeding in getting first proposed reorganization plan changed. [attached to previous correspondence] May 20, 1899 
 241. Frick writes on Mr. Moore's actions and on proposing an agreement with all partners who will have stock in the new company to not sell it for at least two years. May 23, 1899 Typed Letter Signed
 253. Frick wires Carnegie on stock information. May 27, 1899 Telegram
 467. Frick writes to Carnegie to propose a deal in which the Carnegie Steel Company and the Frick Coke Company and Allied Companies merge into one entity. November 18, 1899 Typed Letter Signed
  Volume
General Letterpress Book, December 2, 1899-December 7, 1900 18
 9. Frick presents his resignation as a member of the board. December 5, 1899 Typed Letter Signed
 444. Frick is obliged for Carnegie's estimate. November 10, 1900 Typed Letter Signed
 401. Frick writes Carnegie about the poor management of the Carnegie Company. Undated Cablegram
  Volume
General Letterpress Book, December 7, 1900-October 31, 1901 19
 176. Frick writes the Board of Directors of the Carnegie Company asking them to strike his signature from a record. March 29, 1901 Typed Letter Signed

Section: Incoming Correspondence, 1882-1898, 1912 

Scope and Content Notes

The correspondence in this section contains digitized images of original letters sent by Carnegie to Frick that is held within the Henry Clay Frick Papers at the Archives of The Frick Collection in New York City. The Archives Service Center has photocopies (see Box 710).

  BoxFolder
Incoming Correspondence, 1882-1888 7108
 1. Writing from Northallerton, England, Mr. I. Lowthian Bell informs Carnegie of a new invention for coke ovens and asks Carnegie in his interest on the matter. November 28, 1882 Autographed Letter Signed
 2. Writing from New York, Carnegie acknowledges the receipt of a statement and proceeds by inquiring about the high purchase price of coke. December 22, 1882 Autographed Letter Signed
 3. Writing from Baltimore, Mr. Thomas M. King asks Carnegie to persuade his partners to use the Pittsburgh & Western Railroad more often and to retain their stock in the company. October 15, 1885 Autographed Letter Signed
 4. In a wire from New York, Carnegie sends Frick a greeting on the occation of Frick's birthday and confirms a future meeting. December 19, 1885 Telegram
 5. Writing from Baltimore, Mr. Robert Garrett informs Carnegie about the assignment of construction contracts from the Baltimore and Ohio Railway company and Garrett also makes an inquiry about whether the railroad is being boycotted by Carnegie's coke business. December 26, 1885 Autographed Letter Signed
 6. In a wire from New York, Mr. George Lauder confirms with Mr. Henry Phipps that he is to attend an upcoming meeting. 1885 Telegram
 7. In a wire from New York, Carnegie suggests that the company go for an arbitration in a dispute and informs them his health is improving. February 10, 1886 Telegram
 8. In a wire from New York, a Mr. G.G.L. orders Henry Phipps to tell Frick that Carnegie wants him to settle a deal quickly on the best terms. February 19, 1886 Telegram
 9. In a wire from New York, Carnegie asks Frick about coke and getting protective forces for his operations. February 23, 1886 Telegram
 10. Writing from New York, Carnegie writes a harsh letter to Frick, advising him to invest in his own company and to not extend himself in Carnegie Brothers & Co. February 25, [1886] Autographed Letter Signed
 11. Writing from New York, Carnegie asks Mr. John Wilson of the Pennsylvania Railroad if they would reduce the rates of transporting coke and match their rates to their competitors. April 18, 1887 Autographed Letter Signed
 12. Writng from Philadelphia, Mr. Wilson of the Pennsylvania Railroad agrees to reduce rates and will discuss it with Frick to make a temporary arrangement. April 20, 1887 Typed Letter Signed
 13. Carnegie discusses meeting with some people, including Pennsylvania Railroad's lawyer for a business deal to double their investments. [April or May 1887] Autographed Letter Signed
 14. Keystone Bridge Co. informs Mr. S.E. Moore that due to high freight rates they will be unable to ship the bridge materials by April 1st, without their company losing money. May 12, 1887 Autographed Letter Signed
 15. In a note to Frick, Henry Phipps writes he won't attend a meeting as his presence won't make any difference. [May 12, 1887] Autographed Letter Signed
 16. In a cable from London, Carnegie tells Frick not to be misleading again and that "no stoppage tolerated." June 1, 1887 Cablegram
 17. In a cable from London, Carnegie states that Frick's reply was received well and that he should make and close a deal quickly. June 2, 1887 Cablegram
 18. Carnegie writes that while business is slow now, demand will increase, so they will reduce rates for now. [November 22, 1887] Autographed Letter Signed
 19. Carnegie discusses joining a sale with the Southern Pennsylvania Railroad and the benefits of doing so. [Month?] 14, 1887 Autographed Letter Signed
 20. Carnegie discusses suing Col. Schoonmaker and how they can improve their chances of getting some settlement. [Month?] 21, 1887 Autographed Letter Signed
 21. Writng from Washington D.C., John Dalzill gives advice in legal matters wth regards to the lawsuit against Col. Schoonmaker. January 10, 1888 Typescript copy
 22. Writing from Washington D.C., John Dalzell advises that as plaintiffs, the Frick Coke Company should argue that a written contract was made illegally, in the lawsuit against Col. Schoonmaker. On the reverse side of page 2--written note on the back of a letter, Carnegie asks Frick to inform the other partners involved as they go ahead with the lawsuit against Schoonmaker, which Carnegie also says that must fight hard for. He also mentions that he enjoyed Judge Mellon's latest book. January 10, 1888 Typescript copy
 23. In a wire from New York, Carnegie demands that Frick close a deal in Philadelphia immediately due to another situation in New York. November 13, 1888 Telegram
 24. In a wire from New York, Carnegie asks if there is any information about a Mr. Thompson and the Bullit matter. November 22, 1888 Telegram
  Folder
Incoming Correspondence, 1889-1894 9
 1. In a wire from New York, Carnegie asks if Frick will join Mr. David Hostetter to sign a deal with Mr. C. Vanderbilt if he thinks it's wise or Carnegie will give full power to Hostetter. Carnegie's wife Louise sends her congratulations. January 14, 1889 Telegram
 2. Frick writes about an ongoing worker's strike, including what the competition's men are doing and how despite the stirke, coke production and shipping is doing well. August 2, 1889 Autographed Letter Signed
 3. In a wire from New York, Carnegie asks Frick to look at the amount of acreage on the Davis property and tells Frick that a Mr. Lynch might visit and make a sale. November 10, 1889 Telegram
 4. In a wire from New York, Carnegie confirms standing firm on Braddock and inquires about Mrs. Frick. April 14, [1891] Telegram
 5. In a wire from New York, Carnegie asks if Frick and family are coming to New York after the lastest worker's strike. April 25, 1891 Telegram
 6. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses patents for a water pumping invention in mining. April 7, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Writing from New York, Carnegie tells Mr. W.C. Andrews that he will not use his invention unless he can use it for free. April 9, 1892 Typescript copy
 8. Writing from Sunningdale, England, Carnegie discusses with Frick the prices of an orchestrion. June 3, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Writing from Sunningdale, England, Carnegie discusses the potential of a worker's strike at Homestead which he believes will be resolved in the company's favor despite the union's demands. June 10, 1892 Typescript copy
 10. Writing from Sunningdale, England, Carnegie discusses company budgets, appointments, the worker's strike at Homestead and the orchestrion. June 17, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Writing from Kinloch Rannoch, Scotland, Carnegie expresses his dislike on proposed exhibition designs for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition. September 3, 1892 Typed Letter Signed
 12. Writing from Kingussie, Scotland, Carnegie discusses with Frick the purchasing of gold bonds in order to have more money for the company and how well their partnership works for the company. August 1, 1893 Autographed Letter Signed
 13. Writing from Luxor, Egypt, Carnegie catches up with Frick on how the company is running, including strategies for more profits and business plans for the end of the year. He also describes in detail his trip in Egypt sailing up the Nile River. February 13, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed
 14. Writing from Cannes, France, Carnegie discusses producing armor, rail and other steel products in order to get profits to get ahead of competitors and recent financial matters. He also details his meeting with Henry Phipps and his health condition. March 31, 1894 Autographed Letter Signed
 15. Carnegie writes to Henry Phipps how Frick grew angry at Carnegie for secretly meeting Mr. William Rainey without him and believes Frick is overreacting by resigning and selling his shares. He concludes that Frick must be unwell and wants to meet with Phipps to discuss a solution. [December 31, 1894] Autographed Letter Signed
  Folder
Incoming Correspondence, 1896-1897 10
 1. Carnegie writes to Frick about a misunderstanding concerning a recent business deal and yet, how going through with it will improve their rates on coke. April 29, 1896 Autographed Letter Signed
 2. Writing from Cumberland Island, Georgia, Carnegie demands that Frick not fail on getting a contract for freight prices. He also discusses the freight costs of other companies. March 1, 1896 Autographed Letter Signed
 3. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses the decreasing rates on coke, as well as plans for building a new freight rail line in defense against the competition. January 25, 1896 Typescript copy
 4. Writing from New York, Carnegie expresses his concern over the rates being charged on Pittsburgh compared to the competition by the Pennsylvania Railroad and discusses different alternatives. February 7, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 5. Writing from Cannes, France, Carnegie discusses using new coke ovens, Henry Phipps' acceptance of the Iron Clad Agreement and paying dividends. December 24, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 6. Writing from Cannes, France, Carnegie disagrees with Frick over the share of interest for one of their newly promoted partners, as well the shares of interest of other members in the company. December 15, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 7. Writing from Cannes, France, Carnegie discusses a deal with the Pennsylvania Railway and how their rates will affect the use of their Bessemer line. He also writes of producing a nail and rod combination. December 16, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 8. Writing from Cannes, France, Carnegie discusses having the Mellon family purchase gold bonds to help develop a coal and coke rail line. He also mentions ovens, the statuses of some partners and his family vacation. December 14, 1897 Typed Letter Signed
 9. Mr. W.C.M. explains to Frick the situation concerning a Mr. Guthrie breaking his contract on by-product coke with his current customer and making a new one with Frick. In a written note on the letter from W.C.M., Carnegie discusses the prices of coke and coal for an investment in those products to keep up earnings. December 6, 1897 Typescript copy
 10. Writing from Cannes, France, Carnegie discusses coke ovens, a possible railway connection to their mines and trunk lines and asks what he thinks of investing in a British company. He mentions his recent trip and Frick's daughter, Helen. December 1, 1897 Autographed Letter Signed
 11. Writing from Paris, France, Carnegie discusses putting money into Union Bonds and the money invested in Bessemer stock. He also informs Frick of a new rail line and how much he likes Frick's recent purchase of a painting depicting Christ. November 3, 1897 Autographed Letter Signed
 12. Writing from Kingussie, Scotland, Carnegie informs Frick about the suit against Colonel D.B. Dick over company shares. He also gives advice on fixing rates and deals with certain competitors. Carnegie asks Frick to persuade Phipps to sign the Iron Clad Agreeement. October 9, 1897 Typescript copy
 13. Writing from Kinguissie, Scotland, Carnegie tells Frick about his family including his newborn daughter, Margaret and his own health. He also describes how the death of his wife's grandmother has affected the family and Carnegie extends a visit to the Frick family to improve the atmosphere. June 24, 1897 Autographed Letter Signed
 14. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses the terms of a business agreement made earlier in the year with the Pennsylvania Railroad. In a post-script written on a copy of a letter to Mr. Thomson, Carnegie informs Frick not to antagonize the Pennsylvania Railroad during the agreement process. December 19, 1896 Typescript copy
 15. Writing from New York, Carnegie informs Frick he received his letter and that he's attached copies of letters he's written to James M. Swank concerning iron and steel rates. December 17, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 16. Writing from New York, Carnegie informs Frick that the purpose of a new railroad line is to get competitive rates for the company. December 9, 1896 Typed Letter Signed
 17. Carnegie discusses using a combination in order to get rates similar to the competition and the current rates of hauling raw materials, including coke. November 27, 1896 Autographed Letter Signed
 18. Writing from New York, Carnegie discusses various matters with Frick, including the cost of freights for ore and the division of costs on a loan from a lease on iron mines in Missouri. November 17, 1896 Autographed Letter Signed
  Folder
Incoming Correspondence, 1898, 1912, Undated 11
 1. Writing from Cannes, France, Carnegie discusses investing in producing steel freight cars. February 22, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 2. Writing from Cannes, France, Carnegie discusses the beginnings of the Spanish-American War and the freight and storage of coal. In a postscript, he mentions his health and his trip abroad. April 23, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 3. Writing from Aix-les-Bains, France, Carnegie discusses ways of getting better rates from the Pennsylvania Railroad, including purchasing the Isabella Coke Works and controlling the majority of pig-iron manufacturing. April 30, 1898 Autographed Letter Signed
 4. Carnegie cables Frick from Aix-lex-Bains, France, expressing his approval of the appointment of Mr. Grammer and informs him the Spanish American War is ending. May 8, 1898 Cablegram
 5. Writing from Aix-les-Bains, France, Carnegie informs Frick of his approval of working with Mr. Grammer. He also discusses placing Judge [Reed] in his company's legal department, the deception of D.B. Dick and asks about the Isabella furnace. May 9, 1898 Autographed Letter Signed
 6. Writing from Aix-les-Bains, France, Carnegie discusses how buying the Isabella furnace would not be sensible or feasible at this time and urges Frick to talk to a Judge about getting some money owed. May 12, 1898 Autographed Letter Signed
 7. Writing from Paris, France, Carnegie discusses with Frick how purchasing the Isabella furnace at this time is impossible under current conditons and how he and his family greatly enjoyed his trip to Aix. May 16, 1898 Autographed Letter Signed
 8. Writing from Dornoch, Scotland, Carnegie invites Frick and his family to visit the Carnegies at Skibo Castle while Frick is traveling in the UK and Europe. [June] 27 [1898] Autographed Letter Signed
 9. Writing from Dornoch, Scotland, Carnegie discusses how purchasing the Isabella furnace is not worth as much as the newly purchased Carrie furnace. He also mentions the great response to his arrival at Skibo. June 1, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 10.  Writing from Dornoch, Scotland, Carnegie states that business will greatly improve by the end of the Spanish-American War. He also tells Frick that his Skibo estate is beautiful and how he and Frick's daughter Helen should come and see it for themselves. June 6, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 11. Writing from Dornoch, Scotland, Carnegie discusses with Henry Phipps the price of the Frick Coke Company and the ways to protect its value while getting the most interest from it. June 11, 1898 Typescript copy
 12. Writing from Dornoch, Scotland, Carnegie discusses purchasing property in Chicago and taking advantage of making and selling pig iron in that market, in retribution against the Illinois Steel Company. He also mentions motor engines and other personal interests. June 13, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 13. Writing from Dornoch, Scotland, Carnegie discusses fishing and the public statement concerning the purchase of land in Chicago. He also compares the prices of pig iron in Chicago and Pittsburgh and which would be more advantageous. June 14, 1898 Typed Letter Signed
 14. Writing from Pittsburgh, Frick discusses meeting with all the partners for possibly starting a new branch company and the purchasing and division of bonds for the investment. December 30, 1898 Typescript copy
 15. A memorandum on Andrew Carnegie's testimony before a Congressional Committe in regards to United States Steel and referring to Mr. Frick and Mr. Phipps. [October 21, 1912] Typescript copy
 16. Carnegie discusses getting an unknown person on Frick's side and appealing to the State in an undisclosed matter. He also discusses foreign workers striking and visiting Bessemer to prevent future conflicts. [1892] Autographed Letter Signed

Subseries  2. Charles M. Schwab, 1889-1903 

Scope and Content Notes

Charles M. Schwab started out as a laborer in Carnegie’s companies, then worked his way up the ranks, holding management positions in Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited; Carnegie Steel Company, Limited; Carnegie Company; and eventually became the president of United States Steel Corporation and Bethlehem Steel. Correspondence between Frick and Schwab relates to day-to-day business, including some matters regarding labor issues. In a letter dated January 7, 1894, Schwab wrote Frick, “My own idea is that if the men hold any meetings or attempt to form any organization, we should be prepared to … unhesitatingly discharge any men connected with this movement.”

  BoxFolder
Schwab, Charles M., October 16, 1889-September 27, 1890 511
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., October 2-December 11, 1890 2
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., December 18, 1890-February 2, 1891 3
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., April 11-October 22, 1891 4
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., October 26, 1891-October 28, 1892 5
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., November 5-December 9, 1892 6
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., December 17, 1892-February 27, 1893 7
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., April 25-July 6, 1893 8
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., August 18-September 16, 1893 9
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., September 18-October 26, 1893 10
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., November 14, 1893-April 12, 1894 11
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., April 20-June 25, 1894 12
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., July 3-26, 1894 13
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., October 1-November 5, 1894 14
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., November 17-December 24, 1894 15
  BoxFolder
Schwab, Charles M., February 17, 1896-June 3, 1897 521
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., September 20, 1897-January 29, 1898 2
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., February 6-June 24, 1898 3
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., July 6-November 29, 1898 4
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., January 9-May 25, 1899 5
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., July 8, 1899-December 31, 1900 6
  Folder
Schwab, Charles M., January 22, 1901-May 14, 1903 7

Subseries  3. James Gayley, 1890-1900 

Scope and Content Notes

James Gayley held management positions for Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited and was the first superintendent at Edgar Thomson Steel Works. Later he became the Vice President for the United States Steel Corporation until his retirement in 1908. Gayley’s improvements to the blast furnace increased and stabilized the quality of pig iron produced and are still used today. The letters from Gayley are mainly to Frick discussing the daily business affairs concerning mill fuel consumption, equipment, furnaces, and rail production.

  BoxFolder
Gayley, James, May 23, 1890-July 3, 1891 501
  Folder
Gayley, James, September 4, 1891-February 27, 1893 2
  Folder
Gayley, James, May 26-August 28, 1893 3
  Folder
Gayley, James, October 21-December 29, 1893 4
  Folder
Gayley, James, January 20-June 8, 1894 5
  Folder
Gayley, James, August 16-December 12, 1894 6
  Folder
Gayley, James, June 10, 1896-January 2, 1900 7

Subseries  4. Employees and Business Transactions, 1888-1919 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries includes correspondence with various Carnegie employees such as George “Dod” Lauder, cousin of Andrew Carnegie; William A. Abbott, Chairman and President of Carnegie, Phipps, & Company, Limited; Daniel Ashworth, Consulting Engineer for Carnegie Brothers & Company, Ltd. and Carnegie, Phipps, and Company, Limited; Henry Phipps, Jr., business partner; J. W. Vandervolt, a friend of Carnegie; and John G. A. Leishman, Treasurer and Vice Chairman for Carnegie Brothers & Company, Limited.

Other correspondence in this series pertains to patent issues, armor plate production, and travel concerns. The letters regarding travel were written by George Lauder. After the horrific flood at Johnstown on June 4, 1889, Lauder wrote Carnegie, “The newspaper accounts of Johnstown are not over drawn, everyone who has been up says that no description can be given to equal the reality.” This letter was originally dated May 4th, but according to the content it was incorrectly dated.

There are also folders that consist of materials pertaining to James Howard Bridge, the author of The Inside History of the Carnegie Steel Company: A Romance of Millions. Bridge once worked with Andrew Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick. Many of the letters are from Bridge to Frick, but there are also some addressed to Mr. Francis W. McElroy. Some of the correspondence pertains to his publication, the Stanley Committee, and the option to buyout Carnegie in 1899.

  Folder
Abbott, William A., August 30, 1889-December 10, 1891 8
  Folder
Ashworth, Daniel, January 21-June 29, 1891 9
  Folder
Ashworth, Daniel, January 16-April 30, 1892 10
  Folder
Bosworth, Mahlon M., Feb. 12, 1898, April 16, 1901 11
  Folder
Bridge, James H., August 6, 1903-March 31, 1906 12
  Folder
Bridge, James H., undated 13
  Folder
Bridge, James H., August 25, 1903-August 14, 1930 14
  Folder
Clapp, Moses E., September 7, 1912, September 10, 1912 15
  Folder
“Jack,” July 25, 1900, July 28, 1900, August 28, 1900 16
  Folder
Knox, Philander C., November 13, 1903-May 29, 1919 17
  Folder
Lauder, George “Dod,” January 14, 1889-November 23, 1892 18
  Folder
Leishman, J.G.A., August 23, 1889-August 28, 1891 19
  Folder
Leishman, J.G.A., August 18, 1891-June 16, 1892 20
  Folder
Lovejoy, F.T.F., August 31, 1912, October 2, 1912 21
  Folder
Mellon, Andrew W., January 20, 1898 22
  Folder
Phipps, Henry Jr., July 25, 1889-January 25, 1900, undated 23
  Folder
Pitcairn, Robert, Sept. 4, 1888, September 28, 1888 24
  Folder
Thompson, Frank, 1899, 1904 25
  Folder
Unnamed Correspondence, 1888-1914 26
  Folder
Vandervolt, J.W., December 12, 1891 27
  Folder
Watson, D.T., December 6, 1888 28

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Series  X. Ephemeral Materials, 1878-1947 

Scope and Content Notes

This series contains ephemeral records that did not directly correspond to other series within the Henry Clay Frick Business Records. This series is divided into four subseries: Record Books, Civic Material, Railroad Records, and Engraving Plates. The materials in this series include correspondence, memorandum, notes, copybooks, administrative reports, bound ledgers, and engraving plates. The material dates from 1878 to 1947.

Subseries  1. Record Books, 1878-1942 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries contains record books, notebooks, receipt books, and a check register. Much of the material has very little writing in them and are not labeled. The stock and bond book provides a list of business contacts and numbers of total value shares. Information in the rent ledger provides very little information and contains only a small list of supplies. The materials in this subseries date from 1878 to 1942.

  BoxFolder
A.W. Mellon Receipt Book, October 1, 1888-August 16, 1900 531
  Folder
A.W. Mellon’s Pocket Book, February 26, 1891-August 4, 1893 2
  Folder
Miniature Pocket Notebook, 1923-1924 3
  Folder
Memoranda Record Book, 1895-1896 4
  Folder
Notes, Receipts, and Pamphlets, 1878-1914 5
  Folder
Index Book, 1889-1891 6
  Folder
Record Book, Letters from James M. Atcheson, October 29, 1895- Jan. 27, 1896 7
  Folder
Record Book, C. & H.R.R. Company, (blank), December 20, 1905 8
  Folder
Record Book, Union Land Company, (blank), June 21, 1889-June 28, 1889 9
  Folder
Check Register, (blank), November 17, 1939-January 8, 1942 10
  BoxFolder
Ledger Pages (Stocks), 1913-1914 541
  BoxVolume
Stock and Bonds Book, September 1, 1888 551
  Volume
Rent Ledger No. 4 Transfer, A. W. Mellon, March 13, 1902 2
  BoxVolume
Ledger, 1917-1918 561
  Volume
Ledger, 1918-1919 2

Subseries  2. Civic Material, 1899-1919 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries contains material related to civic and political functions in Pittsburgh. The material includes a senate resolution, improvement bills, estimates, statements, residential specifications, maps, and a court case. The Schenley court case involved the moving of a historic monument for the development a plot of land which Mary Schenley owned. The material dates from 1899 to 1919.

  BoxFolder
Senate Resolution, 1899-1927 571
  Folder
Senate Improvement Bill, undated 2
  Folder
Daughters of the American Revolution vs. Mary E. Schenley,  1902 3
  Folder
City and County Improvements, 1913-1919 4
  Folder
Comparative Statement of Traffic, September 1910, 1911 5
  Folder
List of Industrial Plants in the Pittsburgh District, undated 6
  Folder
Estimates, 1899, 1900 7
  Folder
Specification, Gymnasium and Residence, undated 8
  Folder
Illustrations and Maps, 1908-1919 9

Subseries  3. Railroad Records, 1902-1913 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries contains railroad records mainly containing Pennsylvania Railroad shipments, correspondence, agreements, and court cases. Also included in this subseries is a letterpress copybook labeled the Pennsylvania Railroad, “Warehouse Project.” The project pertains to the 1905 warehouses and freight station which distributed goods at the “Point” in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. However, it was torn down in the early 1950s to make way for Point State Park. This copybook contains outgoing copies mostly from Frick to Alexander J. Cassatt, the President of the Pennsylvania Railroad. However, there are some letters addressed to Frank F. Nicola, a Pittsburgh real estate developer. The remaining letters pertain to Andrew Mellon, Francis F. Lovejoy, Philander C. Knox, Mr. D.T. Watson, and a few others. The material dates from 1902 to 1913.

  BoxFolder
“Warehouse Project” Letterpress Copybook, April 19, 1902-July 16, 1913 581
  Folder
Pennsylvania Railroad Shipments, June 30, 1910-June 30, 1913 2
  Folder
Pennsylvania Railroad, October 11, 1919, undated 3
  Folder
Fort Smith & Western Railroad, January 4, 1899-March 30, 1901 4
  Folder
Cambria Steel Company and Pennsylvania Railroad, 1905-1909 5

Subseries  4. Engraving Plates, 1929 

Scope and Content Notes

This series includes printing and steel engraving plates. The printing plates include three miscellaneous engraving plates and three steel engraving plates which contain portraits of Frick. The larger steel plate is a bust of Frick and was engraved by E.G. Williams & Brothers. The two smaller ones are of Frick seated in a chair. One of the small steel engravings was done by Timothy Cole in 1929. The portrait of Frick seated in a chair has been reproduced in books, including Martha Frick Symington Sanger’s Henry Clay Frick: An Intimate Portrait. Most of the plates are undated and only one has a corresponding date of 1929.

  BoxItem
Print Engravings, undated 591
  Item
Print Engravings, undated 2
  Item
Print Engravings, Portrait of Today’s Smart Shopper,  undated 3
  BoxItem
Print Engraving, unidentified house, undated 601
  Item
Large Steel Engraving Plate, "Bust of Frick," undated 2
  Item
Small Steel Engraving Plate, "Frick Seated," undated 3
  Item
Small Steel Engraving Plate, "Frick Seated," 1929 4

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Series  XI. Faraday Coal & Coke Company, 1862-1934 

Historical Background

The Faraday Coal & Coke Company was created under West Virginia law on June 11, 1901 with a company mission of “mining, manufacturing, transporting, and selling of coal, coke, and all the products thereof.” The company’s main coal lands were located in the adjacent counties of McDowell County, West Virginia and Tazewell County, Virginia; however, the company also owned land in Kentucky. Over the years the majority of the land was acquired from original owners in small tracts that varied in size, eventually totaling over 25,000 acres. The purchased lands were located on or near the “Pocahontas Coal Seam” which runs along the boarder of Virginia and West Virginia.

Having interest in coal, Henry Clay Frick began to acquire Faraday Coal & Coke Company stock which soon exceeded all other stockholders. Frick then began to loan money to the Faraday Company to purchase additional property. By 1910, the company accumulated over $100,000 indebtedness to Frick. To payoff some of the debt the company handed over much of its Jellico coal property landholdings in Kentucky to Frick.

Faraday Coal & Coke Company stayed in business until November 3, 1924 when the Board of the Directors acknowledged the company’s indebtedness to Frick’s estates shortly after Frick passed away in 1919. The stockholders voted to dissolve and discontinue the company. The property was sold and the money helped pay company debts and liabilities. Also, a portion of the money derived from property sales was divided amongst the Trustees of Princeton University, President and Fellows of Harvard College, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Even some Pittsburgh institutions like Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, The Kingsley Association, Mercy Hospital, Homestead Hospital, and Connellsville State Hospital benefitted from the sale. The materials in this series date from 1862 to 1934. For more information about Jellico Coal Lands please refer to Series XVI.

Scope and Content Notes

This series is arranged into four subseries: Administrative Records, Correspondence, Financial Material, and Legal Material that pertain to Faraday Coal & Coke Company. The majority of materials consist of meeting minutes, maps, newspaper clippings, and a proposed plan for more coal works. The company’s daily business activities are documented in the meeting minutes in the Stockholders and Board of Directors, as well as in the correspondence. Faraday cashbooks, journals, and ledgers provide some financial information on business matters including legal expenses, salaries, deposits, reimbursements, stock certificates, and transfers. Other materials include royalties, interest statements, deeds, and maps. The maps of Faraday coal lands are located in the Maps and Architectural Drawings Series. Materials are arranged chronologically and date from 1862 to 1934, but the majority of the records are from 1901 to 1924 when the company was in operation.

Subseries  1. Administrative Records, 1894-1926 

Scope and Content Notes

Material in this subseries contains meeting minutes, reports, resignation letters, by-laws, certificate of incorporation, charters, memoranda, list of stockholders, and newspaper clippings. There are also blueprints, maps, photographs, record books, and a scrapbook. The first three boxes contain materials in relation to the proposed mining works called Beech Fork. In 1912, a mining engineer by the name Howard N. Eavenson created and submitted a report on mining works to the committee comprised of Karl F. Overholt, F.W. McElroy, and William Watson Smith. The report created by Eavenson is not found, but copies of the committee and supplemental report are included in this subseries. The committee created a report from Eavenson’s findings and presented it to the company’s board of directors. The committee report and exhibit are labeled as “A,” “B,” “D,” and “G.” Due to size, exhibits “C,” “D,” “E,” and “F” are in individual folders. The exhibits “A,” “B,” and “C” are located in the supplemental report material in Folder 02.

The minutes from the Board of Directors and Stockholders meetings are also included in this subseries. The original handwritten minutes are in the Faraday Coal & Coke Co. Minute Book. In addition to the minutes, there are documents from the meetings such as meeting notices, ballots, list of stockholders, drafts of minutes, charters, power of attorney, by-laws, and annual reports. The president of the company, A. Cummins, used these exhibits to give reports to the Board of Directors during the meeting of November 6, 1901.

Maps of Faraday property providing the locations of the Pocahontas Coal Seam, railroad tracks from companies like Virginia Railway and Norfolk & Western Railway as well as neighboring coal companies are also included. Additional maps can be found in the Maps and Architectural Drawings Series. These maps pertain to surveys, leases, and coal lands of the company. The Newspaper clippings contained in this subseries include articles from both newspapers and journals. However the majority of the clippings are from Virginia, West Virginia, and Pittsburgh newspapers. The journal articles are mostly from the Coal Trade Journal and they relate to coal and coke matters. The memoranda pertain to taxes, contracts, leases, settlements, agreements, deeds, and other general business matters. Material that pertains to the Eastern & Northwestern Railway Company are mostly books of transit notes, level locations, and treasurer bank records. There is also a company scrapbook for each of the years from 1913 to 1918. The materials in this subseries date from 1894 to 1926.

  BoxFolder
Beech Fork Works, Committee Report, June 10-December 12, 1912 611
  Folder
Beech Fork Works, Supplemental Report, September 29, 1913 2
  Folder
Beech Fork Works, Exhibit “C,” Blueprints, June 10, 1912 3
  Folder
Beech Fork Works, Exhibit “C,” Blueprints, June 10, 1912 4
  Folder
Beech Fork Works, Exhibit “C,” Copies, June 10, 1912 5
  BoxFolder
Beech Fork Works, Exhibits “E” and “F” Photographs, June 10, 1912 621
  BoxFolder
Beech Fork Works, Exhibit “D,” September 29, 1913 631
  Folder
Beech Fork Works, Exhibit “D,” No. 3, October 30, 1912-December 26, 1913 2
  Folder
Beech Fork Works, Exhibit “D,” No. 4, February 1-May 29, 1913 3
  Folder
Beech Fork Works, Exhibit “D,” No. 2, June 23-August 12, 1913 4
  Folder
Beech Fork Works, Exhibit “D,” copies, July 26-September 29, 1913 5
  Folder
Beech Fork Works, Notes, December 20, 1911 6
  Folder
Beech Fork Works, Notes, August 4-September 3, 1913 7
  Folder
Beech Fork Works, Tipple Specifications, April 17-July 31, 1912 8
  Folder
Beech Fork Works, undated 9
  Folder
By Laws, undated 10
  Folder
Directors, List of, May 31-June 13, 1901 11
  Folder
Maps, June 22, 1910-May 1921 12
  BoxFolder
Maps, July 23, 1909-October 24, 1923 641
  Folder
Maps, undated 2-3
  Folder
Emlyn Mine, December 1914 4
  BoxFolder
Meeting Minutes, June 8-November 24, 1901 651
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 28-July 3, 1902 2
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 27, 1903 3
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 26, 1904 4
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 24, 1905, October 3, 1905 5
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 23, 1906, April 3, 1906 6
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 16, 1907, January 22, 1907 7
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 28, 1908 8
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 26, 1909, November 17, 1909 9
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 25, 1910, December 15, 1910 10
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 24, 1911 11
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, February 23, 1911 12
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 23, 1912, December 31, 1912 13
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 28, 1913, October 6, 1913 14
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 27, 1914 15
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 26, 1915 16
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, April 5, 1915, June 30, 1915 17
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 25, 1916 18
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 23, 1917 19
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 22, 1918 20
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 28, 1919 21
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, December 22, 1919 22
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 27, 1920 23
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 25, 1921 24
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 24, 1922 25
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 23, 1923 26
  BoxFolder
Meeting Minutes, November 14, 1923, December 24, 1923 661
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, January 22, 1924, October 24, 1924 2
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, November 3, 1924, December 12, 1924 3
  Folder
Minute Book, June 8, 1901-November 3, 1924 4
  Folder
Annual Meetings, 1904-1919 5
  BoxFolder
Automobile Matters, April 21, 1917-December 3, 1917, 1923 671
  Folder
Resolutions, April 1908, December 14, 1923, December 15, 1923 2
  Folder
Secretary of the State, April 14, 1905-November 21, 1924 3
  Folder
William Watson Smith Letter, March 14, 1904 4
  Folder
William Watson Smith Letters, February 13, 1907-January 31, 1914 5
  Folder
William Watson Smith Letters, January 26, 1915-January 22, 1924 6
  Folder
Assessment of Coal Lands in Pa., June 27, 1914 7
  Folder
Loan Report, 1901-1913 8
  Folder
Bonus Report, 1901-1913 9
  Folder
Land Titles Report and Opinions, November 30, 1909-December 10, 1912 10
  Folder
Report on John Laing, December 18, 1916-March 10, 1917 11
  Folder
Report on John Laing, January 20, 1917 12
  Folder
Reports, May 1911-November 23, 1926 13
  Folder
Index Book, 1901-1924 14
  Folder
Index Book, June 27, 1917, November 3, 1919 15
  BoxFolder
Clippings, April 2, 1908-December 7, 1911 681
  Folder
Clippings, January 11, 1912-July 9, 1913 2
  Folder
Clippings, August 11, 1916-January 6, 1917 3
  Folder
Clippings, August 27, 1920-November 14, 1923 4
  Folder
Clippings, undated 5-6
  Folder
Memoranda, April 30, 1904-October 18, 1905 7
  Folder
Memoranda, June 13, 1907- November 11, 1911 8
  Folder
Memoranda, February 12, 1912-October 27, 1916 9
  Folder
Memoranda, June 14, 1918-October 20, 1921 10
  Folder
Memoranda, July 31, 1922-February 12, 1925 11
  Folder
Memoranda, undated 12-14
  Folder
Inventory of Maps, Papers, Office Furniture, etc., November 28-December 7, 1923 15
  Folder
Island Creek and Pond Creek Coal Company, undated 16
  Folder
List of Stockholders, December 31, 1904, December 21, 1909 17
  Folder
Eastern & Northwestern Railway Company, April 14, 1902, April 29, 1902 18
  Folder
Eastern & Northwestern Railway Company, July 18, 1902-April 24, 1903 19
  Folder
Proceedings of Directors of the Easter & Northwestern Railway Company, April 29, 1902 20
  Folder
“Pioneer of Electricity: Michael Faraday,” Juice 3, no. 6. June 1910 21
  BoxFolder
Eastern & Northwestern Railway Company, July 24-28, 1902 691
  Folder
Eastern & Northwestern Railway Company, July 1902 2
  Folder
Eastern & Northwestern Railway Company, 1902 3
  Folder
Eastern & Northwestern Railway Company, Dry Fork, undated 4
  Folder
H.C. Frick Notebook, January 26, 1894-January 20, 1898 5
  Folder
Finley, Mr. H.F., November 18, 1904, October 5, 1906, October 18, 1906 6
  Folder
Faraday Coal and Coke Company, Scrapbook, 1913-1918 7
  BoxFolder
Low Volatile Coals for By-Product Coking Purposes from Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia,  March 1923 701
  Folder
Results of Drilling and Prospecting, February 1920: Analysis of Drill Holes for Faraday Coal & Coke Company,  1923 2

Subseries  2. Correspondence, 1901-1934 

Scope and Content Notes

The letters in this subseries document the many business concerns and activities of the Faraday Coal & Coke Company. The correspondence consist mainly of incoming letters and telegrams, however, many are copies. Material such as newspaper clippings, notes, maps, and statements that came with the correspondence have been kept together. There are also nine letterpress copybooks included in this subseries that pertain to Faraday’s business activities. Volumes I and II are mostly outgoing correspondence from William A. Carr to various businesses and associates. Volumes III, IV, and the letterpress copybook dated December 30, 1914-October 1, 1919 are outgoing letters from Karl F. Overholt. The three smaller copybooks beginning with September 30, 1901 and ending with September 1, 1912 are mostly outgoing handwritten letters from A. Cummins, president of Faraday Coal & Coke Company. The remaining copybook is labeled as “Miscellaneous Letters and Statements,” and consists of letters dated from January 10, 1913 to February 23, 1917. The letters are mostly outgoing from K.F. Overholt. Names frequently mentioned in the letters are A. Cummins, President of Faraday; A.G. Russell, Chief Engineer and Faraday agent; William A. Carr, Secretary of Faraday; Karl F. Overholt, Secretary, Treasurer, and the first President of Faraday; H.C. Frick, stockholder; and Tye & Siler Firm, Attorneys for H.C. Frick Estate. The materials in this subseries date from 1901 to 1917.

  BoxFolder
Correspondence, April 18-August 9, 1901 711
  Folder
Correspondence, August 25-September 19, 1901 2
  Folder
Correspondence, September 28-October 25, 1901 3
  Folder
Correspondence, October 30-November 26, 1901 4
  Folder
Correspondence, December 4-31, 1901 5
  Folder
Correspondence, January 3-28, 1902 6
  Folder
Correspondence, January 30-March 4, 1902 7
  Folder
Correspondence, March 6-29, 1902 8
  Folder
Correspondence, April 1-28, 1902 9
  Folder
Correspondence, May 5-June 30, 1902 10
  Folder
Correspondence, July 2-9, 1902 11
  Folder
Correspondence, July 11-17, 1902 12
  Folder
Correspondence, July 24-August 5, 1902 13
  Folder
Correspondence, August 7-22, 1902 14
  Folder
Correspondence, September 11-October 9, 1902 15
  Folder
Correspondence, October 13-November 4, 1902 16
  Folder
Correspondence, November 6-25, 1902 17
  Folder
Correspondence, November 26-December 6, 1902 18
  Folder
Correspondence, December 13-31, 1902 19
  Folder
Correspondence, January 1-29, 1903 20
  Folder
Correspondence, February 3-April 8, 1903 21
  Folder
Correspondence, April 13-29, 1903 22
  Folder
Correspondence, May 2-June 3, 1903 23
  Folder
Correspondence, June 5, 1903, July 6, 1903 24
  Folder
Correspondence, July 17-August 17, 1903 25
  Folder
Correspondence, August 24-31, 1903 26
  Folder
Correspondence, September 2-7, 1903 27
  BoxFolder
Correspondence, September 8-15, 1903 721
  Folder
Correspondence, September 17-22, 1903 2
  Folder
Correspondence, September 24-27, 1903 3
  Folder
Correspondence, September 28-30, 1903 4
  Folder
Correspondence, October 1-6, 1903 5
  Folder
Correspondence, October 9-12, 1903 6
  Folder
Correspondence, October 13-18, 1903 7
  Folder
Correspondence, October 19-21, 1903 8
  Folder
Correspondence, October 22-31, 1903 9
  Folder
Correspondence, November 1-13, 1903 10
  Folder
Correspondence, November 14-19, 1903 11
  Folder
Correspondence, November 20-28, 1903 12
  Folder
Correspondence, November 30-December 1, 1903 13
  Folder
Correspondence, December 3-5, 1903 14
  Folder
Correspondence, December 8-14, 1903 15
  Folder
Correspondence, December 18-21, 1903 16
  Folder
Correspondence, December 22-31, 1903 17
  Folder
Correspondence, January 1-12, 1904 18
  Folder
Correspondence, January 13-21, 1904 19
  Folder
Correspondence, January 22-28, 1904 20
  Folder
Correspondence, January 29-February 9, 1904 21
  Folder
Correspondence, February 11-February 19, 1904 22
  Folder
Correspondence, February 22-29, 1904 23
  Folder
Correspondence, March 1-6, 1904 24
  Folder
Correspondence, March 4-14, 1904 25
  BoxFolder
Correspondence, March 16-18, 1904 731
  Folder
Correspondence, March 19-23, 1904 2
  Folder
Correspondence, March 24-31, 1904 3
  Folder
Correspondence, April 2-8, 1904 4
  Folder
Correspondence, April 9-20, 1904 5
  Folder
Correspondence, April 21-May 3, 1904 6
  Folder
Correspondence, May 7-16, 1904 7
  Folder
Correspondence, May 18-21, 1904 8
  Folder
Correspondence, May 22-24, 1904 9
  Folder
Correspondence, May 25, 1904, May 26, 1904 10
  Folder
Correspondence, May 28-June 4, 1904 11
  Folder
Correspondence, June 6-June 14, 1904 12
  Folder
Correspondence, June 15-20, 1904 13
  Folder
Correspondence, June 21-25, 1904 14
  Folder
Correspondence, June 28-July 1, 1904 15
  Folder
Correspondence, July 2-8, 1904 16
  Folder
Correspondence, July 11-21, 1904 17
  Folder
Correspondence, July 23-August 3, 1904 18
  Folder
Correspondence, August 4-9, 1904 19
  Folder
Correspondence, August 10-16, 1904 20
  Folder
Correspondence, August 17-26, 1904 21
  Folder
Correspondence, August 28-31, 1904 22
  Folder
Correspondence, September 1-5, 1904 23
  Folder
Correspondence, September 6-13, 1904 24
  Folder
Correspondence, September 14-21, 1904 25
  Folder
Correspondence, September 23-30, 1904 26
  Folder
Correspondence, October 3-16, 1904 27
  Folder
Correspondence, October 17-20, 1904 28
  Folder
Correspondence, October 21-November 9, 1904 29
  BoxFolder
Correspondence, November 10-19, 1904 741
  Folder
Correspondence, November 21-25, 1904 2
  Folder
Correspondence, November 26-30, 1904 3
  Folder
Correspondence, December 1-6, 1904 4
  Folder
Correspondence, December 7-15, 1904 5
  Folder
Correspondence, December 17-31, 1904 6
  Folder
Correspondence, January 4-21, 1905 7
  Folder
Correspondence, January 24-February 10, 1905 8
  Folder
Correspondence, February 12-27, 1905 9
  Folder
Correspondence, February 28-March 4, 1905 10
  Folder
Correspondence, March 6-9, 1905 11
  Folder
Correspondence, March 10-16, 1905 12
  Folder
Correspondence, March 18-27, 1905 13
  Folder
Correspondence, March 28-April 21, 1905 14
  Folder
Correspondence, May 1-9, 1905 15
  Folder
Correspondence, May 10-15, 1905 16
  Folder
Correspondence, May 17-23, 1905 17
  Folder
Correspondence, May 24-30, 1905 18
  Folder
Correspondence, June 3-21, 1905 19
  Folder
Correspondence, June 22-30, 1905 20
  Folder
Correspondence, July 1-10, 1905 21
  Folder
Correspondence, July 11-13, 1905 22
  Folder
Correspondence, July 14-24, 1905 23
  Folder
Correspondence, July 27-August 22, 1905 24
  Folder
Correspondence, August 23-31, 1905 25
  Folder
Correspondence, September 1-6, 1905 26
  Folder
Correspondence, September 13-21, 1905 27